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Darklyte27
02-01-2010, 7:34 PM
anyone have this kind of experience?
any suggestions? Cat 6 etc?

Rob454
02-01-2010, 8:23 PM
PM sent

GunNutz
02-01-2010, 8:27 PM
Are you looking for the wiring to be installed, or advice on setting up the network itself?

thedonger
02-01-2010, 8:56 PM
I would suggest you go with cat 6. You also might want to pull extra string or other wires while your at it for future tech.

thedonger
02-01-2010, 8:57 PM
Oh and if you find someone who will pull the wire for your cheep let me know...

Darklyte27
02-02-2010, 5:04 AM
its for a new house! i bought a house and its in the final stages
I will talk to the builder thursday and see what they or I can do.
if I can do it myself then gerat, if not then i guess i gota pay them.

I do have cat 6 cable i bought for 87$ for 1k ft from monoprice.com

mark2203
02-02-2010, 5:37 AM
The cable is cheap. CAT5e, CAT6. Doesn't really matter. It's the labor that will cost you. But if you're in construction and the sheetrock is off, it should be easy and absorbed pretty transparently into the cost of the overall build. Usually around $100-$200 per drop even with the sheetrock on assuming they can fish a wire through the wall.

The cost of pulling 1 or multiple lines per drop should be pretty close. Pull everything back and terminate it all in a central wiring closet, which should also be your main point of entry for service. Think of it like a hub and spoke. This will give you the ability to light-up every port in the house easily from one central location. At the same time, I would also recommend pulling your voice and coax lines back to that same closet so all your service comes in and can be managed through the house from one area.

Make sure your contractor finds someone who understands this type of work. Nothing's worse than trying to deal with an improperly wired house after the fact, like my house for example.

Oh..and if your a dork like me, put a drop in everywhere. Your bathrooms, kitchen, garage, patio, porch, every corner of the outside of your house. Voice, data, video, survellience, etc.

F-2_Challenger
02-02-2010, 6:07 AM
I would recommend cat 5e as there is no real advantage to cat 6. I think it will just be passed over like laser disks. While he is doing the Cat 5e( 2 strands) have him drop 2 fibers at the same time. Leave them behind the jack. Not worth paying for it now, but in the future :King:

Have him run to a central location (POP) where you phone line comes in along w/ coax. Neat stuff can be done. CCTV :cool2::cool2:

Talk about a sweet security system, depending on camera selection, could also be run off of cat 5e.

Depending on house one with crawl space I found is easier than with an attic. (FAT ARSE) I helped with a friends house and it rocks. Did it for around a 1000 bucks. And that included buying the tools and switch, router, and UPS.


Also consider 2 coax at the same time behind one for TV and one for CCTV.

Rob454
02-02-2010, 6:57 AM
I do data work at work and I also do it sometimes for a buddy or a friend of a buddy. When i run my lines I usually do a two cat 5 and two RG6 to every location that I want something at. At that point you have pretty much unlimited options. i install 4 port plates
Darklyte you have the best of both worlds that you can do your wiring before the sheetrock goes up. IF you can i would do at least a cat 5 and a coax at every location. If you have spare wires I would also look into doing cameras at at least the front entry and the back of the house maybe one in the garage and maybe perimeter.
I woudl run a cat 5 and a coax RG59 to those locations. If you dont use it ok no big deal but if you ever decide to get a CCTV system you already are wired up for it

PM me and Il get you some of the stuff you need. I cant get a ton of it but I can get you some to get you started if its a reasonable amount no problem.

nick
02-02-2010, 7:19 AM
Check the fire codes where you live. Depending on how you run it, you might have to use plenum grade cable. Also, check for potential sources of EMI, and try to run the cables away from them. And go with CAT6.

To the guy who said that there's no advantage to CAT6, I don't suppose you've dealt with much EMI on your cable runs? Running a 5ft cable from the home router to the computer and getting the 1Gbps link balloon on Windows doesn't count :p

Rekrab
02-02-2010, 11:05 AM
I can't think of a single good reason not to use Cat6 o.O

MFortie
02-02-2010, 11:33 AM
Umm, you guys ever heard of wireless? :p

Seriously, I design structured cabling installations for a living and probably wouldn't bother with copper anywhere in a house (for data). Except maybe for IP cameras and the WAPs.

And while the suggestion for running fiber is great in a business environment, I don't see any need for it in the home. Just more expense for patch panels, jacks, switches, terminations, yadda, yadda, yadda...

To the OP -- run CAT6 cable if you want some hard-wired data circuits in your house. Pick a fairly central location, put in a small wall mounted patch panel frame and call it good.

Of course if you're running OpteMAN into your house, you may want to rethink what I just said... Then again if you were, you wouldn't be posting the question on a gun forum... ;)

Regards,

Mark

Darklyte27
02-02-2010, 5:37 PM
So I have Cat6 on the way, if I was to install it myself, how do I do it?
When I worked for the County, we installed wires in the ceiling, cable trays, D rings, and dropped down walls which usually had fiber glass or some other insulation in them.

If I get the chance to install myself how do I do it?, the walls are still looking like this picture. Zip tie to wood? run along the walls? Drill holes and drop down to where the jack will be?
http://img686.imageshack.us/img686/433/img0043qd.jpg

G17GUY
02-02-2010, 9:07 PM
I was going to recommend some caddy hangers (http://www.erico.com/products/CADDY_CAT_LINKS.asp) but you’re only going to have a few cables thus being a house. I would get some zip ties that have the screw rings on them and create a nice path in the attic to your switch cabinet. Create like 1” rings with the zip ties and drape your cable through them. Leave them loose.
(http://www.tnb.com/contractor/docs/catamount.pdf zip ties called mounting head ties on page 2)

Drops-I would drill the top plate and just do drops down the wall. It’s easy to work with later when you want to add something. And, if you run horizontal in the wall and for some reason a drywall screw gets one of them it , your chances of having to abandon the wire and drill the top plate to drop a wire to that location are good anyway.

Probably overkill – however, you need to think about putting boxes in. You can leave the wire in the wall and come back and cut in com rings but since you have the chance you might as well put boxes on the studs (more support) since com rings are kind of cheesy. If you use boxes you will likely want to use smerf tube up the wall to the attic.

Just remember, the cable needs to be secured to the center of the stud on the drop to keep it from getting pinched between the drywall and the stud. Also you might think of pulling phone to each location also, you can use cat cable for this if you want, better in the long run.

G17GUY
02-02-2010, 9:14 PM
Check the fire codes where you live. Depending on how you run it, you might have to use plenum grade cable. Also, check for potential sources of EMI, and try to run the cables away from them. And go with CAT6.

To the guy who said that there's no advantage to CAT6, I don't suppose you've dealt with much EMI on your cable runs? Running a 5ft cable from the home router to the computer and getting the 1Gbps link balloon on Windows doesn't count :p

Cat7 is for high impedance locations, thats why it is sheilded. One plant I work in make us use it even though it is ran in ARC. lol

nick
02-02-2010, 11:40 PM
Cat7 is for high impedance locations, thats why it is sheilded. One plant I work in make us use it even though it is ran in ARC. lol

Shielding is good, but expensive. If you have to do it, you have to do it, but for most interference you run across in most households tighter twist rate of CAT6 is likely to be enough.

MFortie
02-03-2010, 8:08 AM
If your walls are open and you are going to put boxes in (as the above poster suggested), then I'd suggest stubbing into the ceiling space with 3/4" conduit -- PVC is fine. It's a heck of a lot easier to pull wires through a conduit than fish through the insulation later on!

And BTW, there is no 'CAT7' -- yup, people do market it, but there is no EIA/TIA standard (yet.) Class F in Europe is in the ISO/IEC standard (basically what we call CAT7...)

audiophil2
02-04-2010, 4:07 AM
Dont forget to wire home theatre while ur at it.

Rob454
02-04-2010, 6:18 AM
Check the fire codes where you live. Depending on how you run it, you might have to use plenum grade cable. Also, check for potential sources of EMI, and try to run the cables away from them. And go with CAT6.

To the guy who said that there's no advantage to CAT6, I don't suppose you've dealt with much EMI on your cable runs? Running a 5ft cable from the home router to the computer and getting the 1Gbps link balloon on Windows doesn't count :p

Its a house dude. There is no real advantage from a cat 5 to a cat 6 in a house. When I say Cat 5 its Cat 5E. I dont even think you can get the old cat 5 anymore. You simply don't have the sources for interference like you do in a hospital or maybe a high rise building etc I mean unless the guy has a linear accelerator or a MRI machine in his house Or a supercharged microwave Ive ran data in hospitals and high rise buildings. i do this for a living. Doesn't matter its all cheap wire. Plenum rating cable is not required in a house. The plenum cable rating is a smoke and fire rating. You can get shielded plenum data wire but its gonna cost more. You simply dont need that kind of data wire in a house.

As for running the wire get yourself some nail in or screw in D rings and nail your main run up high in your attic. if the whole house is one story then drill through the top plate at every location you plan on doing a drop. Drill near one of the studs and then place a Romex staple on the stud. sip tie the data wire to the Romex staple. Dont use the romex staple to secure the wire. One miss with the hammer and youre pulling more wire.
When you get to the bottom where the data port its gonna be placed it on the opposite stud of where you drilled the hole. the data wire shoudl look like this IJI the I is the studs the j is the wire.

Now if its a two story house I would run all the wires from upstairs down. if you get a few boxes you can run more than one run at one time. From upstairs drill down to where the data port is gonna be . Then run the wire straight up from downstairs all the way through the upstairs wall to the attic to your head in. Again use romex and zip ties
I would also run at two cat 6 and two coax from the MPOE to your main connection point. Like I said I woudl also pre wire for everythign else you may want. Surround sound and even a camera system. The wire price and total cost of the job now compared to trying to do it after drywall is both huge price wise and labor intensive

MFortie
02-04-2010, 8:24 AM
Its a house dude. There is no real advantage from a cat 5 to a cat 6 in a house. When I say Cat 5 its Cat 5E. I dont even think you can get the old cat 5 anymore. You simply don't have the sources for interference like you do in a hospital or maybe a high rise building etc I mean unless the guy has a linear accelerator or a MRI machine in his house Or a supercharged microwave Ive ran data in hospitals and high rise buildings. i do this for a living. Doesn't matter its all cheap wire. Plenum rating cable is not required in a house. The plenum cable rating is a smoke and fire rating. You can get shielded plenum data wire but its gonna cost more. You simply dont need that kind of data wire in a house.

As for running the wire get yourself some nail in or screw in D rings and nail your main run up high in your attic. if the whole house is one story then drill through the top plate at every location you plan on doing a drop. Drill near one of the studs and then place a Romex staple on the stud. sip tie the data wire to the Romex staple. Dont use the romex staple to secure the wire. One miss with the hammer and youre pulling more wire.
When you get to the bottom where the data port its gonna be placed it on the opposite stud of where you drilled the hole. the data wire shoudl look like this IJI the I is the studs the j is the wire.

Now if its a two story house I would run all the wires from upstairs down. if you get a few boxes you can run more than one run at one time. From upstairs drill down to where the data port is gonna be . Then run the wire straight up from downstairs all the way through the upstairs wall to the attic to your head in. Again use romex and zip ties
I would also run at two cat 6 and two coax from the MPOE to your main connection point. Like I said I woudl also pre wire for everythign else you may want. Surround sound and even a camera system. The wire price and total cost of the job now compared to trying to do it after drywall is both huge price wise and labor intensive

From MY end of structured wiring (the design side) I'm finding the main advantage is CAT6 is easier to find and cheaper than CAT5e.

As far as the OP pre-wiring for everything else he may want, if he doesn't have a design or plan in place, this is a heck of a time to try to rush everything through. He'd be ahead of the game if he ran conduit up through the top plate (I'd do just about every d@mn wall) so he can plan his install a little more leisurely. Mud rings and blank plates go a long way in the future...

BTW -- you don't need EMT or PVC conduit; look for innerduct and fasten it to the studs (just don't use flex!)

To the OP: installers will always tell you to do it the easy way. ;) If you want to do it right, listen to the guy who actually designs complex structured cabling systems (RCDD.) :D And yes, I am one.

Darklyte27
02-04-2010, 5:11 PM
I bought Cat6 1k ft for $86.71 from http://www.monoprice.com/products/subdepartment.asp?c_id=105&cp_id=10234
Cat5e is $57.13 per 1k ft

It is a single story home.
I went through the walk through today and the guy said they cant let me do it. Either go through the design center or do it myself after the home is complete.

Depending on cost from the design center, chances are $$$ ill probably do it myself.

the cat6 is on UPS right now, I have had experience pulling cable in county buildings so i have some experience.
We ran in cable trays, D rings etc.

The bad part is going to have to string it down the wall with the insulation there already..

~Scott~
02-04-2010, 6:06 PM
From MY end of structured wiring (the design side) I'm finding the main advantage is CAT6 is easier to find and cheaper than CAT5e.

As far as the OP pre-wiring for everything else he may want, if he doesn't have a design or plan in place, this is a heck of a time to try to rush everything through. He'd be ahead of the game if he ran conduit up through the top plate (I'd do just about every d@mn wall) so he can plan his install a little more leisurely. Mud rings and blank plates go a long way in the future...

BTW -- you don't need EMT or PVC conduit; look for innerduct and fasten it to the studs (just don't use flex!)

To the OP: installers will always tell you to do it the easy way. ;) If you want to do it right, listen to the guy who actually designs complex structured cabling systems (RCDD.) :D And yes, I am one.

I am an RCDD as well.... I was just sitting back laughing at some of the suggestions in this thread and the misplaced references to impedance and EMI.:D

I sometimes have to remind myself that residential is a whole different animal... most of the residential guys are just plain hacks. Not all.... but most.

I think the OP has gotten enough information about the cabling. What I might add is: EITHER give yourself a pathway to get down the wall at a future date, OR add as much cabling as you think you might need for the forseeable future. You don't have to do both. Your most future proof solution is the pathway. Don't forget to consider the locations for possible video surveillance, external speakers etc. You may also want some flexibility in your entertainment area to add speakers in several locations including the ceiling. Oh, and don't forget those power outlets in the eaves for your christmas lights!

I would run a couple of quad-shield RG-6 drops from your service location on the side of the house as well as 4-6 Cat-5e or Cat-6 cables to a location inside where the rest of your cables will be terminated. You don't want to have to get to that box later. If you use satellite, run two RG-6 there as well.

Don't kink or crush any of the cables (including tie-wraps that are too tight around the bundle) as changing the cable geometry can cause a host of problems you don't want. Also, stay away from any power cables... and running parallel with power is worse than crossing it at a right angle.

I know you already have cable, but for residential, you can use a CM rated cable which may (I don't do residential) be less expensive than the CMR cable that you probably bought. CMP is a more expensive cable dealing with smoke toxicity and density... and then there's the low smoke zero halogen stuff..:D

FWIW, my house has one Cat-5e for voice, one Cat-6a for data and one quad-shield RG-6 for video at every location that I installed.

Good luck with your new home and congratulations!

Scott

Rob454
02-04-2010, 6:48 PM
From MY end of structured wiring (the design side) I'm finding the main advantage is CAT6 is easier to find and cheaper than CAT5e..

Really? Wow and you design structured cable systems? ive had no problem finding either style cabling and Cat5E is cheaper than Cat 6 BTW

To the OP: installers will always tell you to do it the easy way. ;) If you want to do it right, listen to the guy who actually designs complex structured cabling systems (RCDD.) :D And yes, I am one.

LOL. yeah i deal with designers/engineers every day. Pretty fun to play with you guys:D especially the new guys. i especially like to RFI when big mistakes are made. i found out that most designers have no clue how to install what they design. Compared to some of the stuff i design structured cabling is small stuff.


OP
Since it looks like you are buying a tract style house you really cannot touch the house because it really doesn't belong to you. I mean even if its through escrow and you "own " it it does not belong to you simply because its still being built. part of the reason you cannot do work on it is because of a liability issue the other is that they have subcontractors who are supposed to get the work. A long time ago ( 12 so years ago i used to do track houses in San Clemente. I've probably done 2000 plus houses in that area. Ive had a few cases where the homeowner snuck in on a weekend ( usually a day or so before sheet rock went up and the homeowner went and wired up his house for structured cable and sec alarm or whatever else can lights etc. You'll be surprised what people can get done in one evening. We specifically went in the house the morning of and if the houses had the cable down we either tore it out or cut it in hard to access places. This was a order from the main office. Since its a one story house its really not that hard to wire for cable. I still do wire some houses here and there. Since you really cant do anything i would go get some pull string and then drill your holes and run a pull line through the hole. you can tie the string to a romex staple opposite stud from a outlet box this way youll know the height and location and use a retro ring instead of a mud ring. And you can use the pull string to pull your wire down the wall. Lots of times I let that slide. Ive had irate customers complain about the cut wires but nothing ever happend because the builder wont side with the homeowner.

GrinderCB
02-04-2010, 7:51 PM
Here's a good site with loads of info. True, it's a bit dry, boring reading but it's searchable (like "Cat 5e vs Cat6") and can really help:

http://homenethelp.com/

One key suggestion is to spend the extra money and effort and install flush-mounts on the walls. Makes the place a whole lot tidier-looking instead of having cables coming up from the baseboards. It's a plus to your resale value if you ever move.

SLYoteBoy
02-04-2010, 8:06 PM
make sure to use nailplates where applicable! nothing blows more then trying to use a wire and find out its DOA.

MFortie
02-05-2010, 9:03 AM
[QUOTE=Rob454;3755459]Really? Wow and you design structured cable systems? ive had no problem finding either style cabling and Cat5E is cheaper than Cat 6 BTW



LOL. yeah i deal with designers/engineers every day. Pretty fun to play with you guys:D especially the new guys. i especially like to RFI when big mistakes are made. i found out that most designers have no clue how to install what they design. Compared to some of the stuff i design structured cabling is small stuff.
QUOTE]

I'm certainly not one of the 'new guys' and I was designing network infrastructure and pulling cabling back in the 80's before the standards were even published. I have my industry certifications along with my stamp -- did you pass the RCDD? Didn't think so...

Rob454
02-05-2010, 4:44 PM
[QUOTE=Rob454;3755459]Really? Wow and you design structured cable systems? ive had no problem finding either style cabling and Cat5E is cheaper than Cat 6 BTW



LOL. yeah i deal with designers/engineers every day. Pretty fun to play with you guys:D especially the new guys. i especially like to RFI when big mistakes are made. i found out that most designers have no clue how to install what they design. Compared to some of the stuff i design structured cabling is small stuff.
QUOTE]

I'm certainly not one of the 'new guys' and I was designing network infrastructure and pulling cabling back in the 80's before the standards were even published. I have my industry certifications along with my stamp -- did you pass the RCDD? Didn't think so...


LOL No Im not RCDD ceritfied but I have BICSI cert, Cal state fire/life safety cert, Cal state electrical cert. NICET level IIIcert ( working on level 4 but school is a PITA right now) , had a c0ontractors license, State alarm company operator etc. All this certs IMO are worthless if you cant do the job right the first time. i can throw certs at you all day long but certifications never impressed me. how you do your job and how good you are at your job is what impresses me. I can tell you how many guys I have showing up with credentials as long as my arm and you throw them out in the field and they cant do **** to save their lives.
Either way not trying to compare units here, so back to the OPs question

Darklyte27
02-06-2010, 5:27 AM
were going to the design center thing today, im not sure if they are putting up the drywall up already but ill see if i can get them to put some pull strings. But yes, the "liability" issue.. money getting in the way of efficiency..

Rob454
02-06-2010, 6:31 AM
were going to the design center thing today, im not sure if they are putting up the drywall up already but ill see if i can get them to put some pull strings. But yes, the "liability" issue.. money getting in the way of efficiency..

I understand what youre saying but to be the devils advocate the sub that does the data networking contract gets screwed. basically the builder looks at it this way. if a homeowner comes in to do their own work, if they fall break their leg etc its a big hassle, also if the HO goes and drills through a load bearing beam or nicks the electricians wires or plumbers pipes etc then that creates a hassle for the builder and all the subs that are affected by that.
Your average homeowner has no clue about house construction, structured cable electrical or plumbing ( and the codes that apply to those trades) or how to install the stuff without doing something wrong.
Remember that before drywall goes up a inspector has to sign off on all the work that has will be covered up by drywall. Some of the work may be somethign that did not pass a month or two ago/correction to work done but they fixed it and need a sign off. And if a homeowner goes in and does somethign wrong then they gotta fix it to the inspectors satisfaction. Yeah you will pay a little to have the work done but if there is a problem its warreantied and they gotta figure out how to fix it. You can get them to do just the wiring I can get you the data blocks phone blocks etc at cost. Most likely they will use Open House products cause a lot of builders use that

MFortie
02-06-2010, 7:11 AM
[QUOTE=MFortie;3757984]


LOL No Im not RCDD ceritfied but I have BICSI cert, Cal state fire/life safety cert, Cal state electrical cert. NICET level IIIcert ( working on level 4 but school is a PITA right now) , had a c0ontractors license, State alarm company operator etc. All this certs IMO are worthless if you cant do the job right the first time. i can throw certs at you all day long but certifications never impressed me. how you do your job and how good you are at your job is what impresses me. I can tell you how many guys I have showing up with credentials as long as my arm and you throw them out in the field and they cant do **** to save their lives.
Either way not trying to compare units here, so back to the OPs question

LOL! I was gonna ask if you wanted to grab the tape measures and unzip! :D

But you're right; most of the certs aren't worth the paper they're printed on and it's the individual that makes it or breaks it. Sounds like we're both successfull and happy with what we do and where we are, so I guess we can put away the tape measures... ;)

I think the OP got his answer from the design center and I'm not surprised. Too bad; back when I bought my house (in the '80's), the contractor let me go in on weekends and do all the wiring I wanted. And as I mentioned before, I run wireless now for just about everything, so it wouldn't have made a difference what I put in the walls back then.

Darklyte27
02-06-2010, 3:33 PM
ya i totally understand. its just a inconvenience.
So the design center lady said to pull cabling for me was about 1500$ or something HAHA!

I said ya no thanks ill do it myself later..

All we upgraded was the kitchen sink to stainless because of the granite counter tops easily damaged if i tried to do it after. so total costs of upgrades 675$. Yes i know stainless steel sinks cost only 2-300$ but oh well.

I understand what youre saying but to be the devils advocate the sub that does the data networking contract gets screwed. basically the builder looks at it this way. if a homeowner comes in to do their own work, if they fall break their leg etc its a big hassle, also if the HO goes and drills through a load bearing beam or nicks the electricians wires or plumbers pipes etc then that creates a hassle for the builder and all the subs that are affected by that.
Your average homeowner has no clue about house construction, structured cable electrical or plumbing ( and the codes that apply to those trades) or how to install the stuff without doing something wrong.
Remember that before drywall goes up a inspector has to sign off on all the work that has will be covered up by drywall. Some of the work may be somethign that did not pass a month or two ago/correction to work done but they fixed it and need a sign off. And if a homeowner goes in and does somethign wrong then they gotta fix it to the inspectors satisfaction. Yeah you will pay a little to have the work done but if there is a problem its warreantied and they gotta figure out how to fix it. You can get them to do just the wiring I can get you the data blocks phone blocks etc at cost. Most likely they will use Open House products cause a lot of builders use that

Rob454
02-06-2010, 5:35 PM
[QUOTE=Rob454;3760142]

LOL! I was gonna ask if you wanted to grab the tape measures and unzip! :D

But you're right; most of the certs aren't worth the paper they're printed on and it's the individual that makes it or breaks it. Sounds like we're both successfull and happy with what we do and where we are, so I guess we can put away the tape measures... ;)

I think the OP got his answer from the design center and I'm not surprised. Too bad; back when I bought my house (in the '80's), the contractor let me go in on weekends and do all the wiring I wanted. And as I mentioned before, I run wireless now for just about everything, so it wouldn't have made a difference what I put in the walls back then.


LOL yeah you're right about that. I'm pretty happy at what I do sometimes its a drag cause either I goof or someone goofs and then the whole erector set breaks down. The nice thing about a contractor in the 80s those guys were cracking open the suds at about noon thirty and went home. it used to be easy to sneak something in cause back then most electricians didn't want to deal with it and didn't really care.

To the OP bro its really not that hard to run the wire afterwards. Im sure you can find someone who is hungry enough and will do the job for you. If you were in OC i woudl give you a hand with the wiring.

Darklyte27
02-07-2010, 7:16 AM
thanks, im sure i can do it myself, im going to use this wire python and return it when im done
fHz3yP-PW2A

Gnzrme
02-07-2010, 9:00 AM
Thats a cool idea....Hope it works as easy as it does in the video....

Rob454
02-07-2010, 8:11 PM
Thats a cool idea....Hope it works as easy as it does in the video....


LOL yeah we have some of those. Theire ok as long as the wall has no insulation

Satex
02-07-2010, 10:05 PM
LOL yeah we have some of those. Theire ok as long as the wall has no insulation

Isn't insulation installed only in outside walls?

Darklyte27
02-12-2010, 5:38 PM
thats a good question, according the the pics i took when the insulation was in the walls, the inside walls were not filled so i think it will be empty which will be good. But if i want any connections on the outside walls that will be a different story..

Rob454
02-12-2010, 6:17 PM
Isn't insulation installed only in outside walls?

Depends. ive seen custom homes that have insulation in all walls. Depends on the builder. Some builders especially custom home builders can get carried away

kperry
02-21-2010, 7:02 PM
You might also consider something like this:
Ethernet & Coaxial Composite Cable (http://www.deepsurplus.com/Network-Structured-Wiring/Multimedia-Cable-Composite-Ethernet-Coaxial-Fiber-Optic-Cable/Ethernet-Coaxial-Composite-Cable-2-CAT5E-2-Quad-RG6-500ft-Bulk-Composite-Cable) - I don't have a @#%-load of alphabet certifications, but I've been doing audio and video postproduction for about 15 years now, and am now working for a major home theater technology company. (It's what I bought to retrofit my 1962 ranch-style house...) They also carry a version with fiber, but I can't see the need for it, either.
As far as the insulation goes - I like running all of my wiring in conduit at least to the top of the wall plate, and insulating the wall cavities, preferably with rockwool - primarily for the sound isolation. Helps to keep from traumatizing the kids in the next bedroom....