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View Full Version : Trigger Pull on Smith M642 Snubnose revolver


JosephP
01-12-2010, 8:40 PM
I recently got smith&wesson M642 which is double action only revolver and It is bit heavy on the trigger.
I think factory setting for the trigger pull on this revolver is 15lb.

Okay here is my question.

How heavy do you guys think it is good on this pistol for self-defense?
I'm planning to do some trigger job myself on this revolver and I'd like to get some opinion from you guys on the trigger pull #.

Thanks in advance.

- Joseph -

JosephP
01-12-2010, 10:19 PM
I tried that 2 stage skill with my Smith M66 and am using it in the shooting range.
But M642 is for back-up which means it is for point and shoot as quickly as possible.
I don't think I have time to use the trigger in 2 stage mode when the things get hot.
So I want to get everyone's opinion on the ideal triger pull weight for the self-defense DAO revolver.
I am thinking about 6~7lb.
Is it too light?
What you guys think?

boats1
01-13-2010, 5:26 AM
I tried that 2 stage skill with my Smith M66 and am using it in the shooting range.
But M642 is for back-up which means it is for point and shoot as quickly as possible.
I don't think I have time to use the trigger in 2 stage mode when the things get hot.
So I want to get everyone's opinion on the ideal triger pull weight for the self-defense DAO revolver.
I thinking about 6~7lb.
Is it too light?
What you guys think?

Our local smith put in a lighter spring and did a little smoothing out when in there. Charged $30, I think. I do not remember the new spring number, but I'd guess it cuts off about 25-30% of the tension. We also practice the two-staged pull, as the other poster suggested.

Mr. Beretta
01-13-2010, 7:48 AM
Leave it alone. It was made that way for a reason. Those guns (I own a 342Ti) were designed & intended for very personal close encounters. It ain't going to matter if the unthinkable happens. Believe me,if you stay current / practice with it & if you ever have to use it, you're never going feel nor remember, how many lbs. the trigger pull was. JMHO

Good Luck!

Trapper
01-13-2010, 8:08 AM
A simple spring change will not give you a good trigger pull. I'd look for a good gun smith to polish the internals and smooth out the trigger but leave the pull at 10-12lbs.

dfletcher
01-13-2010, 8:09 AM
I tried that 2 stage skill with my Smith M66 and am using it in the shooting range.
But M642 is for back-up which means it is for point and shoot as quickly as possible.
I don't think I have time to use the trigger in 2 stage mode when the things get hot.
So I want to get everyone's opinion on the ideal triger pull weight for the self-defense DAO revolver.
I am thinking about 6~7lb.
Is it too light?
What you guys think?

I have a fair amount of hammerless J frames and think a 6 or 7 DA pull is very optimistic. With the caveat that being certain the gun goes "bang" every time the trigger is pulled and that you want a strong trigger return, you could go to a 13 lb trigger return spring and (maybe) a lighter mainspring. On the coiled J frame mainsprings I've heard that even Wolff aftermarket can give a misfire, but that has not been my experience.

That and having the internals polished is probably about it. After that - practice, practice, practice I guess. They're not easy guns to shoot well.

JosephP
01-13-2010, 11:21 AM
Thanks everyone for the comment.
I have done polishing job myself with dremel tool in couple of mine and other peoples and result was pretty good. :)
I will try that with my 642.
I wii try it from 10lb and going down till I get right feeling.

DougJ
01-13-2010, 12:19 PM
I just put some Wolff springs in my wifes 642. I used a slightly reduced power 8lb mainspring and a 13lb rebound spring. I also carefully polished the rebound slide. I don't have a scale in this range so I don't know exactly what I've got yet. Although it does feel better, I just did this so I have not fired it yet.

I would stay away from the trigger with a dremel...:)

jazman
01-13-2010, 3:16 PM
On a new one before you do anything, dry fire it a ton. Hundreds and hundreds of times, you will be surprised how it can smooth itself out.

JosephP
01-13-2010, 3:24 PM
I got it as used one.
So It has been fired and still seem to bit heavy for me.
I already ordered hammer spring as well as rebound spring from wolff.
So I will try with those + bit of polishing with compound paste.

9mmepiphany
01-13-2010, 6:07 PM
hammerless J frames and think a 6 or 7 DA pull is very optimistic

to get down to that range and maintain reliable ignition will take more than polishing and a change of springs.

it takes an action tune to align the cylinder, head space and ejector star engagement with the hand

at least that's what i had done to mine before i started carrying it

JosephP
01-18-2010, 5:11 PM
I just put some Wolff springs in my wifes 642. I used a slightly reduced power 8lb mainspring and a 13lb rebound spring. I also carefully polished the rebound slide. I don't have a scale in this range so I don't know exactly what I've got yet. Although it does feel better, I just did this so I have not fired it yet.

I would stay away from the trigger with a dremel...:)

I'm not trying to grind out the parts with dremel tool. :)
I'm just going to polish couple of parts with compound paste.
Thanks for the reply :)

ZUMNDAD
01-18-2010, 5:33 PM
I had mine tuned and had the trigger pull dropped to 4.5 lbs. as well as having them align the CTC's for an intended POI of 10'. Great weapon.

DougJ
01-18-2010, 8:05 PM
I'm not trying to grind out the parts with dremel tool. :)
I'm just going to polish couple of parts with compound paste.
Thanks for the reply :)

LOL, that's what I was hoping. ;) Let us know how it works out, maybe I'll give it a shot on my wife's gun.

lazs
01-19-2010, 9:31 AM
I agree with mr beretta .. unless the pull is 20 lbs and gritty.. leave it alone.

I have a 340pd and it was a bit gritty but even at this stage of my life I am strong enough to handle it. I want a defensive gun to go bang every single time.

Dry fire the crap out of it and the pull will lighten (or seem to) and the gritty feel will go away and it will still strike the primers with enough force to go bang every time. 90% reliable ignition is worthless in my opinion.

paladin4415
01-19-2010, 10:39 AM
I agree with mr beretta .. unless the pull is 20 lbs and gritty.. leave it alone.

I have a 340pd and it was a bit gritty but even at this stage of my life I am strong enough to handle it. I want a defensive gun to go bang every single time.

Dry fire the crap out of it and the pull will lighten (or seem to) and the gritty feel will go away and it will still strike the primers with enough force to go bang every time. 90% reliable ignition is worthless in my opinion.

My opinion also...leave it alone.

will227457
01-19-2010, 11:32 AM
leave it alone, dont stage the trigger, horrible habit unless you are target shooting, practice a smooth follow through and you will be more accurate in the long run

dry fire dry fire dry fire dry fire

one more thing.....

dry fire

Californio
01-19-2010, 5:53 PM
I have an old Model 38, practice with it and leave it be.

otteray
01-19-2010, 6:18 PM
I dry fired the heck out of mine and not only has it lightened, my finger is much stronger!:)

lazs
01-20-2010, 1:13 PM
LOL.. yep.. your finger will get stronger.. just before it starts to bleed. Dry firing is a poor mans trigger job. Sure, the old revolvers had better triggers than today but most of em were not near as nice as they are after 50 years of being used.

I also am not a big fan of staging the trigger.. it is too easy to go past. add a little fear or confusion and it is almost certain.

My biggest problem is large hands/long fingers... they actually get in the way of the operation of the gun if I don't hold just right.

CaliforniaLiberal
01-20-2010, 1:27 PM
Thanks everyone for the comment.
I have done polishing job myself with dremel tool in couple of mine and other peoples and result was pretty good. :)
I will try that with my 642.
I wii try it from 10lb and going down till I get right feeling.


Are you experienced with trigger work on double action revolvers?

They were designed and built the way they are for very good reasons.

One of the problems with lightening the trigger pull is that you can get to where there is not enough energy in the firing pin to reliably ignite the primer 100% of the time. It is not a simple and straightforward process. Please proceed with extreme caution if you are learning as you go along.