PDA

View Full Version : Opinions on the Sig 226 Navy?


M1A Rifleman
01-12-2010, 11:15 AM
What are the opinions of the Sig 226 Navy? I read it is identical to the Navy issue. I was thinking of a Beretta M9A1, but I read they are challenged and the 226 is way better. Thoughts and opinions pls.

kduly
01-12-2010, 12:03 PM
I love the P226. Great proven sidearm. I suggest you rent both and see the differences. The Sig just melts in my hand and extremely accurate. You can't go wrong with the P226.

sonico
01-12-2010, 12:49 PM
Any reason you want the Navy version? Unless you're doing amphibious landings it seems kind of gimmicky to me, just my opinion.

That said, I love my P226. I shot all manner of 9mm's including the Beretta before I made my choice.

Rent both. Shoot both. You should be able to determine a winner.

hybridatsun350
01-12-2010, 1:26 PM
If I had the two guns laying in front of me and had no preconceived opinions about them, I would pick the Beretta every time. It looks a lot better and just feels so much better in my hand. Having that said, the P226 is probably the better gun as far as ultimate reliability and longevity (if only slightly). I would definitely try and rent them both and shoot them. If it means anything, I'm a whore for low bore axis so the SIG bugs the heck out of me.

Rekrab
01-12-2010, 1:57 PM
I've only shot the standard 226, but between the two I like the Beretta a lot more. I like the balance, the grip and especially the weight. It feels like the muzzle flip is much more manageable on the Berretta.

aplinker
01-12-2010, 2:12 PM
What are the opinions of the Sig 226 Navy? I read it is identical to the Navy issue. I was thinking of a Beretta M9A1, but I read they are challenged and the 226 is way better. Thoughts and opinions pls.

As much as I like the Beretta, the P226 is loads better.

The current P226 Navy, IIRC, is not identical.

I had a Navy and found the trigger less than stellar, for a SIG, but still damned good. FWIW - my SIG smith said this is typical of the Navy triggers, as they're treated for corrosion resistance.

As much as I love the P226, I'd suggest considering a P228.

FlyingDesertEagle
01-12-2010, 2:13 PM
My experience is between the 92f and the older 226. Between those i'd go with the Sig every time. The stamped slide 226 would shoot circles around the pretty italian job.
Nowadays, the US made Sigs aren't as great as the originals, I'd probably go with whichever shot better for me.

Caseless
01-13-2010, 9:42 AM
What are the opinions of the Sig 226 Navy? I read it is identical to the Navy issue. I was thinking of a Beretta M9A1, but I read they are challenged and the 226 is way better. Thoughts and opinions pls.

You're correct sir. German engineering beats Italian engineering everytime when it comes to handguns.
I only handled a Navy model once, and it's very smooth in function and feel.

Throughout the years, I had witnessed one case of the infamous Beretta locking block failure during a local club match. I have never seen any such major malfunction with Sig pistols.

Beretta can say they have improved the design, etc. But in my humble personal opinion, any "corrective" action on a firearm design after its release means sloppy engineering in my book.
Here's some food for thought on the Beretta M9 issue.
http://www.sightm1911.com/lib/history/true_story_m9.htm

M1A Rifleman
01-13-2010, 9:56 AM
Thanks for your help as I am sure my decision won't be for a Beretta. I read last night in my kids book that the French use the 92f as their military pistol. They had problems with the slides cracking after only 6000 rnds.

gumby
01-13-2010, 10:21 AM
About a year ago the French police replaced their 92G with sigpro 2022, don't know about the military.

jeffrice6
01-13-2010, 10:56 AM
It is my understanding that todays 226 navy is not like the NSW navy and the ones the actual seals used......I believe all you receive now is a 226 with an anchor on it......The true navys had the phosphate coating on the internals.......
My NSW is the first sig I've ever owned & its a great weapon. My small gripes are that the trigger is a tad gritty & heavy (not doing a trigger job...Just leaving her stock) and the sights are off a bit (seems sig makes sure they go bang but does not sight them in to well). Neither are a big deal or expense & over all I am very happy with my purchase.

hybridatsun350
01-13-2010, 11:00 AM
It is my understanding that todays 226 navy is not like my NSW navy and the ones the actual seals used......I believe all you receive now is a 226 with an anchor on it......The true navys had the phosphate coating on the internals.......
My NSW is the first sig I've ever owned & its a great weapon. My small gripes are that the trigger is a tad gritty & heavy (not doing a trigger job...Just leaving her stock) and the sights are off a bit (seems sig makes sure they go bang but does not sight them in to well). Neither are a big deal or expense & over all I am very happy with my purchase.

All Navy's have phosphate coated internals. The NSW's were just a limited run pistol, and their rarity makes them worth slightly more.

Voo
01-13-2010, 11:01 AM
This topic literally came up the other day at the range when one of the range guys brought out a cracked 92f rental gun. The slide had cracked near the ejection port. I had never actually seen this in person so I started asking about it. My buddy (who works for the range) said he's seen the beretta fail consistently in the slide or the locking block- mostly the locking block. My other buddy who was standing (who's also an instructor for the Navy guys) says it's literally like clockwork that the Berettas will break the locking blocks. That said, he uses a Sig P226 Navy for his duty gun.

My buddies gun as well as one of the EOD guy's P226 Navy was somewhat beefier in the slide area. Both slides were the milled versions. For whatever reason, there was little more metal here and there when compared to my 'regular' p226 slide.

Ventura_Yak'r
01-13-2010, 11:08 AM
It is my understanding that todays 226 navy is not like my NSW navy and the ones the actual seals used......I believe all you receive now is a 226 with an anchor on it......The true navys had the phosphate coating on the internals.......

+1
Just a nifty anchor on stock P226 w/out phosphated internals

M1A Rifleman
01-13-2010, 11:09 AM
It is my understanding that todays 226 navy is not like my NSW navy and the ones the actual seals used......I believe all you receive now is a 226 with an anchor on it......The true navys had the phosphate coating on the internals.......
My NSW is the first sig I've ever owned & its a great weapon. My small gripes are that the trigger is a tad gritty & heavy (not doing a trigger job...Just leaving her stock) and the sights are off a bit (seems sig makes sure they go bang but does not sight them in to well). Neither are a big deal or expense & over all I am very happy with my purchase.


The 226 add from Sign indicates it is exactly the same including the special coatings. Odd that it would not have a chrome barrel like the Beretta - especially if it is used in salt water?

M1A Rifleman
01-13-2010, 11:12 AM
+1
Just a nifty anchor on stock P226 w/out phosphated internals

From Sig: The P226 Navy is identical to the pistol carried by the U.S. Navy SEALs-the fleet's special warfare operators. The railed P226 chambered in 9mm and engraved with an anchor on the left side of the slide is the official sidearm of the SEALs.

hybridatsun350
01-13-2010, 11:33 AM
+1
Just a nifty anchor on stock P226 w/out phosphated internals

The 226 add from Sign indicates it is exactly the same including the special coatings. Odd that it would not have a chrome barrel like the Beretta - especially if it is used in salt water?

From Sig: The P226 Navy is identical to the pistol carried by the U.S. Navy SEALs-the fleet's special warfare operators. The railed P226 chambered in 9mm and engraved with an anchor on the left side of the slide is the official sidearm of the SEALs.

I used to own one. They have phosphated internals. ;)

Ventura_Yak'r
01-13-2010, 12:17 PM
+1
Just a nifty anchor on stock P226 w/out phosphated internals

I stand corrected... just off the phone w/ Sig Sauer... The P226 Navy DOES have the phosphated internals. :D

GearHead
01-13-2010, 1:52 PM
For some reason this forum has a tendency to sackride the heck out of Sigs. Personally, I can't stand them and would pick the Beretta every time.

bobnfloyd
01-13-2010, 2:50 PM
For all of Sig Sauer's current management's mishandling of their engineering resources and quality control, a properly made Sig Sauer (typically older), or a well made modern one is well designed, accurate, reliable, ergonomic, and has one of the better triggers for a modern "duty" pistol.

Other guns are close in most of those areas, and may even be better in some, but for the entire package, I believe rarely do other guns/designs get as much right as Sig Sauer.

They are pricier than most guns, but it'll keep most people happy without the need to kit together a proper gun with great performance.

9mmepiphany
01-13-2010, 5:49 PM
every "226 Navy" that i've ever inspected, about 5, have had the phosphated internals...this also accounts for their "grittier" triggers. i don't personally think it's worth the price difference unless you're in the habit of exposing your guns to salt water.

BTW:
1. we have France to thank for the Beretta 92 "G" model
2. they are now using the excellent SigPro SP-2022
3. the Berettas that "failed" had to do with the locking block searing off it's ears...that was 3 generations of locking blocks ago

esskay
01-13-2010, 8:54 PM
Personally, between those two choices, I'd go for the P226 because it fits me better. I think you just need to test drive them both.

I have a Navy and love it, one of the early U prefix models. As for the trigger, it's no 1911 but is pretty smooth and I have no complaints about it. Had it setup as my defensive gun for a while but have since gone back to Glock. Also ran Sigs in competition for a little while, but not a big fan of DA/SA (same applies to the Beretta).

.40Cal
01-14-2010, 9:19 AM
From Sig: The P226 Navy is identical to the pistol carried by the U.S. Navy SEALs-the fleet's special warfare operators. The railed P226 chambered in 9mm and engraved with an anchor on the left side of the slide is the official sidearm of the SEALs.

Speaking of 226, didn't the FBI and other Govt. agencies went with .40 S&W, that replaced the 9mm...

Well, that's another topic I guess - which caliber to go with. But I hear, most police departments, FBI, etc have gone with .40 cal now...!!

M1A Rifleman
01-14-2010, 9:50 AM
[QUOTE=bobnfloyd;3635353]For all of Sig Sauer's current management's mishandling of their engineering resources and quality control, a properly made Sig Sauer (typically older), or a well made modern one is well designed, accurate, reliable, ergonomic, and has one of the better triggers for a modern "duty" pistol. QUOTE]

You have a good point here as I have heard they are having trouble. Last weekend I looked at a new 228R to see how different it was from my 1994 vintage 228. I was not happy to see that the quality of the parts fit and finish was bad. The front sight did not fit correctly, the slide and frame finish looked bad - maybe it was void of lube, but it looked bad. There were also areas where the finish was dinged off - maybe this was the from the hoobs at the gun shop. Needless to say the new 228R looked to be about the same condition as my 16-year old version with 1K rounds through it.

Crazy Train
01-14-2010, 12:51 PM
I shoot my P226R Navy better than all of my other pistols for some reason.

CWM4A1
01-14-2010, 2:09 PM
3 generations later, 92FS locking block still break after being shot enough. I have seen them so many times to a point you can’t give me a Beretta 92/96. It seems the design will cause the block to break no matter how much “improvement” they put into it. AFAIK, the real “improvement” to prevent slide crack is the Brigadier model, and there is that enlarged hammer pin on the FS model frame to prevent broken slide from flying into your face. Other than those, there is no cure to the locking block. Replace them as you see fit.

As for SIGs, I had a frame slide rail cracked once on my P228. Other than that, most of my SIGs (P226 and P228s) worked pretty good and they all keep ticking.

Newer SIG now are outfitted with MIM parts which I hate them to no end. I picked up a P220 Elite with MIM trigger and hammer and hated the trigger. Replaced with some spare original forged trigger and hammer cured the crappy trigger issue immediately.

I’d say: Get a SIG, get an old SIG in good condition if you can find one. If buying a new SIG, see if you can find some old non-MIM internals, night and day differences.

trapshot68
01-14-2010, 2:12 PM
^ that probably is the ticket I'm looking for. My friend's police trade-in german 228's trigger is soo damn slick, it's sickening. And my new 226, while smooth, isn't the glass-rod-snap like it is on the 228. I'll have to start looking.

uglyal
01-15-2010, 5:49 PM
The Sig P226 is of the finest and most durable as any pistol made by anybody ever. However the 226 Navy as mentioned above is just another Gimmick to sell more units. The 226R-9-NSWG comes with 3 mags instead of 2 and has an anchor tatooed on the slide for a wholesale cost of $30 more. The commercial version is not phosphate coated as the Navy Seals have theirs. The original model approved by CA as "safe" did not even have rails on the frame as the current model of 226 does.

Quiet
01-15-2010, 6:13 PM
I prefer the SIG P226 over the Beretta Model 92FS.
I find the SIG to be more accurate and reliable than the Beretta.

But, you should try both out before deciding.

5150bronco
01-15-2010, 6:16 PM
definitely more reliable. pic would be cool.

RT13
01-15-2010, 6:25 PM
I have a regular P226 and it is the best shooting 9mm IMO. It outshoots every 9mm I own or have tried. It's my favorite pistol out of the dozens of pistols I have and still own. No matter what P226 variance you get, you will enjoy and love it. If you want a P226 Navy, get it because its a P226 and not for the navy label on it. If the price is the same as a plain jane P226, get it. But personally I would not pay more for a Navy version. Save your money and buy a plain jane.

ditmeus
01-16-2010, 1:52 PM
I recently purchased a Navy and really enjoy it. Mine was manufactured in May of 2009 and it has phosphated internals and came with 3 mags. I got it from a member named yzernie . He doesn't have any currently but his price was way cheaper than most of the dealers around me for a nib p226. Oh if you haven't already tried, sigforum.com is a great resource for info on sigs and you can research more info about the navy as well.

t001
01-16-2010, 2:58 PM
Like the General, the few P226 Navy's I've looked at all had phosphate internals. However, they were all early non-railed samples, whether NSW- or U-serialed. It has been widely reported on well-reputed sites like the Sigforum that there are later UU-serialed P226R Navy's without phosphate internals. That they just started slapping the anchor on regular P226R's and calling them Navy's. In fact, here's one link with even Sig themselves admitting not having consistently phosphate-coated their Navy's, their own ad notwithstanding:

http://sigforum.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/430601935/m/475103241

They may have now started phosphate-coating all their railed Navy's again. I don't know. Haven't followed up on this topic lately. However, if that's what you want, I'd take a look at the actual pistol you're buying to make sure that it does. Is it critical for normal use? Probably not, but I do believe if you're advertising it as to spec, then it'd better be to spec, especially if you're charging extra for it. Even with the earlier U-serialed Navy's, some came with phosphate magazines, some didin't. Then they shipped some additional Navy's with certificates that were supposed to be limited to the original run of NSW's.

I think this is probably one example of why people have been feeling let down by Sig lately. You used to be able to have reasonable expectations of products out of Sig without having to look over every detail. Not so much these days.

BTW, the original non-railed Navy model on the CA roster WAS the configuration adopted by SEAL. I've heard it is only as the non-railed frames started wearing out that they have gone to railed frames, but I'm not in the know.