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View Full Version : National match 2 stage trigger worth it?


glock_this
12-19-2005, 8:35 AM
so, trying to decide if it is worth the money to upgrade to a National Match 2 Stage Trigger? And, will a novice even notice or benefit from it?

Gunner1
12-19-2005, 10:02 AM
For me the answer is maybe, If you are building a heavy barrel rifle that is used for punching paper or varmit use then my opinion is definately get a match trigger. For a general use carbine I don't think it is needed, the problem is that if you spend the money for a really nice match trigger on one rifle you will become spoiled and demand them for everything. The trigger on my M25 Whitefeather breaks clean at 2 lbs. About the nicest trigger I have ever used on a semi auto rifle. I just ordered a CMC single stage trigger for an upcoming deer head rifle build that I am planning:D

Gunner

glock_this
12-19-2005, 10:24 AM
well, though cost does matter, this is the only AR I plan on building up - so willing to splurge on this one to do it right. It is a tactical design rifle I am build if it matters.

capitol
12-19-2005, 10:33 AM
A great trigger pull will spoil you and make you shoot more accurately. I have worked on my own, used Chip McCormick drop in kits and then I purchased the KING. Nothing in my opinion even comes close to Jewell Triggers. They are expensive and worth every penny.

glock_this
12-19-2005, 11:06 AM
I would recommend sticking with the standard trigger for your initial build.
1) You don't seem to have much experience with the platform (Possibly not too much with rifles in general). Best to develop your skills on the stock rifle for now.
2) This is your first build and all the documentation available applies to the stock trigger. This would make trouble shooting easier if you stayed close to the original
3) Except for the Chip McCormick trigger, the RRA is the easiest to install. The others mentioned require tuning to some degree and familiarity with the stock trigger.
4) You can always upgrade later.

Thanks!
1) you are correct. not trying to hide my ignorance. I am a long time hand gun user, but never built/owned a rifle. But, I like to do the best of the best of what I can afford when I do it and plan for down the road when I have more skill and understanding. I am a quick learner and think the upgrade cost is not that huge, so I could swallow it and then i would be starting off with a top notch setup and learning on an ideal rifle.
2) did not think of that
3) RRA is the one of interest
4) true - I can just get a better price if I do it all now in 1 order

Gunner1
12-19-2005, 12:25 PM
What Ted said:D I have to agree with Technical Ted. Why not start out with the standard trigger and see what you feel about it. I am in the process of building eight AR type rifles to make up for the errors of my past in which greed got the better of me. These are staying put.
If you are planning to build a DCM (CMP now I guess) there are certain rules you need to live by, check the rule books.
For a tactical type rifle things change, In my line of work we have to play by department rules on the rifles we use. Our patrol cars have Colt carbines or Mini 14's in them. Yes we actually have officers who prefer the mini. They do seem to work o.k. but I will take the AR if I have a choice (usually I do)
Gunner getting back on track now, For a rifle that will be used in stressful conditions I would advise nothing less than a 5 lb two stage pull, In our training it is amazing how even the 6.5 lb pull of my keltec SU16ca feels like 2lbs or less when someone is screaming at you or you have just ran up five flights of stairs (especially when you are pushing 40 years old and have had a few too many meetings at the donut hut:o )
Soo to sumarize my ramblings, why not just build a standard rifle, learn to shoot it well. Spend the money you would have on the trigger on some decent ammo to practice with, Then if you feel the trigger on your rifle is holding you back for some reason of course you can change it.

Good Luck and keep us posted on your build,

Gunner

-hanko
12-19-2005, 6:25 PM
If you decide you need a serious target trigger, most Camp Perry shooters use/recommend an RRA set that's tuned up by John at www.whiteoakprecision.com

Jewell also has a good rep, not sure if McCormick's is allowed in NRA Service Rifle class.

-hanko

UberPhLuBB
12-19-2005, 8:38 PM
I'm not purchasing one yet because I want to see what the Dee Oh Jay does, but I plan on getting a 2-stage pre-tuned by White Oak Armory. I hear they feel very nice, though I cannot speak from personal experiance (yet).

-hanko
12-19-2005, 9:52 PM
From his other posts it's pretty apparent that he's building a tactical style carbine on a CA legal Vulcan lower and AFAIK, CMP service rifle class doesn't allow carbines.
;) My sense was that he might be open to another choice. You're correct about carbines in CMP; still, if you think you might sometime want to shoot CMP, an upper change would do it.


-hanko

Pthfndr
12-19-2005, 11:16 PM
I have the RRA WOP tuned triggers in 2 of my High Power AR service rifles. Excellent triggers, very smooth with a crisp break.

The one disadvantage to some of the aftermarket trigger/spring combos vs. Mil spec is that when using with surplus ammo they have been known to occassionally have light strikes on the primer - i.e. no bang - because of the reduced weight of the hammer. The Jewel especially can be prone to that. I have not had that problem with my RRA WOP trigger/hammer sets. I USED to have Jewels. Very good for competition but I would not use them in a rifle you might need to defend yourself with.

Also, FWIW, there is no such standard/spec as "National Match" AR parts. That is all marketing hype.

C.G.
12-20-2005, 1:10 AM
I would recommend sticking with the standard trigger for your initial build.
1) You don't seem to have much experience with the platform (Possibly not too much with rifles in general). Best to develop your skills on the stock rifle for now.
2) This is your first build and all the documentation available applies to the stock trigger. This would make trouble shooting easier if you stayed close to the original
3) Except for the Chip McCormick trigger, the RRA is the easiest to install. The others mentioned require tuning to some degree and familiarity with the stock trigger.
4) You can always upgrade later.

Totally concur with Ted and one plus you will have a spare trigger in your tool box. If you upgrade later, I would suggest the Chip McCormick Ted mentioned. I certainly like it and since Ted still has it on his AR, I am sure he still likes it.