PDA

View Full Version : pistols that you shoot well


vta
12-31-2009, 4:21 PM
well, the title is kind of misleading i guess. My real question is about whether or not you guys think that the brand/design/caliber of a gun is really a good excuse for someone to not shoot it well. I understand that there are physical issues with hand size and weight and balance, but I always felt like given enough time, i should be able to learn to shoot any gun well. Or in dire situations, i better learn to shoot whatever is available in a jiffy.

Are there any guns that you just can never learn to shoot well? if so, what is the reason for it?

pingpong
12-31-2009, 4:23 PM
My PT145. 3" barrel plus DA trigger makes it tough. I'm getting better, but it'll never match what I can do with my SA guns.

jermedic
12-31-2009, 4:27 PM
I think that as long as you can physically hold the gun, you can probably learn to shoot it well if given enough time. Might take days, months, or years and lots of money in ammo for some people. Obviously we all have our favorites, but at the same time almost all of us could learn a given gun with enough practice. The one time I shot a large revolver 44mag, I thougt I was gonna sprain a wrist lol. Not my favorite or first choice of guns, but given enough time I am sure I could get good control with it. As far as dire situations go, personal preferance is out the window at that point and I would shoot whatever is available.

hybridatsun350
12-31-2009, 4:27 PM
I definitely shoot some guns better than others, and I think that will always be the case. The amount of time I spend with a gun can improve how I shoot that gun, but I probably still wont shoot it as well as the guns that I inherently shoot well to begin with. If that makes any sense.

vta
12-31-2009, 4:28 PM
My PT145. 3" barrel plus DA trigger makes it tough. I'm getting better, but it'll never match what I can do with my SA guns.

I owned a PT111 Pro at one point too. I didn't do too well with it but I liked it. Sold it to fund another gun before I got good at it. I kind of wish I could have it back just so I can conquer it.

vta
12-31-2009, 4:33 PM
I definitely shoot some guns better than others, and I think that will always be the case. The amount of time I spend with a gun can improve how I shoot that gun, but I probably still wont shoot it as well as the guns that I inherently shoot well to begin with. If that makes any sense.

I think we all gravitate towards the guns we shoot well with quickly and they get more trigger time at the range because of it. It is like a viscious cycle that makes the other gun that much less desirable to shoot in comparison. You almost have to force yourself to do it to get better.

five.five-six
12-31-2009, 4:36 PM
I shoot my Davis 380 real well.... I attribute this to it's titanium firing pin

Jonathan Doe
12-31-2009, 4:39 PM
One day, I went to the range and shot several pistols in 9mm Caliber. I shot 92FS, Glock 17, Sig P226, P228, and couple of other pistols. I used Winchester 147 grain SXT and 115 grain Winclean ammo. They all shot the same group for me. The one that felt th emost comfortable in my hands were Sig P226.

forgiven
12-31-2009, 4:40 PM
I can't shoot anything straight anymore. Thank god for my Benelli.

Buddhabelly
12-31-2009, 4:42 PM
well, the title is kind of misleading i guess. My real question is about whether or not you guys think that the brand/design/caliber of a gun is really a good excuse for someone to not shoot it well. I understand that there are physical issues with hand size and weight and balance, but I always felt like given enough time, i should be able to learn to shoot any gun well. Or in dire situations, i better learn to shoot whatever is available in a jiffy.

Are there any guns that you just can never learn to shoot well? if so, what is the reason for it?

There are some guns with very good embedded ergo and trigger design that are more enabling, like the 1911's, BHP's... I can pick up any unfamiliar gun within these models and do very adequate right away.

I can't never shoot a .308 lone eagle right, no matter what I do. :o

Air
12-31-2009, 4:54 PM
I've had a lot of pistols over the years, and the two that I shoot best I still have. Colt Commander, CZ75. I have a Ruger MkIII 22/45, but that doesn't count.

vta
12-31-2009, 4:57 PM
I think we all gravitate towards the guns we shoot well with quickly and they get more trigger time at the range because of it. It is like a viscious cycle that makes the other gun that much less desirable to shoot in comparison. You almost have to force yourself to do it to get better.

One day, I went to the range and shot several pistols in 9mm Caliber. I shot 92FS, Glock 17, Sig P226, P228, and couple of other pistols. I used Winchester 147 grain SXT and 115 grain Winclean ammo. They all shot the same group for me. The one that felt th emost comfortable in my hands were Sig P226.

I think this kind of sums up my feeling about it. It should be less about which gun you shoot well but rather which one is more comfortable to you. The fundamentals and techniques are all the same from gun to gun. The 'easier' to shoot ones are just more forgiving in letting you cheat a bit with a crisper, light trigger or brighter sights. If you practice to shoot well on a gun with crappy sights, heavy and gritty trigger and no ergonomics, imagine what you could do with a good 1911.

Variable2147
12-31-2009, 5:03 PM
its not about enough time as it is about enough ammo.....

my dad (retired swat counter sniper) swore by his Glock which he had put 18,000 rds through. he was deadly accurate after years of practice. now he's a DA investigator and has to qualify with his issued Sig p229. he is continually amazed at it every 6 months when he qualifies.

so enough ammo should get you pretty proficient, but a nice pistol can definitely help.

i smoke all my buddies with my p226. and i randomly picked up a p220 never having fired one and it was like an extension of my hand.

PatriotnMore
12-31-2009, 5:05 PM
For me, when going to magnum (44) rounds, I definitely shoot different. The first couple of shots are money, then I start to react to weight and recoil. Also, a longer barrel is an advantage for me, I don't shoot the 4" groupings as well as with a 5", not that it is an extreme difference, but enough to notice.

vta
12-31-2009, 5:09 PM
I firmly believe in dry fire practice as I am sure most of you do. It is the type of trigger time any gun owner can afford.

Jonathan Doe
12-31-2009, 5:27 PM
I firmly believe in dry fire practice as I am sure most of you do. It is the type of trigger time any gun owner can afford.

Dry fire will help you.I dry fire my M-1A almost every day, mostly standing, a few times at least. When I shoot the matches, my standing score is decent, from 95 - 99/100 at 200 yards. Never shot 100. But with dry fire practice, I feel more natural with the rifle. Pistol is the same. You get to know your trigger.

NorCalMama
12-31-2009, 6:04 PM
I have a feeling most would have a hard time handling this-

MlFlXMHaSVQ

vs like, a .22, but that sort of goes without saying. So ultimately, to a degree I think that I could get comfortable with a .357, over time. However, at this point, I'm a wimp and can't handle anything above a .45 :o

bobfried
12-31-2009, 6:11 PM
Anything that can be put on Single Action will be way way easier to shoot versus a Double Action Only.

I am a great shot with almost anything out there, with my duty gun I usually shoot 350+ out of 360 but it is a PAIN to get there. It's a DAO LEM trigger (in this case I'd take a Glock trigger pull over what I have) and it's atrocious. If I could use my 1911 or anything else with a SA (SAO Glock) I could get the same score without even trying that hard.

So yes the gun does make a huge difference in how you shoot. And I have only discussed trigger, we're not even talking about comparing something like a .22 1911 versus a .460s&w revolver.

andalusi
12-31-2009, 6:20 PM
I definitely shoot some guns better than others, and I think that will always be the case. The amount of time I spend with a gun can improve how I shoot that gun, but I probably still wont shoot it as well as the guns that I inherently shoot well to begin with. If that makes any sense.

Makes sense to me. I think that's true for me, too.

vta
12-31-2009, 6:25 PM
I think when I started the thread I had in mind all the people who talk about how they can't shoot a glock or a xd or a sigma etc.. I guess I was thinking about more combat caliber autoloaders and the kinds of excuses people make about grip angle, size trigger and the like.

if we start getting into hard recoiling calibers, obviously the matters are significantly different.

ZepoL
12-31-2009, 6:29 PM
My best handgun was the SIG P220. I have to pick up another one.

Swift Justice
12-31-2009, 6:36 PM
Gun that I could never shoot - H&K VP70z - squeeze cocks through a straight trigger. Takes the finger/wrist muscles of a Hercules to do it. Don't know what the trigger pull was, but it was horrendous.

I bought one brand new in the eighties, put about 150 rounds through it, and then it sat in my safe for 25 years before I finally sold it during a safe cleaning spat.

Although it was an intriguing design and way ahead of its time (18 round magazine, field strips in about 3 seconds, first polymer frame production pistol pistol [take that, Glock]), it never caught on and I don't know to this day anyone that held on to theirs.

k1dude
12-31-2009, 8:11 PM
I have a Taurus 669 .357 that I can't hit the broadside of a barn with. My friends can drive tacks with it. All my other revolvers and semi-auto's I shoot fine. Not that Taurus. I'm literally a foot or two off the mark at 15 yards. I have no idea why I can't shoot it and my friends can't figure out why either.

23 Blast
12-31-2009, 9:00 PM
Handguns of mine that I shoot well (and thus have an affinity for): Cz-75b, S&W66, 1911.

Guns that I have to work hard to hit the target with ( and thus don't like quite as much): Sig P220, Beretta 92fs, Makarov.

redcliff
12-31-2009, 9:00 PM
I can shoot any handgun well, but better ergonomics, better sights and good trigger pulls allow me to shoot even better. Which is why the modified 1911 is my personal choice for a go-to pistol.

People that shoot handguns with poor triggers and poor ergonomics are not shooting to their potential.

dchang0
12-31-2009, 9:25 PM
I think when I started the thread I had in mind all the people who talk about how they can't shoot a glock or a xd or a sigma etc.. I guess I was thinking about more combat caliber autoloaders and the kinds of excuses people make about grip angle, size trigger and the like.

if we start getting into hard recoiling calibers, obviously the matters are significantly different.

Sometimes it comes down to crappy ergonomics, even in a small caliber. For instance, I had a .380 pistol whose large slide release happened to be in a really bad location. It would rub/jab/irritate the exact same spot on my hand, just inside my thumb, leaving it raw by the end of every shooting session, and there was very little I could do to alleviate the problem without basically ruining my grip on the pistol.

Needless to say, it was impossible not to develop a flinch shooting that pistol. And as a result, I couldn't shoot it accurately at all, so I sold it fairly quickly. It also happened to be blowback (high felt recoil) and DAO, so that made matters worse.

gearhead15
12-31-2009, 9:56 PM
Some pistols are just an extension of your arm. I bought a very well-used (over 2000 rounds) test model FNP-9 from my employer, it had been used to qualify the pistol for the Irish police I believe. Anyway, I needed an inexpensive, relatively lightweight, reliable pistol to use in the CCW qualification class they held at work and the FNP fit the bill. First time I ever fired it with live ammo rather than a snap cap was in the class and it was the first time I had fired a pistol in 35 years. I put 43 of 50 inside the 9 ring at 7 to 25 yards range. My instructor didn't believe me when I told him I hadn't been practicing at the range. The FNP just felt comfortable to me and pointed naturally. I'm not that accurate with the J-frame revolver I bought for my wife's side of the bed...

otteray
12-31-2009, 10:50 PM
S&W Model 57 .41 Mag http://i47.photobucket.com/albums/f179/otteray/41mag/Revolver003.jpgand .44 S&W Mountain Gun are off hand tack driver for me with Old West Bullet Moulds' 260 gr and 270 gr SWC (respectively) so's a Ruger .44 Super Blackhawk.
Then again, Springfield GI is too, with Lee's 230gr SWC with some Unique behind it.
Can't shoot the S&W 4th Change 1905 32-20 worth a dime, though, or the Colt SAA (dob 1906) with the rear notch sight.http://i47.photobucket.com/albums/f179/otteray/Colt%20SAA/Newfrontsight.jpghttp://i47.photobucket.com/albums/f179/otteray/unclassified/IMG_0496-1.jpg
http://i47.photobucket.com/albums/f179/otteray/unclassified/IMG_0494.jpg

http://i47.photobucket.com/albums/f179/otteray/Colt%20SAA/colt.jpg

Rob454
01-01-2010, 8:09 AM
I can shoot my ruger P90 and P85 better than I could ever shoot my P345, XD or beretta. I wasnt bad with the XD P345 or beretta but I had a larger pattern thanI did with the 90 and 85.

bsg
01-01-2010, 11:57 AM
feels best and shoots best is not always the same for me; my w german P225 feels the best but i shoot the best with my w german P226....

RUM
01-01-2010, 12:02 PM
This was interesting to me. Recently I had to take a ccw course and firing numerous different calibers/models was part of it. There were ten different stations with different guns at each. We had ten people ranging from two females that never touched a gun to guys there for ccw renewal. Each person shot ten rnds from each station and then moved to the next and so on, all at the same targets. Guns ranged from .22 MkIII, S&W38, .357, .40, 9mm .45. When everyone was done, the glock 9mm (not sure what model) target, shot by ten dif. people, was by far the smallest group of 100 shots, probably 1/2 the size of the other nine. I dont own a Glock, but I am sure going to be considering one my next purchase.

bsg
01-01-2010, 12:02 PM
but i LOVE my w german P220 the most!

gwl
01-01-2010, 12:17 PM
In .45ACP it would be my 1911s and in 9mm it would be my CZs.

BamBam-31
01-01-2010, 12:25 PM
As long as the trigger isn't horribly heavy and gritty, I can pretty much shoot most pistols accurately. 1911's, Glocks, Sigs, etc., they're all good. I could never shoot the HK P7M8 very well, however. Check that--I could shoot it well, but it messed up the way I shot w/ all my other pistols. For some reason, the squeeze-cocker threw me off just enough to affect my accuracy w/ it. I wasn't terrible w/ it, but I should have been much more accurate w/ the fixed barrel design. So I sold it.

supersonic
01-01-2010, 2:54 PM
none of 'em!:p Actually, as far as putting the bullet hole right where I want it consistently, nothing seems to work like a 1911 in my hands. It was just designed to be an extension of ones own arm. That's why JMB's design(s) are timeless & still so friggin' relevant in the 21st century. In a perfect world, his great, great, great grandchildren would be set for life, financially. God bless his genius soul.

Ike Arumba
01-01-2010, 4:39 PM
So far, the Beretta Px4. With it, I recently put 8 of 10 shots into contiguous holes at 8 yards, with the other 2 within a centimeter of the gang. I'd never done that before. But I haven't been at it for long, and it sometimes seems like the answer is "the full-sized pistol that I shot most recently". I guess that means I'm getting better!