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View Full Version : Embarassing, but I'd like to know...


NorCalMama
12-04-2009, 7:22 PM
Why the hell does the brass always fly up and hit me on the head when I go shooting??? Seriously, it seems no matter what, if I'm at an indoor range, I get hit on the head numerous times. It doesn't hurt or anything, it's just annoying!

bballwizard05
12-04-2009, 7:23 PM
better bouncing off the head than my poor gf. A 7.62 shell hit her cheek and dropped into her lap leaving a burn on her legs for a few days! I felt bad... granted I did tell her to wear pants. It was a hot day. Getting hit is just one of those annoying things I guess... Get a Military helmet and just tell people you like to go all out? :)

sspen003
12-04-2009, 7:26 PM
Why the hell does the brass always fly up and hit me on the head when I go shooting??? Seriously, it seems no matter what, if I'm at an indoor range, I get hit on the head numerous times. It doesn't hurt or anything, it's just annoying!

Stand on the opposite side of the ejector

battleship
12-04-2009, 7:32 PM
Buy a Walther P5 they eject from the left side. How tall are you. this might have something to do with it, shell casings have been known to land on my head even a few down the back of my shirt but its rare.

Well theres always the Revolver option.

Tumerboy
12-04-2009, 7:36 PM
better bouncing off the head than my poor gf. A 7.62 shell hit her cheek and dropped into her lap leaving a burn on her legs for a few days! I felt bad... granted I did tell her to wear pants. It was a hot day. Getting hit is just one of those annoying things I guess... Get a Military helmet and just tell people you like to go all out? :)

If you take girls shooting, make sure they dress for the occasion. I had a girl I knew in a tank top get a worse burn. . .

bballwizard05
12-04-2009, 7:42 PM
If you take girls shooting, make sure they dress for the occasion. I had a girl I knew in a tank top get a worse burn. . .

I tried! and i dont want to poke at women in the WOMANS FORUM! but sometimes you know how women can be :) she didnt think it was needed... oh well.

five.five-six
12-04-2009, 7:44 PM
it's to keep you on your toes

NorCalMama
12-04-2009, 7:46 PM
Buy a Walther P5 they eject from the left side. How tall are you. this might have something to do with it, shell casings have been known to land on my head even a few down the back of my shirt but its rare.

Well theres always the Revolver option.

I'm about 5'7"...


AND, just a note, I dress appropriately when I go shooting. Long sleeves or at the least never any tank tops, and no open toed shoes or flip flops or anything.

tacticalcity
12-04-2009, 8:16 PM
Your own gun is throwing brass at you, or the person next to you?

The person's ammo next to you is likely to fly your way. You can avoid this by simply talking to them and asking to take turns shooting, or by moving to a stall with nobody next to you.

If your own gun is tossing brass into your own head, I think you mght just be doing something wrong with regards to stance, position, something...I've had it happen maybe once or twice, usually after bouncing off a post nearby. Now getting hit with other people's casings, pretty common.

NorCalMama
12-04-2009, 8:22 PM
Your own gun is throwing brass at you, or the person next to you?

The person's ammo next to you is likely to fly your way. You can avoid this by simply talking to them and asking to take turns shooting, or by moving to a stall with nobody next to you.

If your own gun is tossing brass into your own head, I think you're probably doing something wrong with regards to stance, position, something...I've had it happen maybe once or twice, usually after bouncing off a post nearby.

My gun. I know it's bounced off the wall of the little stall, but it's happened while shooting outside in the open as well...

five.five-six
12-04-2009, 8:24 PM
buy a revolver

problem solved

tacticalcity
12-04-2009, 8:26 PM
Huh? Have an instructor check your stance and how you're holding the weapon just to check. Maybe it's just the nature of that gun. Don't know what to tell you other than that. Never really had that problem. Then again I'm a short guy, 5'8"...but if you're really pretty then I'll stand on my toes and we'll call it 5"9" ;)

NorCalMama
12-04-2009, 8:27 PM
buy a revolver

problem solved

Ugh, I know, that would do it, but I bought a Glock! lol

tacticalcity
12-04-2009, 8:29 PM
I shoot a Glock as well...so it's not a normal thing in my experience. Love Glocks. If it happens just every once in a while it is probably not a big deal. But double checking your stance and how you're holding the weapon is always a good idea anyways. I've found bad habbits creaping in can cause lots of wierd things to happen. Then again, maybe its just one of those fluke things.

6172crew
12-04-2009, 9:01 PM
A good smith can tune the extractor on a 1911. Not sure what your shooting.

masameet
12-04-2009, 9:28 PM
Dang. For a girl you sure do complain. First you say we women can't stand for sh|t when firing a handgun. Now you say you can't stand your hot empty brass.

Me, I love it when my hot brass fly and occasionally drop down on me. I love the smell and the occasional sting of burned gunpowder. I love the boom bang noise my pistols make and the even bigger boom bang sounds other guys' firearms make. I love the recoil of my pistols. And I sure love being invited to shoot other guys' guns, their pistols and rifles.

Nothing like it in this world -- shooting, hitting the target where you aim it, and getting good at it all.

NorCalMama
12-04-2009, 9:53 PM
Dang. For a girl you sure do complain. First you say we women can't stand for sh|t when firing a handgun. Now you say you can't stand your hot empty brass.

Me, I love it when my hot brass fly and occasionally drop down on me. I love the smell and the occasional sting of burned gunpowder. I love the boom bang noise my pistols make and the even bigger boom bang sounds other guys' firearms make. I love the recoil of my pistols. And I sure love being invited to shoot other guys' guns, their pistols and rifles.

Nothing like it in this world -- shooting, hitting the target where you aim it, and getting good at it all.

Not complaining, I'm just askin! :) And I never said we stand funny when firing handguns, we just stand funny while shooting period, unless someone points it out and helps us correct it. Women DO lean back naturally. I did at first. It's normal... And like you, I LOVE to shoot. Personally, after shooting my husband's AR I think that will be the next gun I get. Right now I'm looking forward to getting my Glock once the wait is up. Hence why I'm asking stuff now so when my gun gets here I'll be semi "prepared". Hey, give me a break, I'm pretty damn new to shooting so I'm feeling things out.

OHOD
12-04-2009, 10:20 PM
Why the hell does the brass always fly up and hit me on the head when I go shooting??? Seriously, it seems no matter what, if I'm at an indoor range, I get hit on the head numerous times. It doesn't hurt or anything, it's just annoying!

It's because you're a "brass magnet". ;)

sspen003
12-04-2009, 10:22 PM
Google cat-fight. Upper right.

Backinblack1234
12-04-2009, 11:01 PM
My friends dad's Glock spits the brass out on my head. I like to see how different firearms spit out the brass cause its amusing.

tacticalcity
12-04-2009, 11:15 PM
Worst case wear a baseball cap. The pony tail through the opening in the back of the hat...nice.

joepamjohn
12-05-2009, 4:53 PM
If you take girls shooting, make sure they dress for the occasion. I had a girl I knew in a tank top get a worse burn. . .

I bet you offered to reach down that shirt to get the shell too! :p

Mikeb
12-05-2009, 4:57 PM
Ah well look at the bright side...Better to be hit by the brass than the other end of the round.
take care
Mike

masameet
12-06-2009, 6:06 PM
Want to add to my prior post, because it was said in what amounts to ignorance.

For today I discovered at the local range that two things control (but not completely) where spent casings eject from a semi-automatic pistol: (1) the grain of the ammo and (2) the spring on the rod.

Don't really have the concepts completely but this is what I understand right now: Lower-grain ammo provides less energy and thus velocity as the spent casing ejects. A spring's tension (apparently it is measured in pounds; the higher the weight, the higher the tension) also determines where and how far the empty casing goes. If the spring is weighted high (say, 18 pounds if we're taking .45) and the ammo grain is also high (230 gr.), the trajectory might also be far. Apparently the converse is true too. The thing for the shooter is to find a balance between the spring and the ammo's grain, which also apparently contribute to a shooter's target acquisition.

Meety Peety
12-06-2009, 6:30 PM
Hey at least they hit your head! I had a pistol that OFTEN would throw casings down my girlfriend's shirt.. which as you can imagine leaves them pinned between the skin and the shirt resulting in several little scars from burns. :26:

It would happen every 50 rounds or so, sometimes even more frequently.. however it was ONLY with that pistol, which was known for having issues with ejection. Needless to say I got rid of that gun pretty fast.

RogueSniper
12-06-2009, 9:16 PM
Maybe you're using the wrong sights? :D I'm kidding!
http://www.smh.com.au/ffximage/2006/08/22/sideways_gun_sight.jpg

I have a Glock 22, and I'll shoot factory 180gr or my light reloads (also 180gr). In either case, empty cases will eject up and to the right. I have the occasional vertical ejection and if I'm not wearing a hat, it'll bounce off the top of my head (ouch) or it'll drop right into my safety glasses (OUCH!!!). As someone suggested, have someone stand behind you and observe your stance and your grip. If the range is okay with it, video it (camera phone/flip it/cam). You might be able to figure it out. It may be the way you're reacting to the felt recoil and flipping your wrist just slight to change the trajectory of the empty case.

CenterX
12-06-2009, 9:24 PM
Try not to fish-pole. Fish-pole is when there is muzzle flip.
Keep the muzzle down and lined up on target by increasing your grip strength.
Keep us posted on what you discover.

El Gato
12-06-2009, 9:42 PM
Why the hell does the brass always fly up and hit me on the head when I go shooting??? Seriously, it seems no matter what, if I'm at an indoor range, I get hit on the head numerous times. It doesn't hurt or anything, it's just annoying!

The power of the load, how you hold the gun, tighter/firmer being better, the tune of the ejector all factor into where the gun eject the case...as an instructor with my dept. I can tell when a female is having "grip" issues by the way the brass flies all over the range rather than depositing in one basic spot...If it hits you in the same spot of the head every time, then it is more than likely an ejector tuning issue... if it happens with most guns, could it be the brass hitting the sidewall of the stall and then hitting you?

LG1980
12-06-2009, 9:44 PM
Actually, I'm pretty sure you're not the only one this happens to. I have a faint scar on my cheek because a hot shell popped off and got stuck between my safety glasses and my skin. Burned off the top layer, and hurt like a M F*()$%!!! I've learned to wear appropriate clothing, since shell down my chest is not my idea of fun, plus I've never been to a warm range, even in summer. So, to me, it's inevitable. I've had shells hit me from the next lane.
So, appropriate clothing as preparation, and a good attitude and sense of humor... is good to bring along. :)

caoboy
12-07-2009, 12:43 AM
It's because you need to quit shooting like a gangster.

RogueSniper
12-07-2009, 12:02 PM
The power of the load, how you hold the gun, tighter/firmer being better, the tune of the ejector all factor into where the gun eject the case...as an instructor with my dept. I can tell when a female is having "grip" issues by the way the brass flies all over the range rather than depositing in one basic spot...If it hits you in the same spot of the head every time, then it is more than likely an ejector tuning issue... if it happens with most guns, could it be the brass hitting the sidewall of the stall and then hitting you?

I think El Gato has pretty much diagnosis the brass issue.
Another question would be, how are your shot groups? If you're doing something out of the ordinary, wouldn't the groups be kind of hinky, too?

1 SIG fan
12-07-2009, 2:35 PM
Hmmm. maybe thats why gangsters use the patented one handed downward angled style.. Throws brass at the ground

ck867
12-07-2009, 2:48 PM
my roommate's kimber 1911 does this occasionally where the brass will extract and hit him in the forehead :D

jb7706
12-07-2009, 2:59 PM
Ugh, I know, that would do it, but I bought a Glock! lol

I'd bet money you are "limp wristing" your gun. Concentrate on locking your wrists the next time you shoot. If you stop the muzzle from flipping up as much you will start seeing your brass fly up and to the right.

tacticalcity
12-07-2009, 3:38 PM
If you take one of those 2 or 4 day courses from a really good school they would iron out any wrinkles in your shooting, and if still it happened after that, then it's an issue with the gun. Those classes are always fun so it's a win win. You leave a totally studdet, and you figure out what the issue is. The women usually out performed most the men at all the classes I have ever taken. Even when they are nervious noobs and the men have past training. Don't know why, but they do. I really enjoy those courses, so I am suggesting them because they are fun, not because I think you're a terrible shooter or anything like that. I just know they helped me kick a few bad habbits in the past that made me a better shot. So why not?

Seesm
12-07-2009, 4:13 PM
Ahh your lucky? JK your doing the right stuff wearing the right stuff.

rkt88edmo
12-07-2009, 4:32 PM
Want to add to my prior post, because it was said in what amounts to ignorance.

For today I discovered at the local range that two things control (but not completely) where spent casings eject from a semi-automatic pistol: (1) the grain of the ammo and (2) the spring on the rod.


Maybe more the velocity of the slide (which varies based on the bullet grain/load) and also how much give you have in your wrists when shooting which is related to your grip/stance/strength.

brass in the face/on the head often means "limp wristing" unless the gun is designed to eject up.

SkiDevil
12-08-2009, 12:21 AM
Why the hell does the brass always fly up and hit me on the head when I go shooting??? Seriously, it seems no matter what, if I'm at an indoor range, I get hit on the head numerous times. It doesn't hurt or anything, it's just annoying!

I read through the thread briefly. You mention a Glock pistol, is this the gun you are shooting when the brass strikes your head?

If so, I have seen several Glock pistols that have done this as well. The last one I observed with a similar ejection pattern was a 2nd generation Glock 19 9mm pistol. The pistol would consistently eject the fired brass casings into the vicinity of the face/ forehead area on the body.

The simple solution is to have a qualified individual replace the extractor. For a Glock pistol it is a relatively simple matter. If you cannot find someone to complete the repair (too expensive, far away, etc.), then send the pistol to Glock. They will likely repair the pistol at no charge, less shipping to the factory.

SkiDevil

P.S. If it is the pistol, then when another shooter fires the gun it should exhibit a similar ejection pattern and strike the individual firing the gun in the face/ forehead as well. Also, if someone were limp-wristing the pistol, it would likely malfunction (failure to feed/ stovepipe) with an improper or inconsistent grip.

Do yourself a major favor, if you are a beginning pistol shooter. Invest in a few shooting lessons with a certified/ or qualified instructor. It will save a lot of aggravation and put you on the road to become a more proficient shooter down the road.

KaTooM
12-08-2009, 1:00 AM
I'd bet money you are "limp wristing" your gun. Concentrate on locking your wrists the next time you shoot. If you stop the muzzle from flipping up as much you will start seeing your brass fly up and to the right.


+1

If you limp wrist a Glock at least my G23 bad enough it will stove pipe the casing as well sometimes. Do a search over at Glock talk (limp wrist) you will get lots of hits.

dirtnap
12-08-2009, 7:26 AM
Actually, I'm pretty sure you're not the only one this happens to. I have a faint scar on my cheek because a hot shell popped off and got stuck between my safety glasses and my skin. Burned off the top layer, and hurt like a M F*()$%!!!

Hey, we have matching scars. :chris: IMO It's the badge that shows you are a dedicated shooter. :D

jb7706
12-08-2009, 12:06 PM
+1

If you limp wrist a Glock at least my G23 bad enough it will stove pipe the casing as well sometimes. Do a search over at Glock talk (limp wrist) you will get lots of hits.

True enough. Easy and low cost test is to let an experienced pistol shooter fire your pistol with your ammo. If it works fine for him/her it's not an equipment issue. In my experience most problems with stock Glocks are user induced. Fix the person and the gun runs fine. YMMV.

Meplat
12-08-2009, 3:52 PM
In my limited experience with Glocks they eject slightly forward and to the right. If you are hitting what you are shooting at and not having functioning problems I would not tinker with my grip, stance, or form. I would try hotter or milder loads, proly hotter. And or different bullet weights.

Not complaining, I'm just askin! :) And I never said we stand funny when firing handguns, we just stand funny while shooting period, unless someone points it out and helps us correct it. Women DO lean back naturally. I did at first. It's normal... And like you, I LOVE to shoot. Personally, after shooting my husband's AR I think that will be the next gun I get. Right now I'm looking forward to getting my Glock once the wait is up. Hence why I'm asking stuff now so when my gun gets here I'll be semi "prepared". Hey, give me a break, I'm pretty damn new to shooting so I'm feeling things out.

Meplat
12-08-2009, 4:01 PM
I once had a Raven (Ya, I know, My bad) that always would go for the forehead or the cleavage if it ejected at all. I melted it down and made lead free deer hunting bullets out of it.:43:

Hey at least they hit your head! I had a pistol that OFTEN would throw casings down my girlfriend's shirt.. which as you can imagine leaves them pinned between the skin and the shirt resulting in several little scars from burns. :26:

It would happen every 50 rounds or so, sometimes even more frequently.. however it was ONLY with that pistol, which was known for having issues with ejection. Needless to say I got rid of that gun pretty fast.

Meplat
12-08-2009, 4:15 PM
As a former shooting coach I can tell you the reason is between the ears. 99.99% of all males born in the united states think they are naturally born with a shooting gene. At the first sign of anything less than John Wayne performance their dick starts to shrink and they draw into a 'I can do this, I don't need any help' shell.

The girls say; "Hay this is fun, how can I do it better?"




If you take one of those 2 or 4 day courses from a really good school they would iron out any wrinkles in your shooting, and if still it happened after that, then it's an issue with the gun. Those classes are always fun so it's a win win. You leave a totally studdet, and you figure out what the issue is. The women usually out performed most the men at all the classes I have ever taken. Even when they are nervious noobs and the men have past training. Don't know why, but they do. I really enjoy those courses, so I am suggesting them because they are fun, not because I think you're a terrible shooter or anything like that. I just know they helped me kick a few bad habbits in the past that made me a better shot. So why not?

Meplat
12-08-2009, 4:26 PM
It's not always just limp wristing. The lesser mass of the average female upper body, no matter how strong the grip, presents less reaction mass to counter recoil. That in turn makes for a 'softer' recoil cycle. It may be counter intuitive but girls probably will usually benefit from hotter loads than guys. adjusting loads is a lot less expensive than ejector and spring tuning by an (hopefully) expert.

Maybe more the velocity of the slide (which varies based on the bullet grain/load) and also how much give you have in your wrists when shooting which is related to your grip/stance/strength.

brass in the face/on the head often means "limp wristing" unless the gun is designed to eject up.

masameet
12-09-2009, 10:35 AM
Maybe more the velocity of the slide (which varies based on the bullet grain/load) and also how much give you have in your wrists when shooting which is related to your grip/stance/strength.

brass in the face/on the head often means "limp wristing" unless the gun is designed to eject up.

Well, the slide is just a hunk of metal. It won't do anything without the spring. And apparently the force it expends in sliding forward as the spent casing ejects is dependent on the weight of the spring.

My S&W 1911's spring is prolly weighted at 18 pounds (two gunsmiths' opinion). The spring on the gunsmith's Springfield Armory 1911 is 14 pounds. The difference can be felt just on racking the slide. But it's after the pistol is fired that the true difference is found in terms of where the spent casing ejects. Esp. if the ammo grain/velocity is high.

Anyway last year when I began saving my brass, I began to notice where they fell. I think it's important for every shooter to note where their brass drops if they want to go further in their shooting beyond just hitting paper.

And if you ever spend time with guys who shoot action pistols, you'll find how much they pay attention to little things like the weight of their pistols' springs and the grain in their reloads. It's all about being accurate with their pistols (not to mention being fast).

masameet
12-09-2009, 10:44 AM
Not complaining, I'm just askin! :) And I never said we stand funny when firing handguns, we just stand funny while shooting period, unless someone points it out and helps us correct it. Women DO lean back naturally. I did at first. It's normal... And like you, I LOVE to shoot. Personally, after shooting my husband's AR I think that will be the next gun I get. Right now I'm looking forward to getting my Glock once the wait is up. Hence why I'm asking stuff now so when my gun gets here I'll be semi "prepared". Hey, give me a break, I'm pretty damn new to shooting so I'm feeling things out.

I was just giving you a hard time. :)

[Shrug] In the past year I took a couple of male friends to the range. Their natural stance was to lean back as well. So I would say it is not a gender issue. A little coaching of the basics helps most people. Repetition and practicing right drive the basics home. And then as we progress, we meet other firearms coaches/experienced shooters who show us more and suggest we try this and that.

You could also read older threads. Plenty of people have asked the questions you have asked and might well ask. We all started as beginners too. You could also observe other shooters at the range and ask questions of the shooters who impress you.

Super Spy
12-09-2009, 11:01 AM
Stop holding the gun Gangsta style and shoot it right!
Just kidding!

indetrucks
12-09-2009, 11:25 AM
are you right handed shooting a left handed gun?
are you left handed shooting a right handed gun?

1911whore
12-09-2009, 12:16 PM
Nor Cal,

What are you shooting? There are most likely 2 easy fixes.

1. typically guns are oversprung from the factory, slightly reduced recoil spring with change the ejection pattern
2. manipulation of the ejector to change the pattern of ejection.


the third possibility, but not too likely is grip and stance.

Gryff
12-09-2009, 3:59 PM
There are a lot of crap answers in this thread. Is this really how we want to encourage women to participate more on the board? I know most of these would have never been tolerated in the LEO forum.

That being said, to the original OP...have you let anyone else shoot the Glock to see if the extraction pattern is the same for them? Glocks aren't designed to launch their empties up and back at the shooter. I know that neither of my wife's G34s nor her G26 does this to her.

Steyrlp10
12-10-2009, 12:50 PM
There are a lot of crap answers in this thread. Is this really how we want to encourage women to participate more on the board? I know most of these would have never been tolerated in the LEO forum.

That being said, to the original OP...have you let anyone else shoot the Glock to see if the extraction pattern is the same for them? Glocks aren't designed to launch their empties up and back at the shooter. I know that neither of my wife's G34s nor her G26 does this to her.


Thanks much, Gryff.

SomeDayMrs.Z
01-08-2010, 8:08 AM
My advise would be to always wear a hat( baseball cap) , ..better safe than sorry a hat will not only protect your face but your head too ... i learned that after the first time i went shooting and the shells kept hitting either my face or chest area:p Now when i shoot i try to wear a hat and long sleeve shirt...........NRA hats usually work best lol J/K:D

Mstnpete
01-08-2010, 8:14 AM
I would suggest to replace and change your EXTRACTOR on your Glock. This normally happens if you have a bad EXTRACTOR.
Change it to a new one and this will eliminate the problem.
I shoot competitively and use my Glocks for Limited division IPSC shooting. When the shells starts flying and hitting me on the head that means it is time to replace the EXTRACTOR.

Here's a diagram on how to replace the Extractor:

http://www.topglock.com/content.aspx?ckey=extractor

Sorry you had to go thru the stupid answers people gave you.
This should correct the issue.

Peter

FloridaEllie
01-08-2010, 8:47 AM
If you take girls shooting, make sure they dress for the occasion. I had a girl I knew in a tank top get a worse burn. . .

I think I'm ready for my next time to the range! Haha
http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/attachment.php?attachmentid=42077&d=1262801423

FloridaEllie
01-08-2010, 8:50 AM
I'm about 5'7"...


AND, just a note, I dress appropriately when I go shooting. Long sleeves or at the least never any tank tops, and no open toed shoes or flip flops or anything.

Hi NorCamMamma - I wasn't hit on the head at all. I'm only 5'4" so maybe the bullets were going over my head! LOL

Steyrlp10
01-08-2010, 12:32 PM
I think I'm ready for my next time to the range! Haha
http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/attachment.php?attachmentid=42077&d=1262801423

Lol -- you're ready for tournament bass fishing too!

NorCalMama
01-08-2010, 5:04 PM
Hi NorCamMamma - I wasn't hit on the head at all. I'm only 5'4" so maybe the bullets were going over my head! LOL

LOL :p

OlderThanDirt
01-14-2010, 2:05 PM
Why the hell does the brass always fly up and hit me on the head when I go shooting??? Seriously, it seems no matter what, if I'm at an indoor range, I get hit on the head numerous times. It doesn't hurt or anything, it's just annoying!

Maybe you have a fat head?

Actually, I had a 45 that did the same thing when it was new. Since I have several 45s, hold them all the same and was shooting the same ammo, it came down to something specific to this particular 45. The problem abated after shooting about 100 rounds, so I suspect it was related to spring stiffness and/or lubrication. If nothing else, I like the "WCC 71" tattoo on my forehead.

bruss01
01-14-2010, 4:24 PM
The pistol would consistently eject the fired brass casings into the vicinity of the face/ forehead area on the body.

The simple solution is to have a qualified individual replace the extractor. For a Glock pistol it is a relatively simple matter. If you cannot find someone to complete the repair (too expensive, far away, etc.), then send the pistol to Glock. They will likely repair the pistol at no charge, less shipping to the factory.


I have two CZ's that have exhibited this behavior. One went away for work and got (among other tweaks) a new extractor spring. The pistol no longer flings brass back at your face/head. Just saying, maybe it's just a spring.

jlh95811
08-28-2010, 9:54 PM
Might be a bit late but I don't see a post from you saying you found the issue. I am by no means an expert but I can tell you why I get hit every now and then...
1.Too little pressure on left side of gun for a right handed shooter.
2. Limt wrist.
Both cause the same effect on the recoil. Gun goes up and left. I've hit myself in the head with brass a number of times doing this. Mostly when shooting right hand only with no support hand. It usually happens to me on the last shot because I anticipate it being the last shot and tend to relax too quickly. I.E. Bad follow through by me.

Lead Waster
09-24-2010, 11:09 AM
I took a friend shooting, she was wearing a nice clean white Calvin Klein (or whatever fancy pants label it was) shirt and a .22 case landed on the shirt and left a stain...oops!

I always wear saftey glasses that cover the top of the lenses...one time I was shooting and an ejected 9mm case fly up, bounced off the partition and landed on the INSIDE OF MY GLASSES! It left a little welt on my upper cheek, right under my eye, it was trapped between my "regular" glasses and my face because it somehow managed to snake down between the shooting glasses and my glasses. It's hard to deal with too because you are holding a gun, so you have to put it down properly then tear off two pairs of glasses! Lesson learned!

I also wear my "shooting jacket" which is a 20 year old ratty spring jacket that I have that helps me not freeze in ventilated indoor ranges, but also keeps the smell and residue of burnt gunpowder off my clothes!

d4v0s
09-24-2010, 12:29 PM
I witnessed my cousin (a girl if that matters) shooting my xd.40 and somehow she was hitting herself with a piece of brass every once in a while, Turns out occasionally she would flinch big time, close her eyes and let her left hand drop, thus cocking the gun a few degrees over and then the shells would fly on a high arc and drop near her. by the time she opened her eyes the gun was back to normal, and she would be wondering what happened.

Also could be a faulty extractor in the pistol you were shooting, i thought i would just offer something i saw, she didnt realize it till i walked her through the stance, and how to properly hold a handgun (she was teacupping it like she sees in movies)

Last time out she was nailing lemons and limes with a .308 remington 700p at 100 yards. a far cry from that .22 her dad taught her to shoot. I also got her into riding dirt bikes :)

tacticalcity
09-24-2010, 2:38 PM
Well, the slide is just a hunk of metal. It won't do anything without the spring. And apparently the force it expends in sliding forward as the spent casing ejects is dependent on the weight of the spring.

My S&W 1911's spring is prolly weighted at 18 pounds (two gunsmiths' opinion). The spring on the gunsmith's Springfield Armory 1911 is 14 pounds. The difference can be felt just on racking the slide. But it's after the pistol is fired that the true difference is found in terms of where the spent casing ejects. Esp. if the ammo grain/velocity is high.

Anyway last year when I began saving my brass, I began to notice where they fell. I think it's important for every shooter to note where their brass drops if they want to go further in their shooting beyond just hitting paper.

And if you ever spend time with guys who shoot action pistols, you'll find how much they pay attention to little things like the weight of their pistols' springs and the grain in their reloads. It's all about being accurate with their pistols (not to mention being fast).

Your interpretation of how the slide works only holds true if the frame of the firearm is held perfectly still. A human being is not a vice, and thus the shooter can monkey it up. Your stance, grip, etc. dramatically effect how the slide functions. Semi-auto firearms need you to provide a solid platform of resistance to recoil against in order to function properly. If you give it room to move (not just backwards but in other directions as well) you can run into all kinds of goofy problems. I am not saying you are wrong, I am just saying do not discount how the human element factors into the equation.

I am not saying it is not a mechanical problem. I am saying that rushing to the conclusion that it is a mechanical problem is a bad idea without first eliminating the more likely scenario that the shooter is doing something wrong. After all, we're only human so we are all doing something wrong. Odds are we are doing a lot of things wrong even with a lot of training. Immediately starting to swap out parts without ruling out improper shooting techniques is a good way to waste a lot of money.

It certainly sounds like it could be a bad extractor. However, I can also see how a consistent but improper grip, stance, etc. could cause something like this to happen. Do the same thing wrong consistently, and you get consistently bad results.

Having an instructor fire your weapon, say 2-3 mags worth, to see if it happens to them is the easiest way to know for certain if there is a real problem. They have the skill set not to repeat any human errors she might be making.

If the instructor does not experience the same issues, then problem solved. The shooter needs to get some professional training.

tacticalcity
09-24-2010, 2:52 PM
Might be a bit late but I don't see a post from you saying you found the issue. I am by no means an expert but I can tell you why I get hit every now and then...
1.Too little pressure on left side of gun for a right handed shooter.
2. Limt wrist.
Both cause the same effect on the recoil. Gun goes up and left. I've hit myself in the head with brass a number of times doing this. Mostly when shooting right hand only with no support hand. It usually happens to me on the last shot because I anticipate it being the last shot and tend to relax too quickly. I.E. Bad follow through by me.

I have to ask...is that you in the picture or Gina Carano? Either way nice shinner. You into MMA? Nothing cooler than a girl who can kick your butt.

I completely agree with your assesment. It is really common with younger shooters and female shooters. They tend to be just a hair too timid with regards to their grip and stance. There are more than enough exceptions to that rule. You see it in men a lot less often, but you do see it.

Men tend to have the exact opposite problem. We tend to apply too much pressure, strangling the weapon to death and having way too stiff of a stance. Not all of us, but a lot of us. It really jacks up our marksmanship.

The solution to both, professional training.

jlh95811
09-26-2010, 10:55 AM
I have to ask...is that you in the picture or Gina Carano? Either way nice shinner. You into MMA? Nothing cooler than a girl who can kick your butt.

I completely agree with your assesment. It is really common with younger shooters and female shooters. They tend to be just a hair too timid with regards to their grip and stance. There are more than enough exceptions to that rule. You see it in men a lot less often, but you do see it.

Men tend to have the exact opposite problem. We tend to apply too much pressure, strangling the weapon to death and having way too stiff of a stance. Not all of us, but a lot of us. It really jacks up our marksmanship.

The solution to both, professional training.

It's Gina. I'm a fan of MMA but not an uberfan. I am a HUGE fan of Gina though. :)

winnre
09-26-2010, 11:20 AM
Don't suppose you have a steel/magnetic plate in your forehead?