PDA

View Full Version : A good 12 gauge recipe.


upinflames2400
12-02-2009, 9:21 AM
Currently I'm using win AA hulls, win 201 primers and 19.2 grains of red dot. I was wondering if anyone has any other trap loads that they enjoy and if you could give me your input. Thanks

kmca
12-02-2009, 10:52 AM
It depends on which wad you use. Is that 19.2 for a 1-1/8 oz load? Sounds kinda high.

upinflames2400
12-02-2009, 2:52 PM
yea its 1-1/8. i also just got a powder bushing for 18.5

kmca
12-02-2009, 3:09 PM
Shotgun loads are very dependent on what wad you're using. Unless you're using a Versalite or PC wad, 18.5 still seems high. Look at Alliant's website:
http://www.alliantpowder.com/reloaders/recipedetail.aspx?shotype=&weight=1.125&weightdis=1+1%2f8&shellid=493&gtypeid=3&gauge=12

upinflames2400
12-02-2009, 4:37 PM
Wow now that I checked alliant I can't believe I was using that much. Thanks for the help. And I'm using waa12 wads. I guess I'm gonna start using 17 grains no after reading that info

kmca
12-02-2009, 4:59 PM
You're welcome. It sounds like you're new to reloading shotgun. Something to be aware of, is that the powder bushing charts don't always agree with the actual charge weight. Be sure to weigh a few charges to make sure.

Revoman
12-02-2009, 5:59 PM
^^^ Excellent advise......rarely do the bushings corrulate to the grains. Even the chart that states it will throw xx amount of weight for xx powder, you must always check the weight with a calibrated scale.

You are living dangerously by not doing so.

There are many loads posted on the Alliant site, along with pamphlet/book information that has a lot of great information. Do not always trust forums for that kind of information as there are some who would steer you wrong. (My .02, but why do follks send viruses?)

And I assume that you meant 209 Win primers, not 201.

upinflames2400
12-02-2009, 8:04 PM
Yea I did mean 209 haha. I've only been reloading for a few months. Do you have any suggestions on a good powder scale that isn't rediculously exapensive?

Revoman
12-04-2009, 4:21 PM
For shotgun only, a beam scale is ample. If you are going to load rifle or pistol, I would get both a beam and an electronic.

The beam is accurate, but more time consuming to set up. The electronic is fast and easy to intermediately check loads.

RCBS has a decent beam, I'm sure that there are more, they are probably all manufactured by the same company anyway. (Ohaus I think)

For an electronic, they come in a wide band of cost.

I can tell you this, I have a Pact II that I have had for years and it is not what I would call a good electronic scale. I HATE it and have contacted the factory about it's shortcomings to no avail. I will tell anyone that wants to listen what a POS I think their scales are. Bought it because it was the only made in USA scale out there at the time. (OK, rant over.)

Sideline Shooter
12-04-2009, 10:44 PM
O.K. I have (a few) suggestions. 1. lose the 1 1/8 oz load. That load is way to old school and out of real use. Unless they are hot loads for the 27 yard line trap game it is way to much overkill. You really need to look at the 1 oz and 7/8oz load for trap and 5 stand. Red dot has a lot of loads for regular trap. As you hand load you are in the "know" with saving money and saving your shoulder. 7/8oz loads are the way to go with 16 yard trap loads. A lot, I repeat: alot less recoil and still bird dusting capabilities. You last longer on the field and your not beat up from too much recoil. A lot of old timers have created a muscle memory flinch from heavy load 1 1/8 oz loads, even when just walking around.
I didn't believe it myself until I tried it. WOW what a difference, especially in my scores and the next morning. Take a look at the load data and buy the appropriate wads. I will try to post some load data when I am at my home computer.

sideline shooter

upinflames2400
01-26-2010, 4:01 PM
Thanks for the info, i will definitely take less shot into consideration. :D

O.K. I have (a few) suggestions. 1. lose the 1 1/8 oz load. That load is way to old school and out of real use. Unless they are hot loads for the 27 yard line trap game it is way to much overkill. You really need to look at the 1 oz and 7/8oz load for trap and 5 stand. Red dot has a lot of loads for regular trap. As you hand load you are in the "know" with saving money and saving your shoulder. 7/8oz loads are the way to go with 16 yard trap loads. A lot, I repeat: alot less recoil and still bird dusting capabilities. You last longer on the field and your not beat up from too much recoil. A lot of old timers have created a muscle memory flinch from heavy load 1 1/8 oz loads, even when just walking around.
I didn't believe it myself until I tried it. WOW what a difference, especially in my scores and the next morning. Take a look at the load data and buy the appropriate wads. I will try to post some load data when I am at my home computer.

sideline shooter

NRAhighpowershooter
01-26-2010, 4:51 PM
the most I use is 1z of #7's I usually use 7/8 of #8 along with 17.0gr Clays with a WAA12SL for trap and skeet

jwest
01-26-2010, 5:08 PM
Not to go off on a tangent here - but is it true that loading for shotgun is generally 'tougher' than long gun? I have heard people say this - just wondering what you guys think. Heard it is definitely easier to load an incorrect charge...
Thanks,
jwest

mjsweims
01-26-2010, 5:26 PM
Not to go off on a tangent here - but is it true that loading for shotgun is generally 'tougher' than long gun? I have heard people say this - just wondering what you guys think. Heard it is definitely easier to load an incorrect charge...
Thanks,
jwest

I started with a MEC JR and still have a couple. Also use a 650 progressive. I never had any problems. I always matched components as per the load books when starting, but then made adjustments. I never went up to maximum powder charges except with Hevi-shot.

I rely on the bushings and don't weigh powder charge - it has worked for me for over 10 years. Keep the powder bottle about 1/3+ full and don't use a baffle. Even when the powder bushing is not exact it is very close. Also you have the exact same volume each time.

I started rifle/psitol reloading after several years of shotshell reloading and find it "tougher". Just a matter of what you get used to.

Revoman
01-26-2010, 5:30 PM
Tangent........
Not necessarily tougher to load, but there are a lot of different combinations with hulls, powder and wads.

Once you get it right, it's really quite easy.

Most folks depend on books, internet or the advise of a more experienced loader.

Keeping components simple is the best policy, don't take anything that someone has to offer and try to make it work. Sometimes it works, but most times it's a waste of resources.

RCBS actually puts out a very good shotshell reloading manual with lots of loads and physical loading information in it.

Sideline Shooter
01-26-2010, 5:42 PM
"I rely on the bushings and don't weigh powder charge - it has worked for me for over 10 years. Keep the powder bottle about 1/3+ full and don't use a baffle. Even when the powder bushing is not exact it is very close. Also you have the exact same volume each time."-mjsweims

That's not good advice, especially for a new reloader. There should never be any cutting corners or guessing on charge weight. It only takes once for a kaboom, whether it be 6 months or 10 years into it.

sideline shooter

mif_slim
01-26-2010, 5:55 PM
+1 on getting a scale. My .260 bushings was not showing the same gr as the book. I had to go down to .190 bushings to get a little over min. But that load worked for me so I'm happy with it.

Oh and rifle vs shotgun reloading: reloading shotgun wins hands down for less steps. Skip the tumbling, flash hole cleaning, trimming, chamfering, lubing, just check if the hull is still good and you are set to load.

chumrunner
08-18-2010, 1:51 PM
I have settled on a favorite target load and load an average of 500 rounds a week on a MEC 9000 Progresive. The recipe is published in the Alliant catalog. In my opinion checking powder weight with a scale is critical. The recipe calls for 19.7 grains of Red Dot which the Alliant guide converts to a #32 bushing @ 19.2 grains or #33 @ 19.9 grains. Actualy the #36 bushing drops 19.7 grains. I've discovered that the more volume of powder the bigger the discrepancy thus the need for a scale to confirm accuracy of the actual powder drop.

Remmington Game Load Hulls - 1oz shot - 19.7 gns Red Dot - CB1100-12 - Rem 209p when available - 1,310 FPS @ 9,400 PSI. This load is a little hotter than necessary for breaking clays but works well for me on Skeet, Trap & 5 Stand.