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Bucky G
12-01-2009, 8:47 PM
we were out shooting and I was reloading one of my rifles for a friend to shoot when all of a sudden I heard a bullet whiz by me
I look up and there's my lil boy twenty five yards away crouched on one knee aiming on a stick lying on the ground between me and him, I was almost directly in the line of fire
I was fit to be tied, I taught him over and over... finger off the trigger, safety on until you are ready to shoot, make sure of your backstop, never ever absolutely never ever point a gun in the direction of anybody... let alone fire in that direction
I took his gun away from him... he cried when he realized how irresponsible that was

tomd1584
12-01-2009, 8:48 PM
Scary.

Glad you're ok.

nplant
12-01-2009, 8:50 PM
You did the right thing, obviously. If he can't be trusted to do things right, then there's no sense letting him have the gun yet.

If you don't mind the question, how old is he?

five.five-six
12-01-2009, 8:51 PM
how old is he.... tell you, if my boy ever did that, he might not live to be 5

gun toting monkeyboy
12-01-2009, 8:51 PM
Can he sit down yet?

SIGman Freud
12-01-2009, 8:54 PM
Let's hope little man learned his lesson today. :eek:

Bucky G
12-01-2009, 8:55 PM
You did the right thing, obviously. If he can't be trusted to do things right, then there's no sense letting him have the gun yet.

If you don't mind the question, how old is he?

he's nine
he's really smart and very respectful to everybody
but I guess he's not ready yet... too much responsibility and doesn't understand the full consequences

SoCalRandy
12-01-2009, 8:58 PM
Wow, that's scary! Good thing nobody got hurt though. I know it's irrelevant but just curious what caliber was he shooting?

Noobert
12-01-2009, 8:58 PM
Wow, good thing it missed! Perhaps you ought to be paying attention to a nine year old with a gun instead of reloading for a friend?

five.five-six
12-01-2009, 8:58 PM
yea, that too^

jrau13
12-01-2009, 8:59 PM
Glad you are ok! I bet he wont do that again.

jdogg2000
12-01-2009, 9:00 PM
Wow, that's scary. The tough thing about kids sometimes is that despite all of the coaching you can give them, until a certain age they just don't understand the finality of death. Not saying this was a factor in this case, but I'm talking more about in general. I think from around age 6-9, kids are starting to learn that death is irreversible, but its only until beyond age 9 that most kids understand this. Glad you were okay!

John Z
12-01-2009, 9:01 PM
HOLY S***!!! Glad you're okay. It could have been very bad for you...obviously, but it would have been bad for your boy to live with a guilty conscience his whole life. Count your prayers Bucky.

Rob454
12-01-2009, 9:02 PM
I took his gun away from him... he cried when he realized how irresponsible that was

Tough s**t kid. You did the right thing. I would of wrapped the barrel around his neck for good measure
Im sure you know but make him understand what could happen when people play with guns without thinking

jarhead995
12-01-2009, 9:04 PM
Oh God that's bad.

So many things I could say right now, but ill refrain. Give him a year or more to think about what he did. Anyway 25 yards is pretty far, why did you leave him unaccompanied by an adult?

Bucky G
12-01-2009, 9:07 PM
Wow, that's scary! Good thing nobody got hurt though. I know it's irrelevant but just curious what caliber was he shooting?

22 here it is...

http://www.liveruckus.com/gallery/data/500/medium/ruger3.jpg

Wow, good thing it missed! Perhaps you ought to be paying attention to a nine year old with a gun instead of reloading for a friend?

yea, that too^

yup... my bad
We've been out shooting countless times, I'm always on him... watch where your pointing that thing... is that rifle on safe... is that a finger on that trigger?
guess I got lax after all the times he's been so safe
the other thing is, he's such a good shot, I think he had no idea he could do anything else but hit that stick

jamesob
12-01-2009, 9:14 PM
he is the same age as mine and i alway fear something like that. i remove my kids magazine and hold it until we are ready to shoot. he doesn't complain since he gets to carry it around with him.

jarhead995
12-01-2009, 9:17 PM
Dang wish I had a rifle as nice as that one.

Bucky G
12-01-2009, 9:25 PM
he is the same age as mine and i alway fear something like that. i remove my kids magazine and hold it until we are ready to shoot. he doesn't complain since he gets to carry it around with him.

I'm going to have to back to that
I don't want to put him off guns, but I did scare the crap out of him... and him me

ANARCANGEL
12-01-2009, 9:29 PM
YIKES!!! Kids sometimes don't think....no matter how much you try to teach'em. good thing no one was hurt.

fcr
12-01-2009, 9:30 PM
My dad took us out when we were younger and had a tarp that we shot off of. All barrels down range at all times. We weren't allowed away from the area with a gun. He would stand behind an basically teach.

bballwizard05
12-01-2009, 9:32 PM
yea very scary glad it worked out. I'll stick up for the OP here a little, I'm not a parent yet but I do work with kids for a living. I have watched 1 kid before and 30 kids before, it is impossible to be in any event and watch your child constantly. Even in situations with much larger consequences (e.g. guns) it just doesnt happen. I mean a parent or child supervisor could get something in their eye and be "out of commision" for 10 seconds, it happens. So always keep an eye out, but be realistic as well. And btw very nice little rifle!! Cooler than mine!

BT JUSTICE
12-01-2009, 9:36 PM
Get him a kitty and let him get really attached to it... then show him what could have happened to you. Okay, maybe a gopher in the yard would be better....

Bucky G
12-01-2009, 9:38 PM
yea very scary glad it worked out. I'll stick up for the OP here a little, I'm not a parent yet but I do work with kids for a living. I have watched 1 kid before and 30 kids before, it is impossible to be in any event and watch your child constantly. Even in situations with much larger consequences (e.g. guns) it just doesnt happen. I mean a parent or child supervisor could get something in their eye and be "out of commision" for 10 seconds, it happens. So always keep an eye out, but be realistic as well. And btw very nice little rifle!! Cooler than mine!

thanks
but not "cooler than yours" :p
your part of the reason I bought my 5.45

StraightArch
12-01-2009, 9:38 PM
Get him a kitty and let him get really attached to it... then show him what could have happened to you. Okay, maybe a gopher in the yard would be better....

I'm not sure that would go over to well with mom.

pratchett
12-01-2009, 9:42 PM
My dad used to always tell me that: "I'm going to kill your dog."

I'd say, "But daddy, I don't have a dog!"

So he's say, "Well, then I'm going to buy you a dog and then kill it."

bballwizard05
12-01-2009, 9:43 PM
my dad always said

"you cap my ***, I'll cap yours!!"

ok maybe not but it prolly would have worked!

five.five-six
12-01-2009, 9:45 PM
Get him a kitty and let him get really attached to it... then show him what could have happened to you. Okay, maybe a gopher in the yard would be better....

quite possibly the best use of a cat ever postulated

five.five-six
12-01-2009, 9:50 PM
yup... my bad

any time my boy screws up, no matter how much it %^%(^ me off, I always have to pause and remind myself, at this age, it is 100% my responsibility.....when he does something dumb, it's all me


that's why i won't let him prime brass, he won't keep his goggles on

Bucky G
12-01-2009, 9:54 PM
you guys are funny.... I don't like cats anymore than the next guy but jeez :D

Legasat
12-01-2009, 10:03 PM
Some of life's lessons are hard. My father taught me few that I will NEVER forget. I'll bet that was hard on him too.

You did the right thing, but you don't have to like it.

Henry Shooter
12-01-2009, 10:14 PM
Glad no one was hurt. Show him what he did wrong and the seriousness of the event. Let him know that he can't shoot with you or anyone else. Set the amount of time as you see fit. Don't dwell on the problem, treat each day as the next. When you feel he deserves to shoot again, let him know that there will be limits to begin with.
He understands the seriousness, let it soak in.

huckberry668
12-01-2009, 10:14 PM
I see a lot of adults get stupid around guns. Expecting a child with a gun to remember & obey all rules is virtually impossible. I have 3 sons and have gone shooting with friends and their children for the past 20 years. I never once had fun shooting with them because I was always on safety duty.

I gave them the rules, direction & targets to shoot at and always watch them from very close behind. And yet one of them still managed to shoot out a tire on my truck...

Being a certified pistol instructor, my rule #1 for shooting with kids - Repeat & 'show' them the rules but NEVER TRUST THEM! My eyes are on them as long as they're within an arm's reach of a gun. Why do you think they put an age requirement for buying guns?

SandDiegoDuner
12-01-2009, 10:20 PM
Some things don't get better with age. Just this last weekend at one of the outdoor shooting areas here in San Diego I had 3 IDIOTS shooting at a target probably 300 yards down range to our right. They were slightly elevated to our left. Basically shooting at a right angle over us to get to this target. The worst part was having to walk out and place targets while these jerks were shooting over us. Makes you almost want to return fire but the only thing I could think to do was shake my head in disgust and flip them the you're number one solute as we were driving out.

Bucky G
12-01-2009, 10:28 PM
shooting over your head?! jeezus

jyo
12-01-2009, 11:33 PM
Many years ago, myself and one of my better friends were out shooting along with his two younger sons at one of those shooting areas we used to have---we had several guns laying on the hood of his car (on a blanket), actions open, empty mags out pointing downrange---as time went on we continued to shoot and teach the sons how to shoot sometimes being on the wrong (muzzle) side of the car with the open unloaded guns just laying there. Well, the "clever" kids decided to "help" us by not only loading two Mini 14 magazines but also trying to insert them into the two Minis on the car hood---fortunately, I noticed what they were doing---it would have only needed them to actually load the rifles and touch the trigger to end in a horrible outcome. The lession here is not to take ANYTHING for granted regarding gun safety---just because you think your gun is unloaded doesn't make it true---pay attention!!

johnthomas
12-02-2009, 12:22 AM
It is good your not dead. That said, no matter how mature or sophisticated a child seems, he is not. His life experience is nominal at best. Their decision making skills aren't fully developed and their reactions aren't as quick as ours. Their also clumsy, little accidents equal big results. A kid 15-18 is having major hormonal changes making for some unstable periods in their lives. Don't put anything past these kids when it comes to guns, watch them like a hawk when your shooting with them and keep the guns locked up where they cannot get them no matter what. Remember, you are responsible for them and their actions. This is not just a little uh-oh, this is a major screw up on his part and yours. I won't make jokes or minimize the severity of this incident. You could have been killed, he would have to live with that for the rest of his life, your family would be without your income and you. You could have been hurt and not able to work, again your family would be without your income. I wonder what would have happened if it had been another shooter that didn't know you guys and got suprised by someone shooting at them. That is scary stuff.

MudCamper
12-02-2009, 8:56 AM
22 here it is...

http://www.liveruckus.com/gallery/data/500/medium/ruger3.jpg


The scope could have contributed. Literally gave him tunnel vision, and he didn't see you.

MasterYong
12-02-2009, 10:12 AM
Boy I hope you really laid into him...

Was out with a friend a couple weeks ago with my gf and my friend's 13 yr old son. The son had been taught all the shooting rules, but it was only his second time out with us. He had been shooting all different sort of rifles and handguns out here in AZ from ARs to .45 handguns to 30-30 lever actions. One of the rules was that he wasn't supposed to handle any of the guns until his dad told him he could pick it up, and then his dad would walk him through loading it and safely shooting it for each mag/cylinder. I'm holding one of my ARs getting ready to show a bottle of Gatorade just who makes the rules around here and I hear my buddy start screaming bloody murder. I thought he'd been shot. I unloaded my weapon and turned to see what had happened and his son had picked up a .22 blackhawk revolver and "checked to see if it was loaded" (that was his first excuse, and is a no-no to our shooting rules, which up to this point he'd been following). He tried to pull the hammer to half-cock and had his finger on the trigger. The round ricocheted off the desert gravel on the ground and hit his dad in the leg- it didn't break the skin but it left a helluva welt (was through denim). After questioning his excuse, since the gun couldn't have been loaded it was in his case and NONE of us would have left it loaded in the case, the son admitted that he had loaded it himself while he was standing BEHIND us, and was practicing unloading it.

He seemed like he was very aware of the responsibilities incurred with gun usage but then all of a sudden all the rules went out the window and he just didn't think. After his dad laid into him a bit about almost shooting his own father he made the kid reload the revolver at least 3 times with him watching and shoot it to prove he knew what he was doing. The kid kept saying that he didn't want to even touch the gun, he was really scared because of what he'd done, but the dad made him do it anyway. Seemed like it worked, the kid still likes to shoot but is WAY more respectful now. WAY.

rkt88edmo
12-02-2009, 10:39 AM
Wow, that's scary. The tough thing about kids sometimes is that despite all of the coaching you can give them, until a certain age they just don't understand the finality of death.

Some don't understand until 20,30,when they have kids, or never :p

DougJ
12-02-2009, 11:06 AM
I'm so glad you weren't injured, and I'm sure you'll make this mistake into a positive. He'll hopefully understand how important it is to never lose his focus like that.

As a very young boy my first exposure to firearms was going hunting with Dad. I didn't "rate" having a gun of my own yet, I was a hunters helper basically. I learned from that what a rifle can do, and how to safely handle one. After taking a safety course and getting my hunting license at a very young age, my Dad would take me bird hunting with him. I started out quail hunting with a 410 pump, but I was only allowed to load one shell at a time until I had proved myself safe.

I guess what I'm saying is that by being exposed first to the destructive capabilities of a firearm before just target shooting, I was very respectful of what I had in my hands when Dad gave me a gun.

When my Daughter was very young, maybe 5 or 6, as soon as I thought she might get curious, we did some shooting with BB guns and .22's. Very soon after that I took her out and we killed some squirrels so she could see what guns could do. Even at that age She understood that the gun was a tool, and although it could be fun to use, it was a dangerous tool.

She just turned 25, and during the infrequent times when we get go shoot she is a very safe shooting partner. Darn good shot too I might add...

IsaacGlass
12-02-2009, 11:38 AM
It was actually a good day for you, you're still alive :D

johnthomas
12-02-2009, 11:43 AM
Dougj, I think you hit on something there. In reality, shooting paper or bottles is just going thru the motions, a dry run. Not knowing the devastation a round can cause, lessens the learning experience. The finality of death that one of the poster's talked about is really taught on a hunting trip, or in battle. In lieu of a hunting trip, maybe a video could make the point, maybe not. We as adults don't normally live for the moment and understand our responsibilities and the negative impact a shooting has on a body, person, family and society. The financial and emotional devastation it causes. Shoulda, woulda, coulda and what if's are all out the window. Once the pin hits the primer, you can't put it back. My hope is that people reading these posts, take heed, take them to heart and bring what they read to the range or where ever they shoot.

M1A Rifleman
12-02-2009, 11:46 AM
Opps.

Reminds me of the first time my Dad took me out shooting when I was 8 old - which was 35 years ago.

I was shooting a single shot 22. He thought I was out of ammo since I was fumbling with the last round and he proceeding to walk toward the target at 90-degrees from me. I finally loaded and innocently took a shot when he was about 20 yrds from the target causing him to jump back. Reeling from this, he yells what are you doing. I respond I had one bullet left :D There was a stern lecture which followed.