PDA

View Full Version : computer q: Solidworks, CNC mills, Quadro cards, and GeForce cards


Nodda Duma
11-29-2009, 9:55 AM
Couple of questions related to the title, for you fellow computer, 3D-modeling, and CNC gurus.


Currently running a nice gaming computer system with a GeForce 9800 GT, but I also use SolidWorks on my computer. Problem is that while it works, the GeForce's don't support LiveView and/or more advance rendering functions like Quadros do.

Like any other Nvidia card since the 8800GTS, the 9800GT can't be soft-modded to a Quadro, so I picked up a used Quadro FX3500 for $30 (!) on ebay.

The Quadro is still in transit, so I'm in speculation mode until it arrives. My question is, is it possible to install both the Quadro and 9800 GT in the same computer, a Vista 64-bit box, and everything still be happy? Has anybody done this? For now I figure I will switch the monitor cable between cards, but ideally I'd like to get a second monitor and have one hooked up to each video card.

I'm using Solidworks for an Opto-mechanical engineering class. However, what's really cool is a fellow gun-owning buddy just obtained a CNC mill that he's currently setting up at home. We've talked about seeing if the step files that Solidworks outputs will work on his machine. You know, a personally machined and engraved AR-lower would be a really cool thing to have.

-Jason

MT1
11-29-2009, 10:21 AM
Never tried to do it personally, but I am familiar with your situation - do you have an SLI or Crossfire board? Or 2 PCI express bays?

Here is a similar situation:

http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/246662-33-running-quadro-geforce-card-machine-quadro-1500-gefo

Nodda Duma
11-29-2009, 11:07 AM
I saw that thread in my search and it didn't give me a warm and fuzzy.

-Jason

sierratangofoxtrotunion
11-29-2009, 12:03 PM
I'm using Solidworks for an Opto-mechanical engineering class. However, what's really cool is a fellow gun-owning buddy just obtained a CNC mill that he's currently setting up at home. We've talked about seeing if the step files that Solidworks outputs will work on his machine. You know, a personally machined and engraved AR-lower would be a really cool thing to have.

-Jason

It would be cool, but an AR lower wouldn't exactly be a beginning-level project. Also, it sounds like you have a pretty late version of SW, but the last time I messed with it, it didn't exactly output G-code. You'd still need a CAM program with the ability to translate into whatever it is that your mill will be able to understand.

There's AR lower CAD files out there on the internet somewhere, I forget where. I downloaded them once before, I may have them on a flash drive or on a computer at work or something. If I can find it, I'll share it with you. You can probably find it out there with some digging.

First result on google: http://www.biggerhammer.net/ar15/cad/
This is the one I was thinking of: http://www.cncguns.com/projects/ar15lower.html

Matt C
11-29-2009, 12:22 PM
I'm about 99% sure that when you try to put both on that MB it's going to refuse to boot. You are better off building another box (parts are cheap...). Also, make sure your power supply supports that video card, those Quadros are huge power hogs. The last time I had to install a bunch of them I had to modify the cases just to make them fit, and they would not boot with anything less than a 750watt PS.

Nodda Duma
11-30-2009, 12:26 AM
AR lower won't be the beginner project, it's more of a goal to work towards. He'll be doing simple shapes and other projects first. We're also not really beginners at machine work...just the CNC part.


This is the one I was thinking of: http://www.cncguns.com/projects/ar15lower.html


Your google-fu is strong. That is the model that I'll be playing with.


BWO: thanks for the heads-up.

-Jason

obeygiant
11-30-2009, 10:59 AM
This is the one I was thinking of: http://www.cncguns.com/projects/ar15lower.html

Beat me to it. That's a great site.

mgbebout
11-30-2009, 12:40 PM
I'm using Solidworks for an Opto-mechanical engineering class. However, what's really cool is a fellow gun-owning buddy just obtained a CNC mill that he's currently setting up at home. We've talked about seeing if the step files that Solidworks outputs will work on his machine. You know, a personally machined and engraved AR-lower would be a really cool thing to have.

-Jason

CAM software would be needed to develop the toolpath. The file format depends more on what the CAM software likes. Shouldn't me a big deal though. Getting the CAM software to output code that the CNC likes is the larger issue.