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THT
11-11-2009, 2:54 AM
Any recommendations for anti-malware/spyware programs?

lazyworm
11-11-2009, 5:14 AM
I know this is may not what you want to hear, but -- don't run windows is
probably the best answer. No need to play cat and mouse with all the constant
updates.

paul0660
11-11-2009, 5:44 AM
Spyware doctor with antivirus does fine, with occasional scans with Superspyware doctor. Malwarebytes has gotten a lot of attention recently but I did not find it an improvement over what I am using. I am not sure what lazyworm is talking about, since it has been years since I have had a problem with XP pro windows updates. I even have a Vista laptop that slogs along pretty well, and after some tweaking, doesn't ask me to confirm every command. Some of us do use real grown up financial programs that only work on the MS platform.

joefrank64k
11-11-2009, 9:14 AM
MS just released their FREE AV/ASW/AMW program that replaced Windows Live OneCare called Microsoft Security Essentials...

http://www.microsoft.com/security_essentials/?mkt=en-us

Works great, tight intergration with XP/Vista/7 and you can't beat the price! :D

Cokebottle
11-11-2009, 9:40 AM
Thanks for the tip on MSE.

I'll add it to my current triple-layer AVG/Spybot/Adaware

Seems that one will always pick up something that others missed.

mdouglas1980
11-11-2009, 9:46 AM
go to download.com and search for Ad-aware and Spybot. They have both free and pay versions of their software. I use the combination of both on my computer and never have a problem. Also there is a free version of AVG anti-virus software on there too. The AVG is also available in free or pay versions.

gunn
11-11-2009, 9:55 AM
Every so often, I run the following programs to clean out my system. Its kind of like a colonic for your PC.

Malware Bytes - I've had good success recently with getting rid of annoying spyware that the others wouldn't touch/remove completely
Spybot S&D - seems to take forever to run but I do NOT use their two resident programs (teatimer)....
Ad-Aware - don't find it as useful as the first two but worth running
CrapCleaner - not necessarily an anti-spyware program but cleans up old registry entries and whatnot.

Whenever a friend/relative wants me to clean out their PC, I usually download these programs and run them sequentially as a "tune-up." It's amazing how much crap can be found. After that stuff is run, I'll install AVG Free or Avast! Home as the program that stays resident and blocks any obvious trojans.

My personal anecdotal experience is that the classic "I'll corrupt files or trash your HDD" infection doesn't happen as much anymore -- the most annoying programs now are the ones that infest your machine so that someone can use it for their own purposes like DOS attacks (example: Vundo). For some of these, once I found an infection (and I refused to give up and just wipe the system), you may need to find a specialized anti-rootkit program. Malware Bytes worked the best for an especially invasive Vundo variant I managed to get a few months ago (if you didn't remove it completely, the stupid program would replicate itself all over again during the next reboot).

-g

AgentAK
11-11-2009, 10:02 AM
Not free, but probably the best out there...
http://www.eset.com/

BlackViper
11-11-2009, 10:02 AM
I've used damn near everything, but have settled on Avast! and never looked back. I have also heard the new MS stuff coupled with win7 is good though.

paul0660
11-11-2009, 10:03 AM
Malware Bytes worked the best for an especially invasive Vundo variant I managed to get a few months ago (if you didn't remove it completely, the stupid program would replicate itself all over again during the next reboot).

I got a Vundo from a game torrent downloaded by my grandson. Malwarebytes and spydoctor found it but could not get rid of it, even when in safe mode and rebooting. Superantispyware eliminated it. It is free. Grandson will be out of the doghouse after the first of the year.

lazyworm
11-11-2009, 10:03 AM
I am not sure what lazyworm is talking about, since [...]

What I meant is run an Operating system (OSX, linux, BSD etc) that is not
vulnerable to sypware/malware. Then you don't need to search for
protection software and keep it updated.

Finding the best app is great, but they can never offer 100% protection.
It's easier to take the plunge and run a non-MSFT OS than to wonder
if some malware/spyware got through because your neighbor's kid
touched your computer.

ocabj
11-11-2009, 10:38 AM
My policy for any Windows computer I control is to nuke the drive if it's infected, even with AV installed. Even you have AV and install other AV to scan the drive, there's the likely chance there's a rogue program installed that isn't a 'virus' that opens a backdoor into the computer that AV won't see/remove.

Nuke = reformat the drive and install. Reformat includes zeroing out all sectors including the boot sector / MBR.

In my organization, we try not to install Windows in a server capacity on bare metal, either.

bg
11-11-2009, 10:45 AM
If running Windows, I use Hijack This to help find suspicious bugs
as far as weird files, [Be careful as once you delete a file with
Hijack This..it's gone !]

Avira for the anti virus, Malwarebytes for malware bugs and
Super Anti Spyware to find even more bugs. All have served me
well for the past few years and the best part is, they're free.

http://www.trendsecure.com/portal/en-US/_download/HJTInstall.exe
http://www.free-av.de/en/trialpay_download/1/avira_antivir_personal__free_antivirus.html
http://www.malwarebytes.org/mbam-download.php
http://www.superantispyware.com/downloadfile.html?productid=SUPERANTISPYWAREFREE

there's the likely chance there's a rogue program installed that isn't a 'virus' that opens a backdoor into the computer that AV won't see/remove. SO very true !

Watch out for a weird download that you will really jack up for PC called
Computer Associates Anti Virus program. It literally takes over control
of your PC and can be real bear to get rid of.

whobob
11-11-2009, 10:45 AM
I don't care what anti virus you have, ALL anti virus are junk.

I ditched Windows and could not be any happier. Linux and Osx are similar, while Windows is left outside of the window. Chances of getting a virus/malware with Windows is like 90%. With Linux/Osx is < 1%.

If you really have to run Windows apps, you can run WINE or VirtualBox through Linux.

Cost break down for each OS.
Windows 7 $300
Snow Leopard $30
Linux $0

sevensix2x51
11-11-2009, 10:50 AM
i have had avast! and lavasoft adaware for about 5 years at least, and my pc's have run flawlessly since. i dont even have to run adaware anymore, just 2 times after a fresh install or an install for a friend/coworker, and it's clean. avast takes care of everything after that. my personal experience only, yours may vary...

avast home edition-free
adaware-free
pc that doesnt have "the AIDS"-priceless.

choprzrul
11-11-2009, 1:14 PM
For the home user, here is what I recommend to my customers:

1. Avast--free version for home use.
2. Spyware Terminator--free, don't install the Crawler toolbar or the Clam antivirus
3. Ccleaner run on weekly basis
4. Glary Utilities run on a weekly basis.
5. JkDefrag run on a weekly basis.
6. Malwarebytes ran on a monthly basis.

Keep in mind that the Malwarebytes free version does not have a real time scanner, so use it to find anything that might have slipped through. Also, a monthly BootTime Scan with Avast is a good idea.

Probably the best thing that you can do is install Untangle on an old computer. http://www.untangle.com/ stopping the crap at the edge of your network is much better than fighting it on each computer.

skip
11-11-2009, 2:41 PM
{alt + F11} restore to factory settings, or just stay of the porn sites... j/k

mousegun
11-14-2009, 10:15 PM
Best antivirus is Linux.
Solves constant pushing of "critical updates" problem, too
Also eliminates creeping application obsolescence.
The EULA doesn't exist.
And it works on 15 year old computers.

mather911
01-04-2010, 9:43 PM
AVGFREE, Ccleaner. Both can be found at filehippo.com along with many other free programs.

Josh3239
01-04-2010, 9:45 PM
I just got a bad trojan... twice. A combo of Super Anti Spyware and Malware Bytes really beat it up. I was also using adaware and playing with hijack this.

glock_this
01-04-2010, 9:52 PM
Kaspersky.. period

made by smart russians.. what more could you want?

nick
01-04-2010, 10:18 PM
Best antivirus is Linux.
Solves constant pushing of "critical updates" problem, too
Also eliminates creeping application obsolescence.
The EULA doesn't exist.
And it works on 15 year old computers.

That's because you don't APPLY the updates and patches released for the various Linux distros, since most of them don't include automated updates package. Just because you're unaware of the released patches doesn't mean they don't exist :) Oh, and rootkits actually come from the UNIX/Linux world. I have about 40 various Linux/UNIX systems (aside from the firewalls and other security appliances, phone systems running on Linux, etc.), and keeping them patched is quite a bit of a headache. Some make it relatively easy (Reghat, SuSE, Solaris), some are pain in the butt (specialized distros). Some release patches soon after a vulnerability is found, some take their sweet time or don't even bother releasing the patches (luckily, many patches apply across the board, or can be made to apply to other distros). There's one thing that they all have in common - the stream of patches is steady.

As for Windows, I'd recommend F-secure Client Security or their home equivalent (Internet Security, I believe) as the antivirus. Avast! is ok, too, unless you're running an enterprise environment (in which case it's a good idea to have something at the network edge, as well). For antispyware, the more the merrier (as long they aren't all resident in memory). Personally I use Malwarebytes, Superantispyware, Ad-aware Enterprise, and SpyBot. Malwarebytes is resident (you have to buy it for that module to be active though), the rest are there for the regular checkups. It's a good idea to include a non-US package in your mix, for the antimalware vendors with offices in the US are actually forbidden through case law to remove some spyware, which is legally considered "aggressive marketing methods" rather than what it is - malware. Malwarebytes has no US office, it's a British company run by a Polish guy out of his home :)

Ccleaner is also a good tool to use for general checkups, but be careful using it, so that it doesn't remove what you don't want removed. basically, know what you're removing.

Check what runs on startup (msconfig is a good start, check out the services that start automatically, as well).

And a defrag package is a good idea, as well (the built-in one sucks, but better than nothing). Diskeeper is the better one out there.

nick
01-04-2010, 10:19 PM
Kaspersky.. period

made by smart russians.. what more could you want?

Good choice. I use F-secure, is uses Kaspersky engine in conjunction with two other engines. Works pretty well, especially when compared to crap like Symantec or McAfee.

glock_this
01-04-2010, 10:23 PM
Symantec, Nortons, McAfee.. are not even players in my book. not if your serious about protection.

mousegun
01-05-2010, 3:58 PM
That's because you don't APPLY the updates and patches released for the various Linux distros, since most of them don't include automated updates package. Just because you're unaware of the released patches doesn't mean they don't exist :) Oh, and rootkits actually come from the UNIX/Linux world. I have about 40 various Linux/UNIX systems (aside from the firewalls and other security appliances, phone systems running on Linux, etc.), and keeping them patched is quite a bit of a headache. Some make it relatively easy (Reghat, SuSE, Solaris), some are pain in the butt (specialized distros). Some release patches soon after a vulnerability is found, some take their sweet time or don't even bother releasing the patches (luckily, many patches apply across the board, or can be made to apply to other distros). There's one thing that they all have in common - the stream of patches is steady.
Uh, didn't say I didn't apply them. Just said it wasn't much of a problem. Been running various Linuces since '94 and went mainstream when Win98 showed up with all its great promise. I've run distros both with and without auto update managers without suffering infections. I've run them literally for years online 24/7 without infections. I've used customized distros as proxy servers, router/switches and network file servers without infections. I don't own a Linux/BSD antivirus. You assume I don't apply available patches. Thanks. I now have distros that are as up to date as yesterday. I also have distros that have never been patched. What do you make of that?

I'm sorry you're having problems maintaining Linux systems virus free. Assuming your systems are enterprise, I would suspect the problems are more as much operator training and behavior as actual intrusion problems. But maybe not. Could be I just missed the point for 16 years.

But so far, for my little seven client Samba/NFS Windows/Linux hybrid network Linux is the best antivirus protection I've found.

I guess your mileage varied.

FreedomIsNotFree
01-06-2010, 12:21 PM
Firefox in conjunction with Avast will prevent the vast majority of issues.