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tzahoy
11-04-2009, 7:27 AM
The day I turned 40 I started to notice more difficulty seeing the sights, so I'm going to schedule my first visit in about 20 years. Can anyone recommend a good optometrist near San Jose? Bonus points if they're shooter friendly or experienced. I'd love to have someone who understands seeing the front sight at an arms length, and I'd rather send my insurance company's money to a shooter friendly doc.

Thanks for your help!

Dang, wrong forum, can someone move to handguns or general gun discussion?

HowardW56
11-04-2009, 7:44 AM
The day I turned 40 I started to notice more difficulty seeing the sights, so I'm going to schedule my first visit in about 20 years. Can anyone recommend a good optometrist near San Jose? Bonus points if they're shooter friendly or experienced. I'd love to have someone who understands seeing the front sight at an arms length, and I'd rather send my insurance company's money to a shooter friendly doc.

Thanks for your help!

Dang, wrong forum, can someone move to handguns or general gun discussion?

It has been my experience that most optometrist understand what you are trying to accomplish and will adjust the prescription to suit your needs. I have been warned more than once that it could cause a mild headache or eye discomfort if I use my shooting glasses all the time, it hasn't happened, I wear the same prescription all the time. The only doctor that had a problem with adjusting my prescription for shooting was an
Ophthalmologist, I never went back to him...

Glock22Fan
11-04-2009, 7:52 AM
For years I fought against progressive lenses, preferring bi- and then tri-focals. Then, with the optician promising me a thirty day free trial, I tried progressives (with polycarbonate lenses). After three days, I threw away my tri-focals (well, into a drawer) and can't imagine going back.

You are never going to get perfection, it isn't possible, but at least with progressives you can rock your head a little (it becomes automatic very quickly) and get perfect focus on whatever you are looking at.

I now have two pairs, one plain and one polaroid. As near perfection as I've had since my eyes started hardening up.

Wildkow
11-04-2009, 9:26 AM
Doc Handley EyeQ Eye Center 559 486-2000, Fresno, CA. Talk to Romilda (sp?) for the fitting she is a shooter also.

BTW Progressive lenses? :eek: :puke: Can't get used to them but love them for everyday use and have been wearing them for years. Hope I don't have to change this opinion after going back to bifocals.

BTW this is the pair of glasses I got with my Triflex lenses.

http://www.esseyepro.com/ICE-2X-NARO_147_detail.html

http://www.esseyepro.com/uploads/products/products_white_118_lg.jpg
For those with prescription eyewear, ESS has the solution. After the lenses have been corrected by an optometrist, the wire and monofilament-framed Vice™ Rx Lens Insert snaps into either the ICE™ eyeshield nosepiece or the Advancer V-12™ goggle for a low-profile, lightweight prescription integration. This allows one prescription carrier to work in two products.

The Vice™ Rx Lens Insert accommodates a range of corrections to +/- 6, and can be filled through ESS's skilled optometrists by clicking "Buy Now" and selected "Yes" for the ESS Rx Filling Service.

The Vice™ Rx Insert includes both an Advancer™ goggle adapter and an ICE™ eyeshield nosepiece:

Heres the best price I could find. . . http://www.opticsplanet.net/ess-ice-sunglasses.html

Good Luck

Wildkow

Flopper
11-04-2009, 9:27 AM
Even though a previous poster said most optometrists will know what to do, I would also prefer a specific referral over a swing in the dark.

So, anybody have a good eye doc in the South Bay Area?

schnellfeuer300
11-04-2009, 9:36 AM
Dr. Norman Wong in San Francisco is worth the drive. He's a Master-class bullseye pistol shooter and an excellent optometrist. He has a pair of contraptions with sights mounted on them, one with irons and one with an Aimpoint.

TimRB
11-04-2009, 9:39 AM
No specific recommendations on an optometrist, but really any one will do, since you are looking only for a specific prescription. Namely, clear vision a the distance from your eye to your front sight.

I measured that distance, took it to my optometrist for the test and prescription, and then bought a nice pair of Decot glasses. Done.

Tim

POLICESTATE
11-04-2009, 9:52 AM
DON'T go to Dr. Holbert. It doesn't have anything to do with shooting but I feel all they really do there is try and up-sell EVERY little thing they can on you, especially when it comes to contacts (they charge a fitting fee?)

That and I have not been happy with my glasses 2 years running now so I'm also looking for a new optometrist in the south bay area and would like some recommendations.

What are progressive lenses anyway?

kf6tac
11-04-2009, 9:58 AM
DON'T go to Dr. Holbert. It doesn't have anything to do with shooting but I feel all they really do there is try and up-sell EVERY little thing they can on you, especially when it comes to contacts (they charge a fitting fee?)

That and I have not been happy with my glasses 2 years running now so I'm also looking for a new optometrist in the south bay area and would like some recommendations.

What are progressive lenses anyway?

AFAIK, a fitting fee for contacts is pretty standard - so much so that my insurance specifically provides coverage for them (to a certain extent).

POLICESTATE
11-04-2009, 10:00 AM
AFAIK, a fitting fee for contacts is pretty standard - so much so that my insurance specifically provides coverage for them (to a certain extent).

Very crooked practice IMO, all it is is you sticking them in your eyes and them looking at them and then asking 2 or 3 questions. Should be part of the regular exam.

kf6tac
11-04-2009, 10:12 AM
Very crooked practice IMO, all it is is you sticking them in your eyes and them looking at them and then asking 2 or 3 questions. Should be part of the regular exam.

Do they charge you for it every time? I can understand them charging the first time around, since they take extra time to make sure you know how to put the things in (which, if you're unskilled like me, can take awhile). If they charge you for it every time you come back for a new prescription, then yeah, that's kind of lame.

POLICESTATE
11-04-2009, 10:22 AM
Do they charge you for it every time? I can understand them charging the first time around, since they take extra time to make sure you know how to put the things in (which, if you're unskilled like me, can take awhile). If they charge you for it every time you come back for a new prescription, then yeah, that's kind of lame.

Yeah they do, I've been using Dr Holbert in Sunnyvale for about 9 years now and that's the other thing that kind of bugs me about them, they always treat me like a new patient.

Glock22Fan
11-04-2009, 10:55 AM
Once you get to a certain age, contact lenses are of little use unless you can wear the hard type (I can't).

Unless things have changed, soft lenses are single prescription and therefore of little use to people whose eyes are aging and who therefore need different prescriptions at different distances. For a short while, I struggled with soft lenses and "half" glasses, but it is too much hassle. AFAIK, hard lenses are available as bi-focals, but that becomes limiting when you reach the need to middle vision correction as well.

Bi-focals (and tri-focals) allow for two (or three) different prescriptions at different distances. With a tri-, you could have the bottom section set up for close up (reading), the middle for computer work (or handgun sights) and the top for long distance.

A progressive lens is much like a trifocal except that there is no hard line, and an infinite number of prescriptions. The lower down through the lens you look, the closer in your eyes will focus. So, the very top is used for distance, the very bottom for closeup and the middle for middle distances, but this finely changes as you "rock" your head - it all merges together. For a short while (maybe a few hours or a few days) you have to get used to rocking your head until the object comes into focus, but after that it becomes automatic and you don't even think of it.

There is still some room for experimenting, I prefer my middle vision a little higher than most opticians are used to setting it, but I know what to ask for and that works for me.

POLICESTATE
11-04-2009, 11:17 AM
I had forgotten about hard lenses, I think I might need to look into those as a possibility as I don't care for soft lenses with all the computer work I do. How do you know what to ask for in terms of setting your vision?

Once you get to a certain age, contact lenses are of little use unless you can wear the hard type (I can't).

Unless things have changed, soft lenses are single prescription and therefore of little use to people whose eyes are aging and who therefore need different prescriptions at different distances. For a short while, I struggled with soft lenses and "half" glasses, but it is too much hassle. AFAIK, hard lenses are available as bi-focals, but that becomes limiting when you reach the need to middle vision correction as well.

Bi-focals (and tri-focals) allow for two (or three) different prescriptions at different distances. With a tri-, you could have the bottom section set up for close up (reading), the middle for computer work (or handgun sights) and the top for long distance.

A progressive lens is much like a trifocal except that there is no hard line, and an infinite number of prescriptions. The lower down through the lens you look, the closer in your eyes will focus. So, the very top is used for distance, the very bottom for closeup and the middle for middle distances, but this finely changes as you "rock" your head - it all merges together. For a short while (maybe a few hours or a few days) you have to get used to rocking your head until the object comes into focus, but after that it becomes automatic and you don't even think of it.

There is still some room for experimenting, I prefer my middle vision a little higher than most opticians are used to setting it, but I know what to ask for and that works for me.

DarkGT
11-04-2009, 11:44 AM
Oakley also makes perscription glasses in several styles. I know that they meet the ANSI and MIL requirements and I know at the range I go to they are acceptable eyewear. I have been through their design quality assurance labs and they are truly top notch. One thing you ahve to get for Oakley glasses is the PD measurement, easy to do but not all docs do it since most glasses don't have the curve that Oakley lenses do.

pullnshoot25
11-04-2009, 12:04 PM
Costco. They are rad.

Might want to put a hyphen between "shooting" and "experienced" in the title. Sounds a little off without that...

Glock22Fan
11-04-2009, 12:30 PM
I had forgotten about hard lenses, I think I might need to look into those as a possibility as I don't care for soft lenses with all the computer work I do. How do you know what to ask for in terms of setting your vision?

When they (usually one of the technicians) put the frames on your face and start marking the lenses, I tell them where I want my distance vision and my middle vision. They tend to put the distance vision about midway down the lens, I prefer it in the top quarter or third. A bit hard to describe, but easier to demonstrate. I often find myself looking through the window at some distant object, grabbing the marker pen, and putting the dot on the lens myself. I used also to find (with tri-focals) that it was hard to read without straining my eyes down to look through the bottom of the lens at a book held close to me and high on my chest. Now I make sure the opticial knows where I prefer to hold by book.

I'd rather tip my head down a little to see into the distance than stick my chin in the air to read my computer screen. A more outdoors person might prefer it more the other way.

Cnynrat
11-04-2009, 2:08 PM
Once you get to a certain age, contact lenses are of little use unless you can wear the hard type (I can't).

Unless things have changed, soft lenses are single prescription and therefore of little use to people whose eyes are aging and who therefore need different prescriptions at different distances. For a short while, I struggled with soft lenses and "half" glasses, but it is too much hassle. AFAIK, hard lenses are available as bi-focals, but that becomes limiting when you reach the need to middle vision correction as well.

Bi-focals (and tri-focals) allow for two (or three) different prescriptions at different distances. With a tri-, you could have the bottom section set up for close up (reading), the middle for computer work (or handgun sights) and the top for long distance.

A progressive lens is much like a trifocal except that there is no hard line, and an infinite number of prescriptions. The lower down through the lens you look, the closer in your eyes will focus. So, the very top is used for distance, the very bottom for closeup and the middle for middle distances, but this finely changes as you "rock" your head - it all merges together. For a short while (maybe a few hours or a few days) you have to get used to rocking your head until the object comes into focus, but after that it becomes automatic and you don't even think of it.

There is still some room for experimenting, I prefer my middle vision a little higher than most opticians are used to setting it, but I know what to ask for and that works for me.

They do make soft contact bifocals now. They are often called multifocals (http://www.allaboutvision.com/contacts/bifocals.htm), and I think they function more like progressives than true bifocals. They have concentric rings on the lens with different correction factors. I wear contacts sometimes, and have them set up for monovision. Per typical practice my dominant eye is corrected for distance. I found this wasn't working too well for shooting, so I took that problem to my eye doctor (who is not a shooter, BTW). He understood the issue, and the solution we ended up with is to use a multifocal soft contact for my dominant eye. It gives me just a little more correction in the mid-distance. I tried multifocals in both eyes, but couldn't read with them.

I agree with you about shooting with progressive lenses. I rock my head back a little and the front sight just pops into focus. Really nice!

For the OP, my experience is that if you have a good eye doctor he should be able to work with you to find a solution. If you can find an eye doctor who happens to be a shooter, so much the better, but that may not be necessary.

Fire in the Hole
11-04-2009, 5:26 PM
If you are willing to travel to Sonora, My optometrist worked at Sierra Bullets as a teenager. He is a NRA Rifle Coach, Palma Shooter, and 3 gun competitor, and avid hunter. Also if you have a neat quality toy, that he wants to add to his expansive inventory; prices are negotiable.

He does all the glasses for the local competitive shooters.
Sonora Vision Center
Peter A. Shumway, OD
(209) 533-2550


BTW. Why is this thread in the 2am, Politics, and Law sub-forum?

tzahoy
11-05-2009, 6:46 AM
BTW. Why is this thread in the 2am, Politics, and Law sub-forum?

Well, 'cuz that's what I was reading last when I decided to post... I goofed. I did edit the message to try and move it, but couldn't figure out how.

Somehow I did seem to get a lot of great responses though! Thanks for everyone's input, I think I'm going to make the drive to see doc Wong in SF.

POLICESTATE
11-05-2009, 10:05 AM
I just made an appointment at Sunnyvale Optometry for next week, I will post back on the experience. I seriously doubt any of them shoot but the main issue I'm going for is that my soft contact lenses never give me very clear vision as well as the whole drying out thing when working around computers.

So this time I'm going to gas permeable lenses since they are supposed to have sharper vision though there is an adjustment period I will JUST have to tough out :rolleyes:

Also for the rest of you check out some optometrists on www.yelp.com, I normally don't care much for sites like that but sometimes they are useful.

hawaii05
11-14-2009, 9:07 AM
I go to North Valley Optometry off Berryessa and Capitol. http://www.northvalleyoptometry.com . Dr. Ngo doesn't look like she shoots, but she's been my optometrist for the past 10 years and she's great. Small practice, takes her time, not pushy, real customer service oriented and she's extremely good at what she does.

-hanko
11-14-2009, 2:00 PM
The day I turned 40 I started to notice more difficulty seeing the sights, so I'm going to schedule my first visit in about 20 years. Can anyone recommend a good optometrist near San Jose? Bonus points if they're shooter friendly or experienced. I'd love to have someone who understands seeing the front sight at an arms length, and I'd rather send my insurance company's money to a shooter friendly doc.

Thanks for your help!

Dang, wrong forum, can someone move to handguns or general gun discussion?
tzahoy, I noticed the same thing when i hit four-zero...had an exam by an opthamologist who suggested i bring a pistol, rifle, and shotgun to the next exam (this is in Idaho, it may be next-to-impossible in the People's Republic;))
Dr. turns out to be a silhouette shooter and a very good one at that.

Dr. discovered a had a cataract (sp??) in my right eye, result of trauma when I dumped a dirtbike in my younger days. Removal of the cataract and a replacement lens implant took the eye from 20-800 to 20-15 literally overnight.

Anyway, following is an old post to the bullseye shooters' mailing list from Norm Wong in Feb., 2005...it's lengthy but might be worth printing and taking to your DO or MD...ooops, just found it's a bit long to post, I'll chop it a little and post the rest in the next post.

-hanko

"Date: Sat, 5 Feb 2005 21:29:36 -0800 (PST)
From: Norman Wong
Subject: Bullseye Shooters' Guide for the Eyecare

BULLSEYE SHOOTERS' GUIDE FOR THE EYECARE PROFESSIONAL



Dear Colleague,

My name is Norman H. Wong, O.D. and I am a member of the California Optometric Association and the American Optometric Association. I am also a veteran, a life-member of the NRA and a competitive bullseye shooter. Bullseye shooters are a wonderful group of individuals with critical visual needs. Please put aside any political views against firearms, if any, and treat the bullseye shooter as you would any other patient. The patient had asked for permission to bring his/her firearm(s) to the office for the eye examination and will demonstrate that the firearm is unloaded and safe. If the patient was denied, sighting parts of the pistol(s) were brought instead. Take a moment to review these important steps before and during your eye examination. Besides your routine health tests of the eyes, I have emphasized a few areas of concern. Your kind attention to details would be most appreciated.


EYE EXAMINATION

1. CASE HISTORY: A thorough case history revealing any medical problems which may relate to eye health and vision stability is essential. Note all medications taken, including over-the-counter medications and advise of possible visual side affects.

2. DOMINANCE: Review and confirm eye dominance and hand dominance.

3. REFRACTION: Your best effort is needed to obtain the most accurate results. After you obtain your best distance Rx, see if the patient is sensitive to 0.12 diopter steps. Please double check vertex distances especially for higher powers. Check to see if the patient's line of sight is "continually" centered through the phoropter lenses. Do not reduce the full strength of the prescription even if there was a large change from the previous examination results. Small prescriptions such as +0.25, -0.25 diopter sphere and +0.25, -0.25 diopter cylinder, even if obliquely orientated, may be significant.

4. RED DOT SCOPES: Normally, the best lens for the red dot scope viewing would be the best distance prescription. Demonstrate this lens while the patient looks at the red dot while holding out the scope. Because the red dot in the scope is not focused at "optical infinity" (it is closer), try a +0.12 or a +0.25 diopter lens over the best distance prescription to see if the dot becomes even clearer. If possible, judgment would be best if the patient can view at a distance greater than the standard 20 feet and with outdoor lighting. If the dot is distorted, use the phoropter once again to verify cylindrical power and axis as the patient holds the pistol (or scope only) in front of the phoropter. Final results may be demonstrated with trial lenses. If after all lens possibilities have been demonstrated and the red dot never became clear and round, then a careful determination of ocular health involvement needs to be assessed.

5. IRON SIGHTS: We are concern with three separate entities, the clarity of the front sight, the clarity of the rear sight and the relative blurriness of the bullseye. These three positions cannot be focused simultaneously with just a lens. The rear sight is separated from the front sight by about 6 3/4 inches in most standard 1911 45 caliber pistols. Measure the EXACT distance from the patient's shooting eye to the rear of the front sight while he/she is in the proper stance. Write this down for the patient's record. Set this distance for the reading card on the rod of the phoropter. Find the best lens for this position and then try 0.12 diopter higher and 0.12 diopter lower and note if the patient responds to this small change. Presbyopic patients will give good responses. For the pre-presbyopes, low power lenses may allow for a more stable focus. Younger patients under 35 years of age may benefit from a minimal plus power for a steadier focus, or perhaps none at all.

The patient needs to know the best plus lens because there are specialty type shooting glasses with interchangeable lenses. The two popular ones are Knobloch Optik and Neostyle Champion systems which include lenses, occluders, apertures and side blinders. There are a number of lenses available with these systems (+0.50, +0.75, +1.00, +1.25, +1.50). The base lens (patient's distance prescription) can be custom made at the optical lab to incorporate into this system. This interchangeability allows for a quick change when different powers are needed for various shooting distances and lighting conditions. Personally, my best lens for the front iron sight stays the same under day and night lighting situations. In my case and in many other patients', we prefer a dedicated pair of shooting glasses for the iron sights, which may also be helpful as a computer Rx and for other hobbies at a similar working distance.

Next, have the patient view this best lens with the pistol in hand at a distance greater than 20 feet, and if possible, outdoors at 25 and 50 yards. Majority of offices may have limitations. Depending upon a few factors such as arm length and pupil size, typical lenses that work best are +0.50, +0.75 and +1.00 diopter over the best distance prescription but also try +0.37, +0.62 and +0.87 diopter lenses even though these are uncommon powers. You may be surprised how sensitive some shooter's eyes may be. In my case, +0.75 diopter is my ideal lens. A +0.62 diopter lens blurs the rear sight and a +0.87 diopter lens blurs the bullseye too much. Experienced shooters would know that the distance bullseye will be out of focus. As different lenses are tried, this will allow the patient to compare the relative blurriness to the bull. Stress that front iron sight clarity is more important than the bull clarity. Most shooters know that an adjustable aperture will then help clear the bul
l. When
too much emphasis is given to the bull clarity, then the rear sight clarity will be compromised. The patient will always shoot better if the front and rear sights are perfectly clear and aligned while the bull is blurred rather than if the bull is clear and the sights cannot be seen well enough for proper alignment. Always use the lowest plus power lens to achieve this goal.

As a quick reference guide, here are the focal lengths of the powers discussed:
+0.37 diopter: 2.66 meters
+0.50 diopter: 2 meters
+0.62 diopter: 1.6 meter
+0.75 diopter: 1.33 meter
+0.87 diopter: 1.14 meter
+1.00 diopter: 1 meter
Lens determination by focal lengths alone may cause erroneous results. This should be used only as a starting point.

-hanko
11-14-2009, 2:02 PM
Part 2...

"6. BINOCULARITY: Advise the patient if there are any binocular problems which may affect focusing stability. Most shooters occlude one eye but some shoot with both eyes open and suppresses the non-dominant eye. Hyperopic patients who are esophoric may have more of a difficult time if eyeglasses are not worn. Again, low power lenses need to be prescribed if the patient desires clear and stable focus.

7. CORNEA: Carefully inspect for any corneal defects including beginning signs of keratoconus. Note and advise the patient of any old scars and dystrophies along the visual axis which may compromise the focus of the red dot. Check corneal curvatures with the keratometer or use corneal topography for irregularities. Check the tear film and advise of any possibility of dry eyes which may cause unstable focus. Recommend dry eye therapy as needed. Use of ocular lubricants may be beneficial before and during shooting.

8. LASIK and RADIAL KERATOTOMY: Foreign matter introduced in the interface and other complications during LASIK procedure may or may not affect vision. Advise accordingly. Irregular astigmatism may result from radial keratotomy and distort the red dot. Frequently, we will have an undercorrection or an overcorrection after surgery and the full lens prescription needs to be given.

9. CONTACT LENSES: Patients correctable to 20/20 or better frequently see only 20/25, 20/30 or worse with contact lenses. This may be due to small uncorrected astigmatism, contact lens surface deposits, or desiccation of the soft lens material. Contact lens lubricants may help when used before and during a match. A shift in vision may be noted when toric contact lenses rotate. These minor problems may be acceptable to the patient.

10. PUPILS: Note if the patient's pupil is unusually small or large. A small pupil will allow for a longer depth of focus but may cause more symptoms with lenticular opacities. A wide pupil will cause a short depth of focus and will make our job a little more challenging to find the best lens possible. As the amount of ambient light changes throughout the day, the pupil size will also change and may give different sighting appearances. Inspect the iris for colobomas and for trans-illumination defects which may cause diplopia and glare.

11. CRYSTALLINE LENS: Note and advise the patient of any lenticular opacities which may affect the viewing of the sights. Commonly seen opacities may not affect the non-shooters but will affect the shooters' clarity of the red dot or iron sights. Senior patients who have had intra-ocular implants need to be closely inspected for signs of posterior capsular opacities.

12. MACULA: Closely inspect the macular area for any signs of defects including ARMD. Use of Amsler Grid may be helpful.


EYEGLASS SELECTION

1. LENSES: Review past lens types and materials used. Discuss what has worked and what has not. Review ABBE VALUE of various lens materials and possible distortions especially in higher powers. Polycarbonate is the only FDA approved safety material that is widely used today and is always recommended as the first choice. Other materials may be used ONLY with the patient's understanding that they are not approved safety materials. If needed, the patient may be required to sign a waiver of responsibility. Many patients choose to have a dedicated pair of shooting glasses which should be polycarbonate and then other materials may be used for their dress eyeglasses. Note that Knobloch Optik and Neostyle Champion lenses come only in CR-39 plastic. When writing up the lab order, request for "exact power required" and reject lenses that are not exact even though they fall at the limits of the ANSI standards of power, +0.12 and -0.12 diopter.

2. EYEGLASS FRAMES: Frames should not be too small and flimsy such as rimless. Safety frames following ANSI standards would be best. Wrap-around style frames may require steeper base curve lenses which may cause distortions. Some sports frames which have a one piece curved front shield may have inserts which will allow for the patient's prescription lenses. These goggle type frames have no adjustability, important with moderate to high prescriptions. Being that there are four surfaces, fogging and cleaning may be a problem.

3. MULTI FOCAL HEIGHT MEASUREMENTS: Have the patient demonstrate their head posture while at their "shooting stance" as you take the proper height measurements. Extreme diligence needs to taken so that the line of sight is not impeded by the near or intermediate portion of the lens. When measured correctly, there should be no restrictions with bifocal, trifocal and progressive lenses. Verify that the measurement taken with the shooting stance is also compatible with the patient's normal daily use.

4. ANTI-REFLECTION COATINGS and ULTRAVIOLET COATINGS: Discuss the advantages of AR coatings which will reduce glare as well as reflections and UV coatings for blocking harmful UV rays of the sun.

5. TINTS: Kalichrome (yellow) enhances contrast but offers very little shading and may be helpful in low light settings. PLS 530 (orange) and PLS 540 (orange-brown) are tints which block all wavelengths above their stated levels. I have found that it is best for the patients to view tint samples and have them report what is most comfortable. Transitions photochromic lenses lighten and darken with the amount of direct sunlight and its usage is very convenient. Avoid "fashion tints" which have no protective qualities. If possible, loaning samples for the patient to view at the range would be most helpful.

I am constantly learning more of the bullseye shooter's needs as I continue to participate in this rewarding sport and have been revising and adding onto this list. I will, from time to time, update this list as needed. Bullseye shooters are intelligent, honest, law-abiding citizens with much character. You now also have a very happy patient and we invite you, your family and friends to join us and see what BULLSEYE SHOOTING is all about.

Regards,

Norman H. Wong, O.D."

Again, hope this helps you out...

-hanko

gbp
11-14-2009, 3:14 PM
http://www.hansenseagleeye.com/

user_name
11-14-2009, 10:54 PM
The day I turned 40 I started to notice more difficulty seeing the sights, so I'm going to schedule my first visit in about 20 years. Can anyone recommend a good optometrist near San Jose? Bonus points if they're shooter friendly or experienced. I'd love to have someone who understands seeing the front sight at an arms length, and I'd rather send my insurance company's money to a shooter friendly doc.

Thanks for your help!

Dang, wrong forum, can someone move to handguns or general gun discussion?

Dan Baggett in Palo Alto is excellent.. http://californiaavenueoptometry.com/ourpractice.htm

tzahoy
11-16-2009, 9:15 PM
Wow Hanko, you rock! Thanks for the great article. I'll definitely be booking an appointment with Dr. Wong.

coyotekiller56
12-21-2009, 7:26 AM
I would like more info on contacting Dr. Wong.
Phone number or name of business?
Thanks

code33
12-21-2009, 8:16 AM
http://www.yelp.com/biz/dr-norman-h-wong-san-francisco

5196 Mission Street
San Francisco, CA 94112
(415) 587-3937

I would like more info on contacting Dr. Wong.
Phone number or name of business?
Thanks