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View Full Version : How to keep the action open on a saiga/ak?


Henry Hill
11-02-2009, 8:06 PM
How do I make the action on a Saiga stay open ?

John Z
11-02-2009, 8:08 PM
It's in your manual. There's a little lever right under the receiver by the trigger. Pull the bolt back, squeeze the button, release bolt slowly.

tonelar
11-02-2009, 8:12 PM
Just so ya know;
it's not available on all Saigas... neither of my 7.62 x 39 had them one yet my .308 does.

Cokebottle
11-02-2009, 8:17 PM
Dinzag can modify your selector lever:

http://www.dinzagarms.com/saiga_762x39/sslbho.html

http://www.dinzagarms.com/saiga_762x39/large/sslbho.jpg

Henry Hill
11-02-2009, 8:18 PM
It's in your manual. There's a little lever right under the receiver by the trigger. Pull the bolt back, squeeze the button, release bolt slowly.

Thanks!!

tuna quesadilla
11-02-2009, 8:20 PM
It's in your manual. There's a little lever right under the receiver by the trigger. Pull the bolt back, squeeze the button, release bolt slowly.

Sounds just like a Ruger 10/22!

duraglock
11-03-2009, 6:40 AM
Or roll your own. Takes all of a few minutes.
http://www.solartactical.com/product.sc?productId=25&categoryId=14
Next mark your selector and cut the notch. Just did one on my saiga 12

SJgunguy24
11-03-2009, 6:44 AM
Or roll your own. Takes all of a few minutes.
http://www.solartactical.com/product.sc?productId=25&categoryId=14
Next mark your selector and cut the notch. Just did one on my saiga 12

You are quite the salesman dude.....your killen me:p


I've done that on all of my AK's.

Henry Hill
11-03-2009, 11:52 AM
Or roll your own. Takes all of a few minutes.
http://www.solartactical.com/product.sc?productId=25&categoryId=14
Next mark your selector and cut the notch. Just did one on my saiga 12

Awesome, thanks for the link.. I did find it very strange that something similar didnt come installed on the Saiga... And the way the safety/dust cover works is just very odd to me :eek: First rifle and unfamiliar with AK platform so I'm still gettin the hang of it... Thank for the input fellas. I still have no idea why the rear sight flips up :confused:

djleisure
11-03-2009, 12:14 PM
All of these weird little things with an AK are because they wanted the simplest possible weapon. Start adding bolt hold-opens, safety's that allow the weapon to be charged and front sights that do more than elevation and all you're doing is adding stuff that can break and go wrong. :D

I love my Saiga's and AK-variants, but the AR platform is just far more elegant.

Cokebottle
11-03-2009, 12:32 PM
I still have no idea why the rear sight flips up :confused:
It is for accounting for bullet drop at long range.

Mythbusters did a test a couple of weeks ago with a .45acp to test the myth that the flying bullet would or would not drop faster than a static bullet dropped.

Both bullets drop at the same rate, which for the speed of the .45 round they were using, was about 350-360ft for a bullet fired horizontally from 3ft above the ground. From 3ft, the calculated impact (3ft bullet drop) would be in about .44 seconds.

Here's the physics behind it: http://blog.dotphys.net/2009/10/mythbusters-bringing-on-the-physics-bullet-drop/

Okay, so we know that if your sights are "zeroed" for 2ft in front of the gun, then in .44 seconds, the bullet will impact about 3ft below the aim point.

This is basic sniper school 101.

Knowing the velocity of your bullet, and knowing the range to your target, you can then calculate how far the bullet will drop before impact, so you can then intentionally "aim high" to get the desired impact "x" seconds later.
Rather than forcing the soldiers to do the math in the battlefield, gun and optics manufacturers do the calculations and build that into the design of the weapon's systems... in the case of the AK, it's a simple flip up rear sight with an adjustable barrel. Like everything AK... the KISS principle applies. It may not be the most precise piece of equipment, but it always works ;)

The 1-10 numbers on the site represent ranges from 100 to 1000 meters.

Here's a quick guide on setting your sights:
http://www.ak-47.net/ak47/sightingin.html

Basically, you want to adjust the sights so that with the barrel set at "1" you are hitting bullseyes at 25 yards, and that'll get you within 16" at 1000 yards.

You don't fire with the sight flipped directly up... the site is always laid back and you are looking through the groove in the midde. As you move the barrel forward, it will raise the rear edge of the sight the appropriate amount.

The flip-up allows you to see the adjustment that you are making without looking directly down on the sight, which in the battlefield would mean either hovering over the gun, or pointing the gun at the sky. Both can reveal your position, and either require that you take your eyes off of the target or move the gun out of firing position.

Cokebottle
11-03-2009, 2:00 PM
Okay, so we know that if your sights are "zeroed" for 2ft in front of the gun, then in .44 seconds, the bullet will impact about 3ft below the aim point.
BTW: This is also why laser boresighters are fine for sighting in a home-defense weapon (drop during the first 50-100ft is negligible), but are only a tool for ballparking the sights on a long gun.
The laser is going to "dot" the target as if there were no bullet drop.

xxdabroxx
11-03-2009, 2:44 PM
It is for accounting for bullet drop at long range.

Mythbusters did a test a couple of weeks ago with a .45acp to test the myth that the flying bullet would or would not drop faster than a static bullet dropped.

Both bullets drop at the same rate, which for the speed of the .45 round they were using, was about 350-360ft for a bullet fired horizontally from 3ft above the ground. From 3ft, the calculated impact (3ft bullet drop) would be in about .44 seconds.

Here's the physics behind it: http://blog.dotphys.net/2009/10/mythbusters-bringing-on-the-physics-bullet-drop/

Okay, so we know that if your sights are "zeroed" for 2ft in front of the gun, then in .44 seconds, the bullet will impact about 3ft below the aim point.

This is basic sniper school 101.

Knowing the velocity of your bullet, and knowing the range to your target, you can then calculate how far the bullet will drop before impact, so you can then intentionally "aim high" to get the desired impact "x" seconds later.
Rather than forcing the soldiers to do the math in the battlefield, gun and optics manufacturers do the calculations and build that into the design of the weapon's systems... in the case of the AK, it's a simple flip up rear sight with an adjustable barrel. Like everything AK... the KISS principle applies. It may not be the most precise piece of equipment, but it always works ;)

The 1-10 numbers on the site represent ranges from 100 to 1000 meters.

Here's a quick guide on setting your sights:
http://www.ak-47.net/ak47/sightingin.html

Basically, you want to adjust the sights so that with the barrel set at "1" you are hitting bullseyes at 25 yards, and that'll get you within 16" at 1000 yards.

You don't fire with the sight flipped directly up... the site is always laid back and you are looking through the groove in the midde. As you move the barrel forward, it will raise the rear edge of the sight the appropriate amount.

The flip-up allows you to see the adjustment that you are making without looking directly down on the sight, which in the battlefield would mean either hovering over the gun, or pointing the gun at the sky. Both can reveal your position, and either require that you take your eyes off of the target or move the gun out of firing position.

I am going to have to download that episode. Suddenly the mystery of bullet drop makes sense to me. Now if there were only a way to quickly and easily calculate the deceleration of the bullet as it travels.

Cokebottle
11-03-2009, 2:56 PM
I am going to have to download that episode. Suddenly the mystery of bullet drop makes sense to me. Now if there were only a way to quickly and easily calculate the deceleration of the bullet as it travels.
The round still had plenty of energy when it skimmed the floor.

Here's the physics: http://blog.dotphys.net/2008/11/mythbusters-testing-bullet-proof-and-bullet-speeds/

He used the data from the AK47, and it dropped from 700m/s to under 400m/s over a distance of 500m.

There's a SLIGHT curve in the graph, but for the most part, it's pretty linear, so at 1000m (max range on the sight) you're probably looking at a velocity of around 300ft/sec. That's pretty consistent with the guns maximum range of 800m.

SPUTTER
11-03-2009, 8:58 PM
So Henry, have taken it to the range yet? I want to know!

Here's a little info on the AK sights. BTW: Yours is already sighted at the factory, but just some FYI.
http://www.ak-47.net/ak47/sightingin.html

John Z
11-03-2009, 9:24 PM
Awesome, thanks for the link.. I did find it very strange that something similar didnt come installed on the Saiga... And the way the safety/dust cover works is just very odd to me :eek: First rifle and unfamiliar with AK platform so I'm still gettin the hang of it... Thank for the input fellas. I still have no idea why the rear sight flips up :confused:

Henry, to add something far less valuable than what Cokebottle told you, is that when it's time to clean the Saiga and if you decide to use the "cleaning kit container" (for lack of a better word) instead of your fingers to move the axle pin and remove the gas tube, it's easier with the rear sight lifted and moved to the forward position (or maybe it's just me and my clumsy self).

Have a blast at the range. It's a cheap and fun gun. Too bad it's not as cheap as a Mosin Nagant.