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View Full Version : quick question : when did the 10day firearm waiting period go into effect in CA?


Clayface
11-01-2009, 8:28 PM
I am just curious. This question is really just to find out the process. Was it a proposition that was voted on? How did it come to be?

kurac
11-01-2009, 8:41 PM
a while ago, I am thinking 1990, 1991 or maybe 1992

jamesob
11-01-2009, 8:43 PM
if i remember right, i was 18 in 89 and it was a 5 day ,then later 15 day then back to 10. so for waiting periods it's been a while but i don't remember when the waiting period started. i did a quick search after posting and found this. http://www.firearmsandliberty.com/cramer.waiting.html

Librarian
11-01-2009, 9:35 PM
if i remember right, i was 18 in 89 and it was a 5 day ,then later 15 day then back to 10. so for waiting periods it's been a while but i don't remember when the waiting period started. i did a quick search after posting and found this. http://www.firearmsandliberty.com/cramer.waiting.html

You should also find the Calguns Foundation Wiki article (http://wiki.calgunsfoundation.org/index.php/Time_Line_of_California_Firearms_Laws#Firearms_pur chase_waiting_periods), which references Clayton's article:
Firearms purchase waiting periods

Actually beginning with one day for handguns in 1923, the California Legislature increased the handgun waiting period from one to three days in 1955, to five days in 1965, and to 15 days in 1975. (See a critical article on waiting periods by Clayton Cramer.) The current wait is 10 days from AB 671, effective April 1, 1997.

wilit
11-01-2009, 9:41 PM
California has also had a waiting period for handgun sales since at least 1923. The California Legislature increased the handgun waiting period from one to three days in 1955, to five days in 1965, and to the current 15 days in 1975. [2] Figure 1, "California Handgun Waiting Periods & Murder Rates" plots the murder rate per 100,000 Californians during the period 1952 through 1990. [3] (The use of a murder *rate*, which counts murders relative to the size of the population, eliminates changes in the number of murders caused by changes in the number of people living in California.)

The increase from one to three days in 1955, and from three to five days in 1965, had no apparent effect on rising murder rates. Indeed, the California murder rate went from a bit above 2/100,000 people in 1952, to over 10/100,000 by 1975. While it is certainly true that murder rates rose throughout the United States during this period, as Figure 1 shows, California's murder rate rose *even faster* than the murder rate for the rest of the United States.

The first full year of the fifteen day waiting period, 1976, showed a 1% decline in murder rates - followed by continually rising murder rates, peaking in 1980. In fact, murder rates didn't start to decline until 1981, five full years after the new waiting period took effect. Can the advocates of waiting periods take heart from the fact that California's murder rates *eventually* fell?

http://www.firearmsandliberty.com/cramer.waiting.html

So, here's a summary.
1923-1955, 1 day waiting period.
1955-1975, 3 day waiting period
1975-1997, 15 day waiting period
1997-Present, 10 day waiting period (dropped to 10 days with the addition of NICS)

EDIT: Damn, got beat by Librarian

bwiese
11-01-2009, 10:13 PM
I believe there's a typo above.

I am pretty confident the 15-day wait collapsed to 10-day wait in 1991, not 1997. I beleve this happened concurrent with all gun transactions needing to go thru an FFL, no paper-free PPTs, etc.

Librarian
11-01-2009, 10:21 PM
I believe there's a typo above.

I am pretty confident the 15-day wait collapsed to 10-day wait in 1991, not 1997. I beleve this happened concurrent with all gun transactions needing to go thru an FFL, no paper-free PPTs, etc.

SB 671, Lewis. Firearms: dealers' record of sale.
(1) Existing law prohibits the delivery of any pistol, revolver,
or other firearm capable of being concealed upon the person within 15
days of the application to purchase, the submission of any
correction to the application pursuant to certain requirements, or
the receipt of a specified fee, whichever occurs later. As of
January 1, 1996, the minimum period prior to delivery was reduced to
10 days in the case of a firearm other than a pistol, revolver, or
other firearm capable of being concealed upon the person.
This bill would reduce the minimum period prior to delivery to 10
days in the case of all firearms delivered on or after April 1, 1997.

Seems to have been a separate, later adjustment.

Librarian
11-01-2009, 10:23 PM
EDIT: Damn, got beat by Librarian

Only because I put it up on the Wiki on Sep 6 - it was already typed up!

jamesob
11-02-2009, 6:29 AM
I believe there's a typo above.

I am pretty confident the 15-day wait collapsed to 10-day wait in 1991, not 1997. I beleve this happened concurrent with all gun transactions needing to go thru an FFL, no paper-free PPTs, etc.

thats sounds about right

Turbinator
11-02-2009, 6:49 AM
I believe there's a typo above.

I am pretty confident the 15-day wait collapsed to 10-day wait in 1991, not 1997. I beleve this happened concurrent with all gun transactions needing to go thru an FFL, no paper-free PPTs, etc.

Bill, Gov Pete Wilson signed the 10 day wait into effect. I remember it vividly. :)

Turby