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coltn46920
11-01-2009, 8:12 AM
I heard that shooting with both eyes open is better? Is this true? I heard that closings one eye while shooting can damage your vision permanently. Is this true?

I find it impossible to shoot with both eyes open. I can't focus on the target. And flinching becomes a problem.

Sheepdog1968
11-01-2009, 8:20 AM
Shooting with both eyes open IMO is highly overrated and overemphasized. In real combat you are going to have tunnel vision anyway. Close one eye and be done with it. I've been shooting firearms and air rifles for 30 years and there has been no damage I am aware of because of thid. My prescription for my glasses has hardly changed over twenty years.

What I think is much more important is to practice shooting stong hand, weak hand including single handed. Much more likely to need this. Also do same for long arms.

Jonathan Doe
11-01-2009, 8:26 AM
I shoot competitively, and I shoot with both eyes open. When you look through the peep sights, you will see the difference between shooting with both eyes open and one eye closed. At least I see the difference.

maschronic
11-01-2009, 8:28 AM
i always try shooting with both eyes open. it helps me to see the surrounding while i'm aiming at the target.

when i'm shooting rifle, it is 1 eye open.

VegasND
11-01-2009, 8:34 AM
How does the vision in your two eyes compare? I'm left handed and, because of a bad astigmatism in the left, right eye dominant. I've had to adjust quite a bit to this and find it impossible to focus on sights or target with both eyes open. I also shoot long gun right handed because of the eyes.

A good shooting coach who understands the limitations people may have to work with can help.

five.five-six
11-01-2009, 8:36 AM
I like shooting with both eyes closed

Diablo
11-01-2009, 8:41 AM
Check out this thread. Good information here..

http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/showthread.php?t=80034

Beelzy
11-01-2009, 8:47 AM
I like shooting with both eyes closed

That would be the Home Defense tactic. :p

Both eyes open for Combat/Defensive shooting, one eye close for Target shooting.

You need to get good at both disciplines. ;)

As for eye dominance, let the strong eye dictate. Don't try like others do,
train your eye to the shooting. Train your shooting to your eye. It's more
instinctive and will let you focus more on the target and not the sights.
Which happens to be the main focus of "point shooting".

Another discipline one should be familiar with.

Happy Shooting!

cal3gunner
11-01-2009, 9:02 AM
...

HCz
11-01-2009, 9:30 AM
both eyes for me. the rationale I heard was that in shooting, you are more likely to have both eyes open, so might as well as go that way.

There was a time when I had difficulty with shooting with both eyes open, but after some practice it is now inconsequnetial.

ST5MF
11-01-2009, 10:44 AM
I heard that shooting with both eyes open is better? Is this true? I heard that closings one eye while shooting can damage your vision permanently. Is this true?

I find it impossible to shoot with both eyes open. I can't focus on the target. And flinching becomes a problem.

Shooting with both eyes open is paramount if you are combat shooting (you would not fight with one eye closed would you?) Focus should be on the front sight when shooting BTW.

The only damage that can come is the damage an adversary inflicts on you for closing your eye in a fight and you lose SA as a result (closing your eye).

It is not impossible- it just takes time doing it; once a shooter masters it he/she will never go back to the one eye (AMATUER) shooting. Sounds like you are not focusing on the front sight anyway- which may be your obstacle.

Flinching has nothing to do with sight picture IMO. Flinching is due to anticipating the gun going off.

Walk through your house with one eye closed then with both eyes open then...

Ask your self how you would rather fight if necessary.

ST5MF
11-01-2009, 10:45 AM
Shooting with both eyes open IMO is highly overrated and overemphasized. In real combat you are going to have tunnel vision anyway. Close one eye and be done with it. I've been shooting firearms and air rifles for 30 years and there has been no damage I am aware of because of thid. My prescription for my glasses has hardly changed over twenty years.

What I think is much more important is to practice shooting stong hand, weak hand including single handed. Much more likely to need this. Also do same for long arms.

No No NO.

MontanaRifleman
11-01-2009, 11:08 AM
Both eyes open. I have always done it this way and for me it is easier and more natural. Scope or iron sights, rifle, shotgun or pistol.

It sounds to me like you are trying to sight from your non-dominant eye. If your are right eye dominat you should learn to shoot right handed, or left eye dominant, then left handed.


Mark

NRAhighpowershooter
11-01-2009, 11:09 AM
I shoot with my weak side eye slightly drooped closed.. not fully open but not fully closed...

SuperSet
11-01-2009, 11:13 AM
Shooting with both eyes open is paramount if you are combat shooting (you would not fight with one eye closed would you?) Focus should be on the front sight when shooting BTW.

The only damage that can come is the damage an adversary inflicts on you for closing your eye in a fight and you lose SA as a result (closing your eye).

It is not impossible- it just takes time doing it; once a shooter masters it he/she will never go back to the one eye (AMATUER) shooting. Sounds like you are not focusing on the front sight anyway- which may be your obstacle.

Flinching has nothing to do with sight picture IMO. Flinching is due to anticipating the gun going off.

Walk through your house with one eye closed then with both eyes open then...

Ask your self how you would rather fight if necessary.

Now that's a great post!

Clayface
11-01-2009, 11:13 AM
I squint my left eye. But I don't completly close it. I could see people using the eye closed method when shooting out of iron sight.

ST5MF
11-01-2009, 3:34 PM
I squint my left eye. But I don't completly close it. I could see people using the eye closed method when shooting out of iron sight.

Why is that?

Midian
11-01-2009, 3:45 PM
Unfortunately for me it's impossible. My left eye suffered a cataract from a childhood injury, and I didn't get it removed until 2007. Through all those years my right eye led the charge and my left eye slid more and more out of alignment. Even with the lens implant I have now, I still have double vision (and it is exacerbated by fatigue, I can tell you) unless I wear a corrective lens.

At the age of 47, focusing in close like that gets harder and harder with both eyes...especially if one is off the rails.

I have to shoot with my right eye.

If that one goes, I move to scattergun only!

masameet
11-01-2009, 7:33 PM
... I find it impossible to shoot with both eyes open. I can't focus on the target. And flinching becomes a problem.

Find a good firearms instructor who can break down the fundamentals of shooting for you. You'll find that focusing on the target by seeing/sighting and flinching are two different aspects of shooting.

Here's two techniques to controlling/extinguishing flinching:

From the late Sgt. Paul Starzyk, Martinez (CA) PD (this is more mind control/attitude adjustment]: When you sight down the target, exhale and think "Press" as you pull back the trigger. Before you know it, you'll have pulled the trigger.

From Larry Glen, my firearms instructor: When dry firing your firearm, pay attention to the muscles of your trigger hand. If any muscles other than the trigger finger move, then you have to figure out how to keep those other muscles still.

Anyway I keep both of my eyes open as I sight down the barrel with the bullseye above the front sight. I'm left-eye dominant, with some astigmatism in the right eye, wear thick lensed eyeglasses, and am right-handed. Not to mention I'm a girl! :p

Also don't forget the benefits of bench rest shooting. If your hands are shaky, your grip or stance incorrect, you're tired, your firearm's sights are off, etc., resting your elbows on the stall table or on some carpeted block of wood will help you to suss out certain issues.

ocabj
11-01-2009, 7:43 PM
The reason why I shoot both eyes open is because it's natural. Your facial structure naturally prefers both eyes in the same state, open or closed. If you force one eye in a state not the same as the other, you're introducing strain to the eye you're using to aim with (and hopefully it's your dominant eye).

Notice how some competition shooters will use a blinder for their non-shooting eye? This is so they can isolate the vision so their only using their dominant eye to shoot, without having to close the other eye.

SJgunguy24
11-01-2009, 7:47 PM
I shoot with both eyes open most of the time. Pistols always, snap shooting and moving targets always. Long range rifle shots with optics, i'll go to one eye.
I learned with it really counts and i'm in the zone(from pistol competitions) I can see the round leave the barrel and follow it to the target. It a strange feeling, because I can see it and others can't.

joepamjohn
11-01-2009, 7:52 PM
Shooting any type of shotguns at flying (moving) targets is best accomplished by having both eyes open. Doing this helps you point and not aim at your target. When I shoot a rifle, I use one eye only.

SgtDinosaur
11-02-2009, 10:51 AM
I have been shutting my left eye for so many years that I don't think about it. I have forced myself leave it open upon occasion just to see what it's like. I can shoot both ways.

Clayface
11-02-2009, 10:59 AM
Why ?
Well I squint my left eye when shooting out at targets at 50-100yrds away only. I usually keep both eyes open when shooting with my shotgun. The reflex sight really makes it possible with no problems at all.

phish
11-02-2009, 11:02 AM
I usually use a blinder for the left eye typically, either tape or the cloth one that attaches to my shooting hat. It allows enough light into the left eye so there isn't a sympathetic enlarging of the right pupil.

Steyrlp10
11-02-2009, 12:41 PM
I usually use a blinder for the left eye typically, either tape or the cloth one that attaches to my shooting hat. It allows enough light into the left eye so there isn't a sympathetic enlarging of the right pupil.


Same here. Shooting with both eyes open for my type of competition causes less eye fatigue. I have an opaque "blinder" that I can flip up or down when I'm scoping the target or during target changes.

xrMike
11-02-2009, 1:05 PM
The reason why I shoot both eyes open is because it's natural. Your facial structure naturally prefers both eyes in the same state, open or closed. If you force one eye in a state not the same as the other, you're introducing strain to the eye you're using to aim with (and hopefully it's your dominant eye).

I figured that out soon after I first started shooting rifle with irons. If I closed my left eye, my right eye would tire sooner, and pretty early into the session I'd have a hard time getting a consistent sight picture. What I do now is take a 2-inch piece of translucent bandaging tape and slap it over the left-side lens of my shooting glasses and shoot with both eyes open. Can't see anything through the left side, and I can definitely shoot better for longer this way because my dominant eye doesn't get tired/strained as quickly.

With pistols I don't bother with the tape since I've trained long enough with picking up the front sight quickly with the dominant eye (and because sight picture doesn't have to be nearly as precise with pistol as for rifle).

xrMike
11-02-2009, 1:18 PM
I usually use a blinder for the left eye typically, either tape or the cloth one that attaches to my shooting hat. It allows enough light into the left eye so there isn't a sympathetic enlarging of the right pupil.Good point about pupils...

I also discovered in my own shooting that my eyesight is best when my pupils are smallest. I've tried shooting at mid-day with my prescription sunglasses on, and then with my clear prescription glasses, and I am always slightly more accurate and consistent with the clear lenses. I always attributed that to having smaller pupils with the clear lenses. Kind of like with a camera lens, how you get a little more distortion at wider f-stops (larger pupils) because the light has to be bent/refracted more through your cornea to form the image. ??? that's my theory anyway...

C.G.
11-02-2009, 6:17 PM
I shoot with both open, but had to re-learn since originally I was taught to shoot with one eye closed (in case of Kaboom, I would still have one eye left, I was told).

NSR500
11-03-2009, 2:21 AM
I shoot with both eyes open for almost all shots except for when I have to make a precision shot.

Rob454
11-03-2009, 2:30 PM
I heard that shooting with both eyes open is better? Is this true? I heard that closings one eye while shooting can damage your vision permanently. Is this true?

I find it impossible to shoot with both eyes open. I can't focus on the target. And flinching becomes a problem.


Shoot whichever way is accurate for you. For me its both eyes open. A sfor combat tunnel vision you can train yourself not to tunnel. it takes time and concentrationbut it can be done
THe vision damage is BS. Ive been shooting since i was 8 and I never had a problem and thats 30 years.