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View Full Version : Conservatives Maintain Edge as Top Ideological Group (Good news for guns in here)


CessnaDriver
10-26-2009, 3:20 PM
Conservatives Maintain Edge as Top Ideological Group
Compared with 2008, more Americans “conservative” in general, and on issues

http://www.gallup.com/poll/123854/Conservatives-Maintain-Edge-Top-Ideological-Group.aspx


"Public support for keeping the laws governing the sale of firearms the same or making them less strict rose from 49% in October 2008 to 55% in October 2009, also a record high. (The percentage saying the laws should become more strict -- the traditionally liberal position -- fell from 49% to 44%.)"




"Bottom Line

Americans are more likely to consider themselves conservative this year than they were in 2008, resulting in conservatives -- now 40% of the American public -- outnumbering moderates for the first time since 2004. While Gallup first documented this trend in June, the finding has been sustained through the third quarter.

Conservatism is most prevalent among Republicans. However, the overall increase in this ideological stance since 2008 comes largely from political independents, among whom 35% say they are conservatives thus far in 2009 -- compared with 29% last year. Independents have also become more conservative on a number of specific policy issues, including government and union power, the role of government relative to promoting values, gun laws, immigration, global warming, and abortion. Republicans, most of whom considered themselves ideologically conservative in 2008, have also grown more conservative on several of these issues this year, while less change is seen among Democrats.

All of this has potentially important implications at the ballot box, particularly for the 2010 midterm elections. The question is whether increased conservatism, particularly among independents, will translate into heightened support for Republican candidates. Right now, it appears it may. Although Gallup polling continues to show the Democratic Party leading the Republican Party in Americans' party identification, that lead has been narrowing since the beginning of the year and now stands at six points, the smallest since 2005. According to Gallup Managing Editor Jeff Jones, "the Democratic-Republican gap is narrowing because more independents now say they lean to the Republican Party." That trend aligns with the recent changes in how independents perceive their own ideology and where they stand on some key issues."

bwiese
10-26-2009, 4:05 PM
That's nice nationally, but not necessarily helpful in CA.

1859sharps
10-26-2009, 5:10 PM
even better news would be a poll that shows an increase in the number of people who do not think of themselves as conservative supporting the 2nd amendment is a individual right.

Vtec44
10-26-2009, 5:31 PM
That's nice nationally, but not necessarily helpful in CA.

Sadly true. :(

Doug L
10-27-2009, 8:55 AM
That's nice nationally, but not necessarily helpful in CA.

Actually, this is very good news, and should be greeted by us as such.

This is exactly the kind of ammunition (no double entendre intended) we need, to try and put a spine back into the California Republican party. The growing Second Amendment sentiment---in general---evidenced by the poll must be used to reassure and convince the excessively meek, timid party "leadership," that defending and preserving our Second Amendment rights from anti-Constitutional forces* is a winning issue and they need to get behind it 100%.

Think positively, and stay on offense!!


* Which is the way it ought to be phrased.

bwiese
10-27-2009, 9:52 AM
Actually, this is very good news, and should be greeted by us as such.

This is exactly the kind of ammunition (no double entendre intended) we need, to try and put a spine back into the California Republican party


You think "adding spine" to CA Rs gets them elected?

The problem is CA R party has too much spine in some areas - so much so, it's candidates are unelectable to general statewide office. Yes, they can elect a dogcatcher in Orange County. But have you seen any statewide up-list Republican office holders other than the insurance commissioner? Or governor (whose only chance at winning was to repudiate key R party stances?) How come only ~1/3 of the legislature are Rs? [Even with gerrymandering favoring Democrats they still should have way more seats.]

That tells you their marketing and some stances suck, at least as viewed by majority of Californians that vote.

However in other senses you are correct that CA Republicans need a spine in terms of gunrights matters. They've been assuming our default support and haven't shown us much love other than voting "No" on bills - with exception of a few good guys like Doug LaMalfa and Curt Hagman and a few others, they aren't running bills for us. (One R legislator told gunnies that he "forgot" to carry a bill for us.)


The growing Second Amendment sentiment---in general---evidenced by the poll must be used to reassure and convince the excessively meek, timid party "leadership," that defending and preserving our Second Amendment rights from anti-Constitutional forces* is a winning issue and they need to get behind it 100%.


Yeah, RKBA sentiment is great. Tell California Republicans about it.

But other issues (choice/abortion) are 100% losing issues for non-sub-regional Republicans in California.

Tell them to start putting up electable candidates. Danny Lungren clones will never again get statewide office in CA.

Mike d'Ocla
10-27-2009, 11:18 AM
I would take this poll with several pounds of salt. Overall "conservative" numbers may be at 40% but the combination of "moderate" and
"liberal" numbers adds up to 56%. That's a very big difference.

The other problem is defining what "conservative", "moderate", and "liberal" mean. If this is the self-assessment of those polled, then the designations are very nearly meaningless.

Most people, even, and perhaps especially, those on calguns, have very-poorly developed notions about the definition and evolving history of "conservative" ideology.

For example most uninformed people consider George W. Bush to have been a "conservative." He was anything but. He was quite a radical with regard to changing the constitutional balance of power between branches of government in favor of the "unitary executive." In other words towards being a king.