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locosway
10-22-2009, 10:53 PM
Curious, is there a restriction on the type and caliber of firearm that one can carry? Or is it decided by the employer? If so, what do they usually restrict it to?

Big D
10-22-2009, 11:10 PM
Security officers in California are required to have a guard card as well as a firearms card. The firearms card lists the calibers that the officers has qualified with and thus is allowed to carry. Every new caliber must be added to the firearms permit. Common calibers include the common LE calibers 9mm 38, 40, 45. State law only dictates the caliber, what make model is up to the employer, provided the firearm is legal within state law. I know some armored transport companies also have shotguns on their trucks

locosway
10-22-2009, 11:11 PM
So, as long as you qualify and it's not something crazy like a .44 magnum it's ok?

Greg-Dawg
10-22-2009, 11:36 PM
.40 ninjitsu caliber.

CSDGuy
10-23-2009, 12:34 AM
You have to shoot a qualification COF for each caliber you intend to carry on your Gun Permit. If I qualified in .32 ACP, .380., 9 mm, .40 S&W, 10 mm, and .45 ACP, and I qualified using a semi-auto in all of those calibers, I can also carry a revolver that is chambered in those calibers. And yes, as long as you can shoot the COF with .44 magnum, you'd be OK to carry that caliber (as far as the BSIS is concerned). Your employer may restrict you to a certain type of weapon though.

locosway
10-23-2009, 12:35 AM
Alright, thanks.

randy
10-23-2009, 2:34 AM
I've only seen 38/357,9mm, .40, and .45 for BSIS. Other calibers are fine for a CCW.

MP301
10-23-2009, 12:30 PM
Security officers in California are required to have a guard card as well as a firearms card. The firearms card lists the calibers that the officers has qualified with and thus is allowed to carry. Every new caliber must be added to the firearms permit. Common calibers include the common LE calibers 9mm 38, 40, 45. State law only dictates the caliber, what make model is up to the employer, provided the firearm is legal within state law. I know some armored transport companies also have shotguns on their trucks

BSIS regulates only that you qualify with any caliber that you intend to carry. They do not restrict the type of firearm. There is no minimum or maximum caliber. I have seen .22 on a permit before as well as .44 mag.

Restrictions will be by the employer. For liability reasons as well as common sense applications, your employer may restrict you to whats commonly used for law enforcement.. this piggy backs liability issues so that if you ever shoot someone, that persons family or lawyer cant play the dirty harry card cause you ventilated him with a .44, etc.

And, some contracts might require a certain firearm class as well. There used to be government contracts that specified revolver only. I dont know if there still those out there or not because after 9/11, most government contracts of a sensitive nature require assualt rifles.

Shotguns and rifles are not regulated by BSIS in any way at this time. Just like tasers, thier position is to stay out of it. They want nothing to do with them.

There was a recent push, because of the givernment contracts requiring shotguns and rifles, to be able to add these calibers to your gun card, but as of yet, it has failed.

Back in the 80's, I worked for a private trucking company that transported top secret and explosives for the Dept of Defense. Upon being hired as the security supervisor for the facility, I was tasked at making sure all of the transport trucks complied with CA law while fulfilling the Federal obligations to carry shotguns.

It was determined by all of the agencies involved that, like armored carriers, the trucking company followed CHP and PUC regulations... so shotguns were ok...with training. I had an instructer come to the facility and run every driver through a basic NRA shotgun course and everyone was happy.

There was still an issue with CA (CHP) not wanting the shotguns loaded in the vehicles and that was an ongoing thing, but most of the trucks spent the majority of time out of state so it was never resolved. I think if the company had just thrown up its hands and declined to spend any more money on the issue (The Feds only required shotguns, not that they were loaded - duh), I would have gotten around this problem by getting the drivered guard/gun cards, etc.

Myself and my facility security crew ran around everywhere with a loaded shotguns, but the drivers couldnt load up (they did anyway) until they hit the state line.

So, there are special sections in the code for Armored transport for shotguns...just not through BSIS.

The reality is that, with your employers blessing, you can keep an "unloaded" shotgun or rifle in your patrol vehicle and not be breaking any law. Where you would run afowl of things is if you had to use it. i would think the circumstances would have to be pretty extreme....

Brianguy
10-23-2009, 12:58 PM
Qualify with a s&w 500 if your boss will let ya carry it :D

You can qualify in any caliber. I've seen a whole lot of calibers on some Exposed Firearm Permits.

B Strong
10-23-2009, 1:07 PM
Curious, is there a restriction on the type and caliber of firearm that one can carry? Or is it decided by the employer? If so, what do they usually restrict it to?

I haven't heard of caliber restrictions, but some companies limit type, no wheelguns, no single-action autos.

sytfu_RR
10-23-2009, 1:12 PM
It's pretty much up to your employer, I have a friend who works for a government contracted company and they get .38 revolvers, and that's what they have to carry, even if he wanted to carry a semi auto he's not allowed to. The company I work for it's pretty much carry anything, but we do try to stay within what police carry to help avoid any legal technicalities if we did ever had to use our weapons in defense. We can carry Tasers ( Civi Model ) as well, open/concealed depending on city. I've heard conflicting stories about shotguns, as far as I know I thought it was okay as long as you abide by state/local laws for transport. Glad to hear I was correct.