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Friendo
10-13-2009, 8:40 PM
Gun control
Right to bear arms
Oct 12th 2009
From Economist.com

Support for banning handguns continues to fall in America

DESPITE electing an unusually liberal president, on at least one measure Americans are more conservative than at any time before. Public support for a ban on handguns has fallen to 28%, the lowest level in nearly 50 years, according to a new poll from Gallup. When Americans were first asked the question in 1959, 60% were in favour of introducing a law to ban handguns, but support has declined steadily. Enthusiasm for stricter laws relating to the sale of firearms is also ebbing, falling from 78% in 1990 to 44% today. Polls suggest that 43% believe laws should not be made tougher.
35162
AFP
http://www.economist.com/daily/chartgallery/displayStory.cfm?story_id=14632169&source=most_commented

sierratangofoxtrotunion
10-13-2009, 9:23 PM
Link to the gallup poll: http://www.gallup.com/poll/123596/In-U.S.-Record-Low-Support-Stricter-Gun-Laws.aspx

October 9, 2009
In U.S., Record-Low Support for Stricter Gun Laws
Forty-four percent favor stricter laws on firearm sales
by Jeffrey M. Jones
PRINCETON, NJ -- Gallup finds a new low of 44% of Americans saying the laws covering firearm sales should be made more strict. That is down 5 points in the last year and 34 points from the high of 78% recorded the first time the question was asked, in 1990.

Today, Americans are as likely to say the laws governing gun sales should be kept as they are now (43%) as to say they should be made more strict. Until this year, Gallup had always found a significantly higher percentage advocating stricter laws. At the same time, 12% of Americans believe the laws should be less strict, which is low in an absolute sense but ties the highest Gallup has measured for this response.

These results are based on Gallup's annual Crime Poll, conducted Oct.1-4 this year.

The poll also shows a new low in the percentage of Americans favoring a ban on handgun possession except by the police and other authorized persons, a question that dates back to 1959. Only 28% now favor such a ban. The high point in support for a handgun-possession ban was 60% in the initial measurement in 1959. Since then, less than a majority has been in favor, and support has been below 40% since December 1993.

The trends on the questions about gun-sale laws and a handgun-possession ban indicate that Americans' attitudes have moved toward being more pro-gun rights. But this is not due to a growth in personal gun ownership, which has held steady around 30% this decade, or to an increase in household gun ownership, which has been steady in the low 40% range since 2000.

Nor are more pro-gun attitudes a specific reaction to the election of a Democratic president, Barack Obama, whose support for gun rights is questioned at times. Though the trends on both the gun-sales and the gun-possession measures have moved in a slightly more pro-gun direction this year compared to last, both trends had been moving in that direction during the latter part of the Bush administration, which strongly supported gun rights.

Rather, Americans as a whole may just be more accepting of gun rights now than in the past. Compared with views in 2000, each major demographic or attitudinal subgroup has shown a shift toward a more pro-gun stance on the question about whether gun laws should be more strict or less strict. (The results are similar on the question of a ban on handgun possession, with nearly every major demographic group less supportive of a ban now than at the start of the decade.)

Even with the change, there are some subgroups among whom a majority continues to favor stricter gun laws, including liberals (67%), Democrats (66%), Easterners (59%), gun non-owners (57%), postgraduates (55%), women (55%), and nonwhites (51%).

The groups least in favor of stricter gun laws are gun owners (20%), Republicans (28%), conservatives (30%), and men (33%).

Bottom Line

Americans continue to trend toward holding attitudes that are more in favor of gun rights, and Gallup today finds new low points in favor of gun control on two separate measures dating back at least two decades. While solidly against a ban on handgun possession, Americans are nonetheless about equally likely to say they favor stricter laws on firearm sales as to say these laws should not change. Still, the current poll marks the first time Gallup has not found a significantly higher proportion of Americans preferring tighter gun-sale regulations.

Survey Methods

Results are based on telephone interviews with 1,013 national adults, aged 18 and older, conducted Oct. 1-4, 2009. For results based on the total sample of national adults, one can say with 95% confidence that the maximum margin of sampling error is ±4 percentage points.

Interviews are conducted with respondents on land-line telephones (for respondents with a land-line telephone) and cellular phones (for respondents who are cell-phone only).

In addition to sampling error, question wording and practical difficulties in conducting surveys can introduce error or bias into the findings of public opinion polls.

sierratangofoxtrotunion
10-13-2009, 9:26 PM
http://sas-origin.onstreammedia.com/origin/gallupinc/GallupSpaces/Production/Cms/POLL/wcxhxkuevkcy-dpw4eza3w.gif

http://sas-origin.onstreammedia.com/origin/gallupinc/GallupSpaces/Production/Cms/POLL/4_gtono2u06uunznj2_hxw.gif

http://sas-origin.onstreammedia.com/origin/gallupinc/GallupSpaces/Production/Cms/POLL/dpo7h0egbeq-uquadkndmq.gif

http://sas-origin.onstreammedia.com/origin/gallupinc/GallupSpaces/Production/Cms/POLL/m4dt5oao2k2daqs0rwisha.gif

I like the last one the best. Interesting that in EVERY SINGLE SUBGROUP, fewer people are in favor of more gun control. Almost all are down by double digits, and all are greater than the margin of error.

RRangel
10-13-2009, 9:34 PM
I like the last one the best. Interesting that in EVERY SINGLE SUBGROUP, fewer people are in favor of more gun control.

It's just that when you look around we've seen it all. From crime increases in the UK after banning firearms to zero accomplishment with our own "assault weapon" ban. It didn't accomplish anything except to set a terrible precedent.

Our own state grows worse every year not only in gun control, but in many other respects despite being a supposedly cutting edge progressive model. What sane people want to follow a bad example?

MrPlutonium
10-13-2009, 9:34 PM
Looks like the younger crowd is getting it too so take that, old people! Callin us no good..

wilit
10-13-2009, 9:54 PM
Am I the only one that finds it highly suspicious that 60% of the people polled in the 1960's would support the banning of handguns?

Mssr. Eleganté
10-13-2009, 10:03 PM
Am I the only one that finds it highly suspicious that 60% of the people polled in the 1960's would support the banning of handguns?

Handguns were almost included as "firearms" in the 1934 NFA and would have been regulated the same as machineguns and silencers if the antis could have gotten a few more votes. Many Americans saw handguns as tools only for outlaws and policemen. They were happy to stick with their hunting rifles and shotguns and their "militia" rifles.

Now that America is more urban and property crime is so much higher, people see handguns much more as a self defense tool. Here in San Francisco I know several people who think hunting is only for psychopaths and military style rifles are for wack-jobs, but don't try to take their 9mm away from them.

armandolo
10-14-2009, 1:10 AM
It's all about public perception. We do hear now and then that AW ban was ineffective and that the crime has dropped despite the increase in gun ownership (I know the percentage stayed about the same but the population grew, therefore the gun ownership grew). They do not show that enough on the news but it does pop up now and then. We need to increase public awareness that gun owners are responsible people are everywhere. Their co-workers, friends, neighbors etc.

Mitch
10-14-2009, 6:01 AM
Poor Economist. Their editorial slant is strongly in favor of gun control.

Back in the nineties they published an article about firearms related crime in, I think, Britain, and the last sentence of the article actually said something to the effect the gun controls laws aren't working. But the editorial leader in the front of the newspaper ranted in favor of gun control.

So you can see how sometime even smart people (and they are pretty smart at the Economist) can't deal appropriately with facts.

gewgaw
10-14-2009, 6:20 AM
I want to know who those 20% of gun owners are who want stricter gun control!

Mitch
10-14-2009, 6:25 AM
I want to know who those 20% of gun owners are who want stricter gun control!

Zumbos.

bulgron
10-14-2009, 6:32 AM
I want to know who those 20% of gun owners are who want stricter gun control!

1. People with mental disorders
2. People who are ill-informed
3. Statist political leaders who just really want to control everyone around them.

trashman
10-14-2009, 7:50 AM
Zumbos.

Or people who inherited grand-dad's double-gun when he passed away - but wouldn't know what to do with it.

--Neill

trashman
10-14-2009, 7:59 AM
So you can see how sometime even smart people (and they are pretty smart at the Economist) can't deal appropriately with facts.

In their defense (and I use the word defense very, very mildly..) it reflects the British cultural sensibility about guns. They see the proliferation of guns as a very uniquely American thing.

I was living in London not long after the Dunblane Massacre (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dunblane_massacre) -- and the political debate around banning handguns was in full swing under the Tory government -- and there wasn't much debate, really. To a person pretty much every article I read about it, and every Brit I talked to about it thought banning handguns was the ethical thing to do following the Dunblane incident.

So yeah - the folks at the Economist do have a Euro-Brit slant on cultural issues like this, but they can't help it.

--Neill

johnny_22
10-14-2009, 8:08 AM
Those folks in Britain really believe they know better than us.

Mitch
10-14-2009, 8:16 AM
Those folks in Britain really believe they know better than us.

I'm so glad I live in a country that doesn't collectively think it knows better than everyone else and stomps around the planet enforcing its will.

tombinghamthegreat
10-14-2009, 8:56 AM
1. People with mental disorders
2. People who are ill-informed
3. Statist political leaders who just really want to control everyone around them.
4. Iggy
5. Gun stores who spread FUD

fixed

bomb_on_bus
10-14-2009, 10:23 AM
I want to know who those 20% of gun owners are who want stricter gun control!

My thoughts exactly!

Glock22Fan
10-14-2009, 10:40 AM
a Democratic president, Barack Obama, whose support for gun rights is questioned at times.

Isn't that a bit like saying some people have occasionally questioned whether Ellen DeGeneres really is straight?

socal2310
10-14-2009, 11:14 AM
...a Democratic president, Barack Obama, whose support for gun rights is questioned at times. Isn't that a bit like saying some people have occasionally questioned whether Ellen DeGeneres really is straight?

Now that there is some signature worthy material. Hope you don't mind.

Ryan

GoodEyeSniper
10-14-2009, 11:57 AM
I'm so glad I live in a country that doesn't collectively think it knows better than everyone else and stomps around the planet enforcing its will.

:TFH:

I see what you did there...

tiki
10-14-2009, 12:21 PM
I want to know who those 20% of gun owners are who want stricter gun control!

Democratic Politicians.

Nodda Duma
10-14-2009, 1:25 PM
I thought it interesting that the least percentage drop was in the age 50-64 range...ie the Baby Boomers. The generation who brought us hippies!

-Jason

LG1980
10-14-2009, 6:26 PM
My guess is - cops.
Plus, believe it or not, there are certainly a number of liberal gun owners who either 1) think having more gun control is better for the society at large and or 2) think that if their guns were taken away eventually, that it really wouldn't be the end of the world

Not all gun owners think that people should own them however, whenever, whatever they choose. Guess living in Alaska is out for those people.


I want to know who those 20% of gun owners are who want stricter gun control!

LG1980
10-14-2009, 6:40 PM
I'm so glad I live in a country that doesn't collectively think it knows better than everyone else and stomps around the planet enforcing its will.

You mean like the way the British did before their boys collectively lost their testicles sometime in the mid 20th century?

I say that the country you've mentioned above doesn't stomp hard enough. If it did, the British would shut the f up already.

advocatusdiaboli
10-14-2009, 7:34 PM
I want to know who those 20% of gun owners are who want stricter gun control!

Law enforcement--they want you to lose YOUR guns but they get to keep THEIRS no matter what. In a way I don't blame them on their point of view because they face others with guns more than they want--doesn't mean I agree--I just understand it is all.

advocatusdiaboli
10-14-2009, 7:35 PM
"Our enemies are innovative and resourceful, and so are we.
They never stop thinking about new ways to harm our country and our people, and neither do we."
George W. Bush

ROTFL. Oh wait...it's true...he really did:mad:

Mulay El Raisuli
10-15-2009, 7:18 AM
Poor Economist. Their editorial slant is strongly in favor of gun control.

Back in the nineties they published an article about firearms related crime in, I think, Britain, and the last sentence of the article actually said something to the effect the gun controls laws aren't working. But the editorial leader in the front of the newspaper ranted in favor of gun control.

So you can see how sometime even smart people (and they are pretty smart at the Economist) can't deal appropriately with facts.


If they can't deal appropriately with the facts, then their level of 'smart' has to be in question.

The Raisuli