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View Full Version : What's It Worth? *MORE PICS*


Jason762
10-05-2009, 9:55 AM
http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d12/Jason762/M1%20Garand/M1GarandHeel.jpg

http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d12/Jason762/M1%20Garand/M1GarandRightSidewithflash.jpg

http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d12/Jason762/M1%20Garand/BarrelShot01.jpg

http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d12/Jason762/M1%20Garand/IMG_1095.jpg

http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d12/Jason762/M1%20Garand/BarrelCode.jpg

http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d12/Jason762/M1%20Garand/M1GarandBolt.jpg

Barrel Mark (http://s32.photobucket.com/albums/d12/Jason762/M1%20Garand/?action=view&current=Markonundersideofbarrel.jpg)

Op Rod Codes (http://s32.photobucket.com/albums/d12/Jason762/M1%20Garand/?action=view&current=OpRodCodes.jpg)

Receiver Codes (http://s32.photobucket.com/albums/d12/Jason762/M1%20Garand/?action=view&current=ReceiverCodes.jpg)

Rear right sight (http://s32.photobucket.com/albums/d12/Jason762/M1%20Garand/?action=view&current=Rightsight.jpg)

Trigger housing codes (http://s32.photobucket.com/albums/d12/Jason762/M1%20Garand/?action=view&current=TriggerCodes.jpg)

Cartouche stamp (http://s32.photobucket.com/albums/d12/Jason762/M1%20Garand/?action=view&current=RRACartoucheonleftsidepistolgrip.jpg)

RRA cartouche is on the left side of the pistol grip.

If, if I wanted to sell it, what would it be worth?

Let me know if you need more pics or w/e.

Thanks,
Jason

olhunter
10-05-2009, 10:12 AM
$200-300. But I'll give you $400 and even pick it up.:D







j/k. I would guess in the $800-900 range? I thought you had a 4-digit serial number, but your masking faked me out.

reidnez
10-05-2009, 10:12 AM
Any idea as to muzzle and throat erosion? That can affect the price quite a bit. If you don't want to shell out for the gauges, you could probably find someone on these boards who has one, or take it to a gunsmith who will likely gauge it for free.

Assuming the barrel isn't shot-out and there isn't any rust that we aren't seeing, I would say it's worth $800-$1,000 in today's market. A dealer like Turner's would probably price it around $1,200 on consignment.

EDIT: the blanked-out S/N faked me out, too. Anyway, I'm not sure how many extra digits you are covering up so here's a site where you can date your rifle, just in case you hadn't looked this up before:

http://www.fulton-armory.com/tea/m1serial.htm

But I'd say keep it!

Jason762
10-05-2009, 11:33 AM
If I'm doing it right the serial number tells me this was made early-mid December of 1938.

glennsche
10-05-2009, 11:43 AM
looks pretty good! if i was on the price is right, i'd say 850-1k?

smle-man
10-05-2009, 12:18 PM
It's a 2 million range, correct? If so barrel is in the range of the s.n. working from memory, stock is marked Red River Arsenal for a rebuild or overhaul. Looks like a usual service grade which goes about $600 which is a good deal.

campperrykid
10-05-2009, 1:03 PM
How's the match-up of the drawing numbers on the rest of the parts?
Need pic's of the right side of the rear sight.
Pic's of the op rod where the round part meets the squared off part.
Also need the info from the right front of the reciever.

Farquaad
10-05-2009, 1:23 PM
If you just post those pics and offer it for sale I would guess 700-800 for a fair chance at an easy sale. More than that you might get and you might not and it would probably take longer. We are in a recession here, it does make a difference unfortunately. The only thing I would suggest is if you have one place a bullet in the muzzle for a poor mans MW gauge and clean up the bore so the buyers can see it in its bright and shiny state. It would help with the sale and probably make a few bucks difference.

NRAhighpowershooter
10-05-2009, 3:02 PM
going by the pics and the rifle looks and depending on the bolt drawing number and the trigger housing drawing number as well as the op rod numbers.. $650- $750 and that will also depend on the muzzle wear and throat erosion.

jamesob
10-05-2009, 4:48 PM
700.00 maybe more to someone who really wants it bad.

Jason762
10-08-2009, 8:24 PM
So posting these additional photos didn't change anything?

NRAhighpowershooter
10-08-2009, 8:31 PM
well.. correct barrel date.. correct op rod and trigger housing... rear sights are not correct as is the stock.. what are the markings on the bolt?

Jason762
10-08-2009, 8:34 PM
well.. correct barrel date.. correct op rod and trigger housing... rear sights are not correct as is the stock.. what are the markings on the bolt?

http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d12/Jason762/M1%20Garand%20Pics/M1GarandBolt.jpg

Nodda Duma
10-08-2009, 8:53 PM
Bolt's correct as well, looks like. Pretty nice. Where'd you get it?

-Jason

Jason762
10-08-2009, 8:56 PM
Bolt's correct as well, looks like. Pretty nice. Where'd you get it?

-Jason

Here on CalGuns from another seller.

NRAhighpowershooter
10-08-2009, 9:16 PM
Bolt's correct as well, looks like. Pretty nice. Where'd you get it?

-Jason

a -2 is not corect for a 2mil.. it should be a -12 bolt

Nodda Duma
10-08-2009, 10:51 PM
Oops.. thanks for the correction :)

a -2 is not corect for a 2mil.. it should be a -12 bolt

thefifthspeed
10-08-2009, 11:09 PM
You're pretty close to making the rifle "correct" if you wanted to hunt the parts down and trade on boards like CMP you would increase the value. The hardest (and most expensive) part to get correct would be the stock. Is there any other cartouches on the stock other than the RRA rebuild stamp? A correct rifle with matching stock will bump the value over $1000.

Jason762
10-09-2009, 7:52 AM
Damn, how can you tell the stock is incorrect? Is the RRA stamp a rip-off as well?

I'll look for other stamps, but I don't believe there are any other than a white square by the rear sling swivel.

In it's current state, what could I get for it? From the low end to high end. $800-$950?

Thanks,
Jason

AgentAK
10-09-2009, 8:18 AM
Damn, how can you tell the stock is incorrect? Is the RRA stamp a rip-off as well?

I'll look for other stamps, but I don't believe there are any other than a white square by the rear sling swivel.

In it's current state, what could I get for it? From the low end to high end. $800-$950?

Thanks,
Jason

I see quite a few of them for sale here for that price range, but don't see them moving too fast. I do know that you can get a S.A. service grade for $600.00, like others have stated.

thefifthspeed
10-09-2009, 8:33 PM
Damn, how can you tell the stock is incorrect? Is the RRA stamp a rip-off as well?

I'll look for other stamps, but I don't believe there are any other than a white square by the rear sling swivel.

In it's current state, what could I get for it? From the low end to high end. $800-$950?

Thanks,
Jason

I can't tell by the photos if the stock is correct or not but the RRA is a common stamp meaning that the rifle has been through a re-arsenal. So it could be an original stock with a RRA stamp being added to it later or it could be a plain jane replacement stock with a RRA stamp.

If you can find a SA/GAW with Small Ordnance Wheel with 3/16" Ordnance Escutcheon on the grip you have a winner (it would be original or at least correct). Check the left side of the stock near the grip, if it's there, it's likely to be very faded.

In it's current state I would tag it from low to high as $600-$800. There are always impulsive, unknowledgeable buyers who may pay above $1000 but if you were to market it to people "in the know" I would say 600-800 is about right.

campperrykid
10-10-2009, 5:11 AM
The rifle is perfect. It is exactly what it is , likely without tampering.
That makes it a valuable historic artifact. Market price in dollars is a different issue.

Damn, how can you tell the stock is incorrect? Is the RRA stamp a rip-off as well?

I'll look for other stamps, but I don't believe there are any other than a white square by the rear sling swivel.

In it's current state, what could I get for it? From the low end to high end. $800-$950?

Thanks,
Jason

The rifle is a great example of an "as issued " M1 Garand that was rebuilt after WW2. The kind of rifle that the Allied nations used in Korea.
Most early ( pre-1950's) barrels have not survived because of corrosive ammo and hard use under harsh conditions.

TregoMark
10-10-2009, 8:38 PM
The rifle is perfect. It is exactly what it is , likely without tampering.
That makes it a valuable historic artifact. Market price in dollars is a different issue.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason762
Damn, how can you tell the stock is incorrect? Is the RRA stamp a rip-off as well?

I'll look for other stamps, but I don't believe there are any other than a white square by the rear sling swivel.

In it's current state, what could I get for it? From the low end to high end. $800-$950?

Thanks,
Jason

The rifle is a great example of an "as issued " M1 Garand that was rebuilt after WW2. The kind of rifle that the Allied nations used in Korea.
Most early ( pre-1950's) barrels have not survived because of corrosive ammo and hard use under harsh conditions.


Ditto ^ Do not mess with that rifle!! It is a very nice example of a Garand from the post WWII clean and repair program. Too many of these rifles have been made "correct" with the addition of a few parts. Don't make that mistake. You will turn a nice historic weapon into just another parts gun with no value beyond the sum total of it's parts.

Jason762
10-10-2009, 10:23 PM
If you can find a SA/GAW with Small Ordnance Wheel with 3/16" Ordnance Escutcheon on the grip you have a winner (it would be original or at least correct). Check the left side of the stock near the grip, if it's there, it's likely to be very faded.

Didn't see that symbol but on the bottom of the pistol grip was something like this:


__
|P


Basically a P inside a square "C".


The rifle is perfect. It is exactly what it is , likely without tampering.
That makes it a valuable historic artifact. Market price in dollars is a different issue.

Ditto ^ Do not mess with that rifle!! It is a very nice example of a Garand from the post WWII clean and repair program. Too many of these rifles have been made "correct" with the addition of a few parts. Don't make that mistake. You will turn a nice historic weapon into just another parts gun with no value beyond the sum total of it's parts.

Didn't plan on messing with it any. It's my first rifle ever, and I'm having a hard time deciding what to do with it.

I either want to trade it for a Glock 17 or 19 + rebuild kits, sell it for the highest amount I can get (looking like $900) or keeping it.

It never gets fired, and I have a tendency to throw out/sell unused objects. But like I said, it's my first rifle; and as sentimental value to me.

Decisions, decisions...

thefifthspeed
10-11-2009, 9:50 AM
Didn't see that symbol but on the bottom of the pistol grip was something like this:


__
|P


Basically a P inside a square "C".






Didn't plan on messing with it any. It's my first rifle ever, and I'm having a hard time deciding what to do with it.

I either want to trade it for a Glock 17 or 19 + rebuild kits, sell it for the highest amount I can get (looking like $900) or keeping it.

It never gets fired, and I have a tendency to throw out/sell unused objects. But like I said, it's my first rifle; and as sentimental value to me.

Decisions, decisions...

The P mark under the grip is a proof stamp, most if not all arsenaled stocks have these.

As for the 2 other posters above, it really doesn't matter if you switch the parts around because odds are that this rifle has been re-arsenaled several times. If the rifle made its way to you via CMP --> private party ---> You, then it's likely more parts were replaced or swaped. Basically what I'm saying is there is no way to tell if this rifle is "untouched" since being re-arsenled the 1st time after it was original. But to let you know it may not be worth all of the trouble to hunt down "correct parts" just to bump it up 100 bucks or so. Usually when people do this they do it for the fun of hunting down the parts and not for adding value.

campperrykid
10-12-2009, 9:07 AM
History is history. Switching parts based on " book correct " doesn't increase the value of the parts. I can't claim any moral purity in this area: I have sold my share of " Collector Restoration Parts " sometimes at unreal prices that made obscene profits.

It's very possible to tell the real deal from a fake with some fairly high ( but varying ) degree of certainty. It's an art that takes experience.
No knowledgable buyer will pay more more than the sum of parts for a " humped " rifle .
The only way to make money humping historic guns is to misrepresent -- actively or passively -- what the gun really is.
FWIW and YMMV.

Jason762
10-12-2009, 8:02 PM
Well, I've got it up for trade, but for 7 days only...

http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/showthread.php?t=230906

thefifthspeed
10-13-2009, 7:11 AM
History is history. Switching parts based on " book correct " doesn't increase the value of the parts. I can't claim any moral purity in this area: I have sold my share of " Collector Restoration Parts " sometimes at unreal prices that made obscene profits.

It's very possible to tell the real deal from a fake with some fairly high ( but varying ) degree of certainty. It's an art that takes experience.
No knowledgable buyer will pay more more than the sum of parts for a " humped " rifle .
The only way to make money humping historic guns is to misrepresent -- actively or passively -- what the gun really is.
FWIW and YMMV.

You're not understanding.

People take mixmasters and try and hunt down parts to make all of the parts period correct, hence the tern "correct grade". This means that the parts may not all be original but all of them are stamped with what they should be. People who buy correct grade Garands understand (or they should) that the parts probably aren't original.

Then we have "original rifles" that are as issued as is and all of the parts are matching. Guns represented as original should never have parts swapped out. Selling a gun that has been forced correct and passing it off as original is morally wrong and dishonest.

Yes, people do pay more for "correct rifles", people also pay more, a lot more, for original rifles.

As a reference I would say roughly a WW2 dated Garand breaks down as follows:

Mixmaster : 600-800
Correct: 900-1000
Original 1800-2200

There are a lot of variables that go into value like date of manufacture, condition, and market value but I think you get the picture.

AgentAK
10-13-2009, 9:14 AM
Absolutely brilliant marketing strategy!

Jason762
10-13-2009, 9:48 AM
Absolutely brilliant marketing strategy!

What is?

campperrykid
10-13-2009, 12:10 PM
Actually , I do understand.
You're not understanding.

People take mixmasters and try and hunt down parts to make all of the parts period correct, hence the tern "correct grade". This means that the parts may not all be original but all of them are stamped with what they should be. People who buy correct grade Garands understand (or they should) that the parts probably aren't original.

Then we have "original rifles" that are as issued as is and all of the parts are matching. Guns represented as original should never have parts swapped out. Selling a gun that has been forced correct and passing it off as original is morally wrong and dishonest.

Yes, people do pay more for "correct rifles", people also pay more, a lot more, for original rifles.

As a reference I would say roughly a WW2 dated Garand breaks down as follows:

Mixmaster : 600-800
Correct: 900-1000
Original 1800-2200

There are a lot of variables that go into value like date of manufacture, condition, and market value but I think you get the picture.

"... people do pay more for " correct rifles ... "

Some do , some don't.
I don't and won't. YMMV. I make no claim to moral purity.

Wanna buy a WW2 Winchester Garand barrel : guages really great -- around 1.5 at the throat , 2. something at the muzzle (it's been kissed with a crowning tool , prolly in Denmark ). It's a valuable historic artifact , I don't want to shoot it.
How about an uncut ( half moon ) SA op rod that went thru re-build into a Typo 2 Italian 7.62 conversion?

Some folks actually weld up the half moon cut and remachine the area to make it "right" and get a lot more money.
Gotta wonder how many people mark the the part or the gun as "corrected 2009 " ?

tankerman
10-13-2009, 7:44 PM
Yes he does.
I think you're the one "not understanding" You're not understanding.

People take mixmasters and try and hunt down parts to make all of the parts period correct, hence the tern "correct grade". This means that the parts may not all be original but all of them are stamped with what they should be. People who buy correct grade Garands understand (or they should) that the parts probably aren't original.

Then we have "original rifles" that are as issued as is and all of the parts are matching. Guns represented as original should never have parts swapped out. Selling a gun that has been forced correct and passing it off as original is morally wrong and dishonest.

Yes, people do pay more for "correct rifles", people also pay more, a lot more, for original rifles.

As a reference I would say roughly a WW2 dated Garand breaks down as follows:

Mixmaster : 600-800
Correct: 900-1000
Original 1800-2200

There are a lot of variables that go into value like date of manufacture, condition, and market value but I think you get the picture.

thefifthspeed
10-14-2009, 12:08 AM
Yes he does.
I think you're the one "not understanding"

Care to explain why?

Dr. Peter Venkman
10-14-2009, 12:13 AM
I've read that there is no such thing as a "correct" Garand if it has been re-arsenaled. They were not put together in the same manner that the Germans did their K98s, with serial numbers from specific factories down to specific screws.

thefifthspeed
10-14-2009, 9:24 AM
I've read that there is no such thing as a "correct" Garand if it has been re-arsenaled. They were not put together in the same manner that the Germans did their K98s, with serial numbers from specific factories down to specific screws.

"Correct" is just a term people have used to refer to a Garand that has all of the parts correct for the serial range. You are correct, the American's did not individually mark their rifles and subsequent parts with serial numbers like the Germans did the K98 or other guns like the Luger. Instead they pulled parts from large batches and each of the parts had "drawing numbers" and every so often the batches would change.

http://battlerifle0.tripod.com/id3.html

Just so I'm not sounding crazy with the whole "correct" term here are so links showing what I mean. Check out the CMP, the authority in Garands:

http://www.thecmp.org/m1garand.htm
Correct grades are sold out but the listing is near the bottom.

Some people on GB selling "corrects":
http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/ViewItem.asp?Item=143168667
http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/ViewItem.asp?Item=142986401
http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/ViewItem.asp?Item=142979434

And here is an supposed original (notice the huge jump in price)
http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/ViewItem.asp?Item=143104004

Actually , I do understand.


"... people do pay more for " correct rifles ... "

Some do , some don't.
I don't and won't. YMMV. I make no claim to moral purity.



This is the part I was trying it address:


No knowledgable buyer will pay more more than the sum of parts for a " humped " rifle .
The only way to make money humping historic guns is to misrepresent -- actively or passively -- what the gun really is.
FWIW and YMMV.

People do pay more for “correct rifles” and people can and do make more money without misrepresenting what the gun really is.



Some folks actually weld up the half moon cut and remachine the area to make it "right" and get a lot more money.
Gotta wonder how many people mark the the part or the gun as "corrected 2009 " ?

This is a whole ‘nother topic. Altering a part as such and trying to pass it off as an original piece is dishonest and wrong. It would be the same of those lowlifes that stamp new cartouches on stocks and try to pass them off as originals (I’ve seen these stocks sell for $500-600 when they aren’t worth $50)

If at this point we aren’t on the same page I guess we will have to agree to disagree.

campperrykid
10-14-2009, 1:02 PM
Sweet muzzle

.:79: