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View Full Version : Newbie Question - Glock 19 Accuracy


Harpo
10-04-2009, 7:20 PM
Spent my first session at the range with my new Glock 19. I put about 120 rounds through it. I did notice something interesting - it is probably me but thought I would ask. My first 100 rounds were 115g WWB. Since I am a new shooter, I was all over my target (torso target at 9 yards). My spread was about 10" (pretty poor I know).

I then switched for the final 20 rounds to 124g Gold Dot JHP. I wanted to see how they would cycle through my gun. My accuracy dramatically improved! The spread on a clean target was only about 4"-5" inches for all 20 rounds.

Would this normally be expected between 115g and 124g at 9 yards? Again - I a new so it maybe the shooter here. Maybe I just improved on the last 20 rounds?

Thanks

Stormfeather
10-04-2009, 7:25 PM
Accuracy is the person pulling the trigger. The gun will continually hit the basic same place at 9 yards if you aim at the same spot, and apply the same basics rules of marksmanship each and every time.

jdogg2000
10-04-2009, 7:33 PM
Maybe you were improving after the first batch of rounds. Although some ammo is more accurate (more consistent really) than others, there's no way the ammo made that much of a difference in your groups. Keep practicing! I'm sure you've heard, but the key is pretending like the gun has no recoil. If you anticipate the kick at all, you'll throw off your aim. Have fun!

Greg-Dawg
10-04-2009, 7:35 PM
Take a class.

Harpo
10-04-2009, 7:36 PM
Maybe you were improving after the first batch of rounds. Although some ammo is more accurate (more consistent really) than others, there's no way the ammo made that much of a difference in your groups. Keep practicing! I'm sure you've heard, but the key is pretending like the gun has no recoil. If you anticipate the kick at all, you'll throw off your aim. Have fun!

Thanks for the advice. Looking forward to another session at the range and working on my accuracy.

CalNRA
10-04-2009, 7:44 PM
the Glock 19 should be making 1/2-1 inch groups at 9 yards.

Dryfire the pistol at the range *a lot*(it won't hurt the Glock) and see what's happening to your grip as you pull the trugger

Good luck.

THT
10-04-2009, 8:46 PM
the Glock 19 should be making 1/2-1 inch groups at 9 yards.

Dryfire the pistol at the range *a lot*(it won't hurt the Glock) and see what's happening to your grip as you pull the trugger

Good luck.

A drill I like is to randomly mix snap caps in with live ammo. You can tell if you're flinching and you also practice dealing with a FTF.

Turbinator
10-04-2009, 9:38 PM
A drill I like is to randomly mix snap caps in with live ammo. You can tell if you're flinching and you also practice dealing with a FTF.

Great trick - works better if a buddy loads the mags for you so that you don't know what is what.

Turby

Clayface
10-04-2009, 10:04 PM
Sounds like a question that is based solely on your state of mind.When you shot those last 20 rounds you made yourself believe they were better or superior to what you had shot . Kind of like when they are testing a new prescription and patients are given a sugar pill and let to believe they are receiving the actual medication and they report feeling better. Its all on what you believed when you shot it.

Dr. Peter Venkman
10-04-2009, 10:34 PM
Shoot correctly more often.

CrippledPidgeon
10-05-2009, 7:49 AM
Take a class.

+1. Better to take a class with a GOOD instructor and see a leap in improvement than waste the money on throwing away good ammo. One of the things that a good instructor will be able to teach you is not only what to do to get better, but also how to properly diagnose yourself. That's something that otherwise can take a long time to learn on your own.