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Gunaria
10-04-2009, 7:03 PM
I just picked up this sporterized Arisaka. It was labled as a Type 38 but I have the feeling it is a Type 99. It still has the mum and a serial number in the 24,000 range. Also it has the anti-aircraft rear sight, the two piece buttstock and a matching numbered bolt that bubba cut, bent and welded back on (how I can tell, I see some weld slag on it). The bore is still in good shape. The lands look a bit used but not pitted like an LA sewer pipe.

Let me know what you guys think it is.

http://i36.tinypic.com/1531oap.jpg

http://i35.tinypic.com/29fujw6.jpg

http://i34.tinypic.com/34zak4y.jpg

Cali-V
10-04-2009, 7:38 PM
When in doubt I always go here (http://www.radix.net/%7Ebbrown/japanese_markings.html)

Spiggy
10-04-2009, 7:39 PM
Type 99

coop44
10-04-2009, 7:47 PM
pretty cool, arisakas are getting harder to come by. It doesn't look too badly bubba-ized.

Gunaria
10-04-2009, 8:19 PM
When in doubt I always go here (http://www.radix.net/%7Ebbrown/japanese_markings.html)

Thanks.

By checking that site, I am able to tell that it is a Series 24 from the Kokura Arsenal.

Sampachi
10-06-2009, 3:20 PM
Does the bolt/safety match? Some of the late rifles have that rough welded safety that you mentioned.

knucklehead0202
10-06-2009, 10:01 PM
always look at the holes, the vent holes. type 38s have 2, 99s have one. and the vertical/horizontal writing is a dead giveaway too. also, the bolt release is shaped slightly different on 38 vs 99 and the mag floorplate release as well. the 38 has the one you push forward inside the trigger guard, whereas the 99 you pull backward. and the AA sights were never on the type 38s as far as i know.

Gunaria
10-06-2009, 10:23 PM
Sorry I haven't gotten around to take any more pics of it yet. From what I have been told and can tell, the last ditch 99's didn't have the AA rear sights but yet they had a butt pad that was nailed on like this one has. Plus the recoil lug on this stock may indicate a last ditch. The marking on the receiver say it is a Series 24 from the Kokura Arsenal which may have been a transitional period.

mls343
10-07-2009, 3:44 AM
In my experience, the last ditch rifles had all the accessories taken off - monopod, aircraft sights, dust covers, etc. Metal was hard to come by later in the war as was the abilty to make them. In addition, most of the sights went from a standard v to a peep.

From the picture, this looks like early to mid war. I have not checked out the referenced web page, but this is my take.

Have fun!

Gunaria
10-07-2009, 3:45 PM
Added some more pics in my first post.

tow4dough
10-07-2009, 9:59 PM
i've got an arisaka of some type which i will try to identify when i find somewhere that has bolts for them. it's missing the bolt. otherwise has everything else(no bayonet though) intact mum, monopod, two-piece buttstock- it looks like a battlefield pick-up
anyone know where to find a bolt for those suckas??
(sorry if i'm thread-jacking)

Milsurp Collector
10-09-2009, 5:34 PM
i've got an arisaka of some type which i will try to identify when i find somewhere that has bolts for them. it's missing the bolt. otherwise has everything else(no bayonet though) intact mum, monopod, two-piece buttstock- it looks like a battlefield pick-up
anyone know where to find a bolt for those suckas??
(sorry if i'm thread-jacking)

http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/SearchResults.asp?SearchType=0&Keywords=arisaka+99+bolt+%2Dld&Sort=1

If you can, find one that matches the last three numbers of your rifle's serial number.

tow4dough
10-09-2009, 7:09 PM
milsurp coll
cool site!! thanks so much
greg

TregoMark
10-10-2009, 9:06 PM
According to the book The Japanese Type 99 Arisaka Rifle by Doss White & Don Voight (probably the best reference out there right now) the stock is not correct for a series 24 Kokura. The series 24 still had the early parts. It was not until Kokura's 25th series that the transitional parts came into use. The series 24 was produced around 1944.

Springfield45
10-11-2009, 3:09 PM
"Last ditch" Type 99s (opposed to the earlier well built Type 99s) very greatly from the start of their production to the end of the war. The large recoil lug on the stock is a last ditch feature, so is a wood butt pad. However the sites are not crude like on most late war rifles. It could be that it is not the original stock. Or it could be one of the first of the "last ditch" rifles made before production really got bad.

You can find new made stocks for type 99s and that one would make a good restoration project. Numrich has a few parts for these.

ojisan
10-11-2009, 3:16 PM
http://www.radix.net/~bbrown/japanese_markings.html (http://www.radix.net/%7Ebbrown/japanese_markings.html)

;)

You need a bubba safety lever added:
http://i306.photobucket.com/albums/nn249/ojisan420/P8300070.jpg

And a bubba bone butt plate and grip cap:
http://i306.photobucket.com/albums/nn249/ojisan420/P8300071.jpg

Yeah, it's a 99, but this one was reworked and cut-down, rechambered in 30-06 and used in Korea right after WW2 ended. Then somehow it made it's way to the USA... if guns could talk....
http://i306.photobucket.com/albums/nn249/ojisan420/P8300069.jpg

Spiggy
10-11-2009, 3:21 PM
According to the book The Japanese Type 99 Arisaka Rifle by Doss White & Don Voight (probably the best reference out there right now) the stock is not correct for a series 24 Kokura. The series 24 still had the early parts. It was not until Kokura's 25th series that the transitional parts came into use. The series 24 was produced around 1944.

The last ditch series may include several previously manufactured or even formerly deemed unserviceable receivers to be rearsenaled to minimal specifications. It may not be the way was configured when it exited the factory the first time, but rather the second time around.

TregoMark
10-11-2009, 4:23 PM
The last ditch series may include several previously manufactured or even formerly deemed unserviceable receivers to be rearsenaled to minimal specifications. It may not be the way was configured when it exited the factory the first time, but rather the second time around.

That may very well be true. Not much has been written about Japanese repair programs. It seems that most rifles were shipped out from the factory and sent to various units in the Pacific. Any repairs done would have been at the local level.

It's unfortunate that the stock was carved on, but that was the fate of many Arisakas after the war. One of my Arisakas has a cut down stock. It's a transitional rifle and so finding just the right replacement stock and hardware has been difficult. It's otherwise a nice rifle, so I may just leave it alone.

TRICKSTER
10-11-2009, 5:37 PM
That thar is one o them rare Japanese moose guns, used in the Aleutian Island Campaign. It's said to have been sporterized by Japanese commander, Col. Yasuyo Yamazaki on Attu Island who hunted moose to feed his troops.:eek:

Gunaria
10-11-2009, 10:22 PM
That thar is one o them rare Japanese moose guns, used in the Aleutian Island Campaign. It's said to have been sporterized by Japanese commander, Col. Yasuyo Yamazaki on Attu Island who hunted moose to feed his troops.:eek:

Dude I just lol'ed my my shorts off.:D

Some buddies & I shot 5 rounds off in the wartime beast today and it worked perfectly. For a sporterized mil surp light weight rifle it shot like a .410 shotgun.

We may never know the full truth story on this rifle but it does not have any import marks so with a lower serial number in the 24 series maybe we can agree that this is some sort of transitional peroid to the last ditch rifles.:confused:

All I know is it is safe to fire and I will be offered this up for sale for under $100 FTF so let me know if you might be interested.

TRICKSTER
10-12-2009, 8:53 PM
Put it up on Gunbroker with this story prefaced with "I've been told" and it will will fit right in with a lot of the other listings. Starting price $500.