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Spotted Owl
03-17-2005, 12:08 PM
California law prevents one from transporting a loaded handgun without a CCW permit.

What happens if I go to the range with my revolver and it jams so that I can't unload it? Although this hasn't actually happened to me, It is a possibility. Assuming the range doesn't have an on-site gunsmith, how do I transport the gun home or to a gunsmith without breaking the law?

Spotted Owl
03-17-2005, 12:08 PM
California law prevents one from transporting a loaded handgun without a CCW permit.

What happens if I go to the range with my revolver and it jams so that I can't unload it? Although this hasn't actually happened to me, It is a possibility. Assuming the range doesn't have an on-site gunsmith, how do I transport the gun home or to a gunsmith without breaking the law?

bwiese
03-17-2005, 12:19 PM
Revolver? The best way out of that predicament would be to remove the cylinder/crane and keep that separate and then lock up the revolver's frame back into its case.

I always have a small screwdriver or two whenever I go shooting.


Bill Wiese
San Jose

Ted_Bell
03-17-2005, 12:57 PM
Why would you worry about such a situation? My experience is that cops are fairly reasonable people, and would judge the situation for what it is.

You could always carry a small battery powered arc welder with you so that you could render your guns permanently inoperable. I suspect that there are some on this board who do this "just in case". You never know when someone is going to shine a flashlight up your ***.

BigRich
03-17-2005, 1:19 PM
Really, I wouldn't worry about this. Ted is right. If you explain the situation to the LEO and even ask him for assistance with it, the cop might be a dept armorer and fix it for you free. If not, then remember his name and badge number because you have just notified law enforcement and are presumably taking it to a gunsmith for repair.

bwiese
03-17-2005, 2:09 PM
Ted's & BigRich's advice may be great for rural or sparser suburban areas. But metro areas can be quite different. I'd certainly separate the cylinder w/round from gun. We've already heard here of cops dishonoring legal CCW permits and hassling person for extended time...

But technical violations of the law are still violations. These are airtight simple possession laws and there's really no 'extenuating circumstances'.

Remember, AB98 is coming up, and if passed handgun transport restrictions/penalties will be at least a tad tighter.

A buddy and I had to deal with this situation a few months ago w/an older Glock 21 at a local indoor range near closing time. Somehow a partially chambered round was in there and the slide couldn't close fully or open. Range stayed open past closing time to let us get it squared away (they didn't know what to do) - my buddy didn't wanna take the gun home til clear (and he's prime candidate for cop stop w/biker tatoos, ponytail etc)

The number of metro cops here in Bay Area that really know guns - as opposed to gun lore - is fairly limited.


Bill Wiese
San Jose

Turbinator
03-17-2005, 4:45 PM
I actually locked up one of my guns pretty well with an out-of-spec round that I should have caught with a case gauge.. had to transport the gun home with a round stuck in the chamber. I figured that if I did get pulled over and inspected, I could demonstrate that the slide was pretty well locked up and that the firearm was truly non-functional.

Fortunately, I made it home ok and was able to get the stuck round out of there without a mishap.

Turby

Anonymous Coward
03-18-2005, 9:03 AM
Interesting problem.

What you could do (if the slide opens or can be pried open somewhat) thread a gunlock through the breech and the magazine well.

This way the gun is still loaded, but it cannot be fired. And this fact is externally visible.

It might not help with an overzealous DA, but in court you can prove that you took steps to render your gun unfirable.

Kruzr
03-18-2005, 11:39 AM
If the gun has a lock through it, I would think it would go a long way in showing that the gun was not in a "ready to fire" condition and wouldn't be considered a loaded gun in violation of the law. But stranger things have happened in the legal arena.