PDA

View Full Version : Assembling FAL Upper Half, Parts Needed?


rct442
09-25-2009, 8:00 AM
I'm seriously considering build a FAL Clone from new manufacture US parts. I plan to build the upper receiver with mostly new DSA parts, to get around 922(R) restrictions.

But first I need help to create a complete inventory of parts for the upper half.

Upper Receiver Parts List

1. DSA SA58 FAL Type 1 Receiver with no Carry Handle Cut - US Made Here (http://www.dsarms.com/SA58-FAL-Metric-Type-I-Receiver-308-Cal---0291CHC/productinfo/0291CHC/)
2. DSA Top Cover - US Made Here (http://www.dsarms.com/US-Made-Alloy-Top-Cover----US035A/productinfo/US035A/)
3. DSA Steel Cocking Handle - US Made Here (http://www.dsarms.com/US-made-steel-cocking-handle-assembly----US048/productinfo/US048/)
4. DSA Cocking Handle Lug Pin - US Made Here (http://www.dsarms.com/US-made-steel-cocking-handle-assembly----US048/productinfo/US048/)
5. DSA Cocking Handle Lug - US Made Here (http://www.dsarms.com/US-made-steel-cocking-handle-assembly----US048/productinfo/US048/)
6. DSA Bolt Hold Open Assembly - US Made Here (http://www.dsarms.com/Metric-Wide-Foot-Bolt-Hold-Open-Assembly-Complete-New---055/productinfo/055/)
7. DSA Magazine Release Lever - US Made Here (http://www.dsarms.com/US-Made-Israeli-Type-Mag-Release-Lever-Rounded-Edge---059A/productinfo/059A/)
8. DSA Magazine Release Pivot Screw - US Made Here (http://www.dsarms.com/Magazine-Release-Pivot-Screw-Also-for-Bolt-Hold-Open---054/productinfo/054/)
9. DSA Magazine Release Spring - US Made Here (http://www.dsarms.com/Magazine-Release-Spring---060/productinfo/060/)
10. DSA Locking Shoulder - US Made Here (http://www.dsarms.com/Locking-Shoulder-256---267/productinfo/030/)
11. Bolt Carrier Assembly - Foreign Made
12. Bolt - Foreign Made
13. DSA Firing Pin - US Made Here (http://www.dsarms.com/Metric-One-Piece-Firing-Pin---037A/productinfo/037A/)
14. DSA Firing Pin Spring - US Made Here (http://www.dsarms.com/Metric-Firing-Pin-Spring---038/productinfo/038/)
15. DSA Extractor - US Made Here (http://www.dsarms.com/Extractor-Two-Piece-Type-US-Made---040/productinfo/040/)
16. DSA Extractor Plunger - US Made Here (http://www.dsarms.com/FAL-Extractor-Plunger---041/productinfo/041/)
17. Extractor Spring - Foreign Made
18. DSA Gas Tube Nut - US Made Here (http://www.dsarms.com/Gas-Tube-Nut---018/productinfo/018/)
19. DSA SA58 FAL 21" Medium Complete Front End - US Made Here (http://www.dsarms.com/SA58-FAL-21-Medium-Complete-Front-End-308-Cal----001H21C/productinfo/001H21C/)
20. ???
21. ???

Am I missing anything? All parts Metric. I plan to send these parts to cgwgun.com for final assembly.

Sicarius
09-25-2009, 8:58 AM
Idealy what you need is a barrel vice that will bolt or c-clamp to your work bench. A receiver wrench. Timing tools for barrel allignment. Go and No-Go gauges and locking sholder pins of assorted sizes(some have used drill bits and a good mic but I wouldn't recommend it). With that said, people have been able to get away without useing a barrel vice and lock the receiver wrench in a sturdy vice and use a open end wrench on the lugs of the barrel. You may also need access to a machine shop to turn down the barrel if there is too much meat on the barrel shoulder where it meets the receiver to get it timed correctly. For me the timeing tools were a 3ft level, piece of rod that I threaded into the front sight post hole and a magnetic angle finder. I bought the gunplumber's dvd which is a tremendous help and a great resource with a few tricks of his own.
The jist of it is that you get the barrel to hand time to the 10 o'clock position to the receiver. Once I had achieved that, I put the barrel in the barrel vice and made sure that it was level. From there I threaded the receiver on and timed it getting it close by eyeball by using the rod in the front sight post and using the level across the top of the receiver to get it perpendicular. I also used the magnetic angle finder to double check everything. Once you have the barrel timed to the receiver, you headspace it by then sliding the bolt/carrier and used the different locking pins to see where you can get the right size to just close on the go gauge with the "two thumb" pressure... ya very scientific... You then check to make sure that it doesn't close on the no go gauge. Take that pin size and add .001(some say .002)and order the locking shoulder. Double check the locking shoulder when you get it! It is not uncommon to find that they are not as advertized and may need a couple drags of a file on them. Pop the locking shoulder into the receiver with a few wacks of a hammer and be careful to not hit the overhanging hear on the locking shoulder. Recheck with the go and no-go and you are set. I know it sounds like alot but it really isn't very bad. Just intimidating to read or look at.
Kevin

rct442
09-25-2009, 9:17 AM
Idealy what you need is a barrel vice that will bolt or c-clamp to your work bench. A receiver wrench. Timing tools for barrel allignment. Go and No-Go gauges and locking sholder pins of assorted sizes(some have used drill bits and a good mic but I wouldn't recommend it). With that said, people have been able to get away without useing a barrel vice and lock the receiver wrench in a sturdy vice and use a open end wrench on the lugs of the barrel. You may also need access to a machine shop to turn down the barrel if there is too much meat on the barrel shoulder where it meets the receiver to get it timed correctly. For me the timeing tools were a 3ft level, piece of rod that I threaded into the front sight post hole and a magnetic angle finder. I bought the gunplumber's dvd which is a tremendous help and a great resource with a few tricks of his own.
The jist of it is that you get the barrel to hand time to the 10 o'clock position to the receiver. Once I had achieved that, I put the barrel in the barrel vice and made sure that it was level. From there I threaded the receiver on and timed it getting it close by eyeball by using the rod in the front sight post and using the level across the top of the receiver to get it perpendicular. I also used the magnetic angle finder to double check everything. Once you have the barrel timed to the receiver, you headspace it by then sliding the bolt/carrier and used the different locking pins to see where you can get the right size to just close on the go gauge with the "two thumb" pressure... ya very scientific... You then check to make sure that it doesn't close on the no go gauge. Take that pin size and add .001(some say .002)and order the locking shoulder. Double check the locking shoulder when you get it! It is not uncommon to find that they are not as advertized and may need a couple drags of a file on them. Pop the locking shoulder into the receiver with a few wacks of a hammer and be careful to not hit the overhanging hear on the locking shoulder. Recheck with the go and no-go and you are set. I know it sounds like alot but it really isn't very bad. Just intimidating to read or look at.
Kevin

Thanks, but I was going to have the guys @ cgwguns.com do the build. It's only $125 and that includes assembly, head-spacing and test firing. If I had the time and interest I would assemble it myself, but I don't want to leave anything to chance.

If you look at my parts list, and you see anything I'm missing, let me know.

Sicarius
09-25-2009, 9:18 AM
OOOoooh sorry didn't read the last sentence that you were having it sent off to be built. Nevermind my tangent then. hehe. The only thing the shop really needs to get your receiver barreled and headspaced is the barrel, receiver, bolt and carrier. 922 isn't that hard to achieve in the fal. For you, you are using a us barrel, receiver, cocking handle, furniture and that is already 5 of the 7 parts. Gas piston, mag(3 potential parts), any number of trigger/hammer/sear and I believe the bolt and carrier also count... 922 won't be a problem for you. I can't think of anything else to add to your list. Looks good!
Kevin

fal_762x51
09-25-2009, 10:31 AM
Auto wrench (forgot the size, but opened up a millimeter), oak block and bench vise, no-go/go gauge, calipers and cheap drill bits you can grind down. It's not that hard. :D

Also, there is no such thing as an "upper receiver" for the FN-FAL, it's the receiver and the other is the trigger housing/pack.

Manic Moran
09-25-2009, 11:25 AM
Here are all my parts before I built my rifle.

If you see something in the picture which you don't have, you're missing something. (And yes, I used all the components)

http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/attachment.php?attachmentid=33928&stc=1&d=1253906623

The difficult bit is the locking shoulder, which comes in various sizes to get the correct headspace. Determining which shoulder size to get requires test fittings with gauges after the barrel is mounted and the breech block and slide are built and inserted.

Also, there is no such thing as an "upper receiver" for the FN-FAL, it's the receiver and the other is the trigger housing/pack

Depends on where you learned FAL-speak. In the Army, it was taught to me as 'upper body' and 'lower body'. (You'll note I don't say 'bolt', either)

NTM

wash
09-25-2009, 11:40 AM
You can call me un-American but I don't see the point in trying to make a U.S. FAL.

In many cases the foreign parts are superior.

Unless you just want to put money in to DSA's pockets, go for the receiver and 922(r) compliance parts and use a good imported parts kit for the rest.

Sicarius
09-25-2009, 1:12 PM
The Steyr STG kits are mighty fine. You can find a matching parts kit in the area of 450. Get your DSA receiver and you should be set. Mine is an imbel on imbel with 922 parts and it came out to be about 1k out the door with a 200 dollar receiver I bought 10 years ago. I did opt for a bunch of extras options but www.gunpartsguy.com makes some extremely nice parts kits.
Kevin

wash
09-25-2009, 2:14 PM
My next Imbel on Imbel (I've got the parts, need to build) will have a $250 receiver, a $140 parts kit, American made wood furniture and a few other 922(r) parts for a grand total of about $600 in parts and perhaps another $100 to parkerize a few parts.

But I bought everything a few years ago.

rct442
09-25-2009, 2:26 PM
What's the usual suspects for foreign made parts? What I mean is, what parts are difficult to find made in the US and therefore not 922(R) compliant?

Likewise, what are good parts to get that are US made or meet 922(R) compliance?

So far I plan to buy these 922(r) parts:
Handguard
Magazine body
Magazine follower
Magazine floorplate
Pistol grip
Receiver
Barrel
Belgian short flash hider
Cocking handle
Trigger Housing

Non-Complaint Parts:
Bolt
Bolt carrier
Buttstock

What's a good place to buy 922(R) complaint bolts and bolt carriers?

wash
09-25-2009, 2:49 PM
Unless you can find parts from a trials rifle, there are no US bolts.

You might be able to find a Tapco Israeli style carrier. DSA and Falcon make para carriers last I checked.

The best U.S. parts to use are the ones that won't break or are better than their foreign counterpart.

I like PG, hand guards and stock, that's three parts, hard to break.

DSA receivers are nice, that's a good part.

Magazine floor plates are nice, really cheap. Some people like to use followers, mine work fine and they are cheap but some people have problems with the BHO.

DSA has been advertizing USA magazines, evidently with USA tubes. I've never tried one, never tired to buy one, it might be vapor-ware but if not and they work, it's an easy part for a fixed magazine rifle.

Charging handles are good. They don't break very often and they are not terribly expensive.

Lower receivers are good. A couple companies make nice aluminum lowers and they are tough to break, save a little weight too, but quite expensive for one part...

Hammer, trigger and sear are a tough call. The imported stuff is cheap and it works, U.S. made stuff is expensive and might not.

Gas pistons, I don't trust them. Imports are dirt cheap and reliable. U.S. made have had issues and they are expensive. It's an essential part of the system, I would go foreign.

Barrels, probably a good place to spend money. The only possible serious problem is if it doesn't time right. The U.S. barrels are new and should provide good accuracy, the price isn't that much more than a new import (I think Sarco still has new Argentine barrels).