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luckystrike
09-11-2009, 12:38 AM
last weekend I was at Bassproshop/outdoor world (rancho) and saw what I thought was a good deal on a brandnew blackpowder pistol(old revolver type). so my question is: do you have to be 21 to buy one? is the 10 wait still applicable to the pistol? any pointers and clean up for when i pick one up?

thanks
-Mike

singleshotman
09-11-2009, 6:03 AM
If it's percussion or a flinklock you do not have to be 18 or 21, just buy it like you were buying dinner.All you need is cash. No wait period, buy it walk home with it.This was the only good thing that was done with the Assult weapons bill, an admentment made CA law the same as Federal. Before that you had a 10 day wait for any kind of pistol, DROS, etc.Heck you can now buy pre-1898 Colt Single Actions and have them shipped to your door.All it takes in that case is a big credit card. I bought an 1891 Merwin Hulbert Revolver in 44-40 last year, shipped by mail straight to my home.

M1A Rifleman
09-11-2009, 7:40 AM
Check out the prices for them in Cabela's as they were the best you could find on BP revolvers several years ago. The quality of them is pretty decent.

luckystrike
09-11-2009, 8:15 AM
If it's percussion or a flinklock you do not have to be 18 or 21, just buy it like you were buying dinner.All you need is cash. No wait period, buy it walk home with it.This was the only good thing that was done with the Assult weapons bill, an admentment made CA law the same as Federal. Before that you had a 10 day wait for any kind of pistol, DROS, etc.Heck you can now buy pre-1898 Colt Single Actions and have them shipped to your door.All it takes in that case is a big credit card. I bought an 1891 Merwin Hulbert Revolver in 44-40 last year, shipped by mail straight to my home.


awsome. thanks!

oh yeah i couldnt really find what i was looking for on Cabela's site

Quemtimebo
09-11-2009, 9:05 AM
Be sure to pay attention to the material that the revolver's frame is made out of. They are most often made either from brass or steel.

The brass framed guns are cheaper, but require you to use a lower powder charge; with hotter loads the brass frame will eventually stretch and create a dangerous situation. That's not to say that the brass guns are unsafe. They are just suited to a slightly different purpose than the steel ones. Steel framed guns also have the advantage of being able to fire modern cartridges (note: NOT modern +P loads) with the use of a conversion cylinder, just like they did back in the 1870's.

Cleanup of either kind of gun is very easy, but note that it must be done as SOON as you get home from shooting. Black Powder contains salts which will suck moisture right out of the air and rust your pretty new piece in hours. Just remove the grips, do a basic field strip and hit the thing with hot water.

At this point, some people put their guns in the oven on low for a short amount of time. Others just make sure that the gun is bone-dry after washing. Then run some BreakFree CLP or Ballistol down the bore and give the gun a good coat.

Easy peasy.

Argonaut
09-11-2009, 9:25 AM
For Quality look at a Ruger old army.......Pedersoli is about the best one made in Europe. They are imported with various trade names IE Cabelas.........

Quemtimebo
09-11-2009, 9:31 AM
For Quality look at a Ruger old army.......Pedersoli is about the best one made in Europe. They are imported with various trade names IE Cabelas.........

I second that. The Ruger Old Army is the BEST cap&ball revolver money can buy. You can use some pretty strong charges in that frame, too. Good quality stuff.

Pedersoli is pretty awesome too. The other Italian makers whose guns you'll most often are Pietta and Uberti. Both sell their guns to various importers here in the states (Pietta: Traditions Uberti: Cimarron). The quality of both makers is about the same, but the Ubertis tend to have a nicer fit and finish. I have a Cimarron branded Uberti 1858 Remington and I wouldn't trade it for the world.

gun toting monkeyboy
09-11-2009, 9:32 AM
Be sure to pay attention to the material that the revolver's frame is made out of. They are most often made either from brass or steel.

The brass framed guns are cheaper, but require you to use a lower powder charge; with hotter loads the brass frame will eventually stretch and create a dangerous situation. That's not to say that the brass guns are unsafe. They are just suited to a slightly different purpose than the steel ones. Steel framed guns also have the advantage of being able to fire modern cartridges (note: NOT modern +P loads) with the use of a conversion cylinder, just like they did back in the 1870's.

Cleanup of either kind of gun is very easy, but note that it must be done as SOON as you get home from shooting. Black Powder contains salts which will suck moisture right out of the air and rust your pretty new piece in hours. Just remove the grips, do a basic field strip and hit the thing with hot water.

At this point, some people put their guns in the oven on low for a short amount of time. Others just make sure that the gun is bone-dry after washing. Then run some BreakFree CLP or Ballistol down the bore and give the gun a good coat.

Easy peasy.

He pretty much covered it all. That is all good advice. You also might want to look at a BP pistol starter kit from Cabela's or where ever you end up getting your gun from. They are usually cheaper than buying all of the accessories separately. Just make sure it is in the correct caliber for your revolver.

-Mb

sigfan91
09-11-2009, 11:33 AM
Check Midwayusa for black powder stuff. I think a replica 1858 Remington Army with steel frame was $280.

11Z50
09-11-2009, 3:26 PM
I have recently been on a BP revolver and rifle kick and just scored a genuine Colt .36. They are lots of fun, and I enjoy the idea of buying a gun with no BS and even getting it in the mail! Ivananimal sold me a Ruger Old Army (Thanks Ivan!:)) and I've been into it ever since.

I have 5 pistols and three rifles now, and I'm having a great time. I'm thinking a shotgun is next, or maybe even a Howdah pistol.

I think it is a good idea for a young shooter to start out with BP since it helps you learn the mechanics of firearms, and it is relatively inexpensive. Bass Pro is an excellent resource and they usually have a good stock of BP possibles.

Argonaut
09-11-2009, 3:40 PM
I LOVE my Thompson Centers......The newer stuff isn't as nice but still the best in long guns.......And if you could find a Patriot.......They are a work of art. Some of the Italian guns are scary.....The Lyman imports have a reputation for blowing up (Class action against them as I remember) and there are some other cheep guns to be ware of. I too love the originals and shoot an 1858 Remington a lot. The 1858 is a inherently stronger action (even in the reproductions) than the Colts. The Remington type has a one piece frame instead of being held together with a wedge. By the way......You can buy a conversion cylinder for many that enable you to shoot modern cartridge ammunition......Without going through a FFL

luckystrike
09-11-2009, 5:41 PM
WOW-thanks for all the info guys. I will deff keep in mind everything from this when buying. where can I get conversion cylenders?? .38 special im guessing. whats the legality on those? and yes the ones at basspro had was kinda like a starter kit, from what I remember it included a small bottle of powder and som slugs, maybe even patches and a special cleaner. I wasnt paying much attention then, but damn i want one now!

Argonaut
09-11-2009, 6:44 PM
Brownells has 1/2 a page of conversion kits. They are not cheep, come in 45 and 38, They are for specific guns (and manufacturers) so if you want to use one, get a gun that you can fit one to. I have not used Pyrodex (black powder substitute) since it first came out 30 odd years ago. The real Black powder is a lot better and can be mail ordered with little trouble. Pyrodex is lower on the power scale than FFG and it smells like Ammonia. Get a Buffalo Arms Catalog, They are great guys and have everything. Track of the Wolf is also a good company. Buffalo arms also has used guns. Black powder shooting is great fun and a little addictive. They are also VERY powerful. The Colt Walker 1847, was the most powerful revolver until the 44 mag was introduced in the 50's. You clean Black powder with warm soap and water.

luckystrike
09-12-2009, 1:39 AM
Brownells has 1/2 a page of conversion kits. They are not cheep, come in 45 and 38, They are for specific guns (and manufacturers) so if you want to use one, get a gun that you can fit one to. I have not used Pyrodex (black powder substitute) since it first came out 30 odd years ago. The real Black powder is a lot better and can be mail ordered with little trouble. Pyrodex is lower on the power scale than FFG and it smells like Ammonia. Get a Buffalo Arms Catalog, They are great guys and have everything. Track of the Wolf is also a good company. Buffalo arms also has used guns. Black powder shooting is great fun and a little addictive. They are also VERY powerful. The Colt Walker 1847, was the most powerful revolver until the 44 mag was introduced in the 50's. You clean Black powder with warm soap and water.

alright will do.
thanks

TheBlackPowderGuy
10-11-2009, 4:07 AM
the howdah would be my choice - the new .58 version, that is.

pedersoli does a really good job with fit and finish too and they're available at cabela for $599.

i know what i'm gonna ask santa for this xmas... ha!

~d~