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View Full Version : Telcos want to lower the definition of "broadband"


artherd
09-04-2009, 6:09 PM
http://www.techcrunch.com/2009/09/04/mg-explains-why-isps-want-to-lower-the-definition-of-broadband/

What’s the deal with Comcast, Verizon, and other ISPs petitioning the FCC to lower the definition of broadband? It’s all about money—broadband stimulus money—MG Siegler explains on G4’s Attack of the Show.

As the Obama administration looks to expand broadband access to rural and urban areas that are still under-served, the ISPs want to lower what constitutes broadband so that they can get some of the billions of dollars in stimulus money without shelling out as much to actually deliver the broadband access the stimulus package is designed to create.

Those phone and cable companies are tricky. Watch the video.

bohoki
09-04-2009, 6:44 PM
i got dsl and it has ben getting slower since the day i signed up

day one i did one off the speed tests and got 900k and the introductiory rate was $15 a month

today i did one and only got 650k

cablemodems are superfast but i have to choose dsl or mount a "hughes net" on my house and it is throttled back for my $19 monthly fee


i say minimum for broadband ought to be 2 meg down/ one meg up

how else am i going to watch those crying baby hand cam movies fullscreen

sfwdiy
09-04-2009, 7:47 PM
I read about this and it's bullsh*t. Japan and Korea are pushing 80+ Mbps. Comcast is trying to call 256Kbps up and down broadband.

And the telcos in this country wonder why they're getting a continuous middle finger from just about every one of their customers.

--B

Rekrab
09-04-2009, 8:56 PM
Yeah, unfortunately the big telcos own all the phone lines, so we don't have a choice in the matter. It's like they're all trying to see who can screw over their customers the worst.

GrinderCB
09-04-2009, 9:15 PM
That whole bit a few years back about how you were supposed to be able to have a choice of your wireline carrier never really happened. Those who owned the lines were supposed to be required to sell/lease access to other providers in the interest of generating competition and all that. That being said I have little choice for high-speed except AT&T U*Verse since AT*T is our local wireline carrier. I'm actually very happy, testing just now (ironically using http://infospeed.verizon.net) and getting 5.358 Mbps. If I'm ever able to get Verizon I would plan on signing up for their FIOS service, but I'll just have to wait.

POLICESTATE
09-04-2009, 9:23 PM
I can't get Comcast where I live, only AT&T DSL, with a max speed of 2mpbs and only 400k upload, so when I have to remote into work and work at night it's soooo slow. I need more speed not less.

odysseus
09-04-2009, 9:28 PM
Absolutely no stimulus money for an infrastructure that is very much sub par to standards well in place. However we know this is just part of the negotiating strategy to form policy. Shows us what kind of oligarchy we currently have nationwide for telco infrastructure.

mquejr
09-04-2009, 10:27 PM
i think u.s. is ranked around 15th in the world as far as speed...

den888
09-05-2009, 8:56 AM
Visited S. Korea in January for work. 100 mbps access is about $30 US dollars a month for residential service.


I read about this and it's bullsh*t. Japan and Korea are pushing 80+ Mbps. Comcast is trying to call 256Kbps up and down broadband.

And the telcos in this country wonder why they're getting a continuous middle finger from just about every one of their customers.

--B

SAN compnerd
09-05-2009, 12:32 PM
Telco lobbyists have had a very cozy relationship with the FCC for years now and as telco's get into the cable market their influence continues to expand. Verizon successfully lobbied with many states to change the cable franchise laws from local/township/city level to statewide under the promise of lower prices and greater competition and only now after several years are states beginning to realise that this simply allows them to cherry pick deployments to areas where they will get the best return with no consumer oversite. Now a group called ConnectedNation which is just a front group for the telco's is getting stimulus funds to help certain states work on mapping broadband penetration. The telco's dont want accurate data about where broadband is available as it would force them to compete and cut into profits. And of course the FCC is not doing any consumer protection or advocation, they just give the telco's what they want, mostly because the FCC staff is ex telco employees.

stormy_clothing
09-10-2009, 5:26 PM
I read about this and it's bullsh*t. Japan and Korea are pushing 80+ Mbps. Comcast is trying to call 256Kbps up and down broadband.

And the telcos in this country wonder why they're getting a continuous middle finger from just about every one of their customers.

--B

lol Spain is about to unleash 1GBps service this year for home use.

att would upgrade there speeds but the 126 billion they make in profit every year doesn't allow them too.....

rynando
09-10-2009, 10:49 PM
If you think you're getting ripped off go to a datacenter and see what 10Mbps costs there. Also, just because some nations have FastE (or better) service to the home doesn't mean users over there will see anything close to those rates. If you talk to people who live over in Japan (for example) you'll often hear that they're having a hard time getting 1Mbps out of those lines.

R

artherd
09-11-2009, 12:19 AM
You mean the backend does not keep up with the last mile? :)

locosway
09-19-2009, 7:27 PM
What's sad is the US is so far behind other developed countries when we're talking the internet, the very thing that was invented here!

Netherlands (or NZ) has a community fiber system in place. I'd love to see dark fiber run all over the place and then charge people a nominal fee to connect to it, maybe as part of your renting/leasing/home tax.

locosway
09-19-2009, 7:33 PM
If you think you're getting ripped off go to a datacenter and see what 10Mbps costs there. Also, just because some nations have FastE (or better) service to the home doesn't mean users over there will see anything close to those rates. If you talk to people who live over in Japan (for example) you'll often hear that they're having a hard time getting 1Mbps out of those lines.

R

Datacenter with a SLA is a far cry from broadband. We had a private colo inside of TimeWarner in Irvine. Inside their CO!

We had three GigE lines. This setup ran us $40k a month.

Anyway, at this price we are paying $13 a meg. Average DSL is 1.5Mbps with a price of $30 and NO SLA.

So, tell me again how expensive this is for the telco's and how consumers should be lucky?

FreedomIsNotFree
09-19-2009, 9:41 PM
The vast size of the US is the largest single factor why we don't currently have speeds such as Japan and S. Korea enjoy.

As to the video itself, this is what happens when the government starts handing out money. Not only does it cost the taxpayers, it clearly has encouraged the Telecoms to figure out ways to cash in. The fact that the end result is potentially slower "broadband" speeds is a direct result of the government.

Don't blame the Telecoms...blame the politicians that started this mess. Once again, the lack of real competition, ie capitalism, results in a constrained benefit.

artherd
09-20-2009, 7:54 PM
Anyway, at this price we are paying $13 a meg. Average DSL is 1.5Mbps with a price of $30 and NO SLA.

So, tell me again how expensive this is for the telco's and how consumers should be lucky?

There's a little thing called copper/fiber plant :)

locosway
09-20-2009, 10:20 PM
There's a little thing called copper/fiber plant :)

I'm unfamiliar with that term.

mindwip
09-21-2009, 1:52 PM
Remember our ISPs layed the ground work for the internet alone time ago. Its unfair to compare our speeds to other nations that started later. They are only laying fiber which means theres is newer and better.

Now weather ISPs have been doing enough to upgrade is another question. But we will always be behind the price you pay for being first.

locosway
09-21-2009, 2:21 PM
Remember our ISPs layed the ground work for the internet alone time ago. Its unfair to compare our speeds to other nations that started later. They are only laying fiber which means theres is newer and better.

Now weather ISPs have been doing enough to upgrade is another question. But we will always be behind the price you pay for being first.

Cable has long been laying fiber, and their speeds are now often much faster than DSL. The days when you'd get home at 5 and your cable internet would be dog slow is long gone.

I've always been a DSL fan because I always felt the technology was better. Now I feel cable is the better between the two. I just can't wait until Fiber To The Door is more common.

M198
09-24-2009, 1:57 AM
My Time Warner super internet + double juiced whatever package runs fast enough to stream hulu and netflix in HD (480p - it's not really HD). If only their servers could keep up. I download anywhere from 1 - 2 MG/sec on fast servers (Microsoft, steam, etc) and sometimes through bittorrent.

http://www.speedtest.net/result/573443381.png (http://www.speedtest.net)

Currently we rate 28th in broadband speed (http://speedtest.net/global.php). Sad isn't it?