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Crusader
08-28-2009, 7:25 PM
I bought a German Kar98k from another Calgunner the other day. Upon research of a couple of markings (including a WaffenAmt on the stock), I have found that the WaA code matches that of the receiver, in both manufacturer and year of make.

The number on the stock is most definitely re-stamped, but since the WaA matches the receiver, it is possible it is the original stock.


My question is how rare is it to find a Russian Capture 98k with a stock WaA matching the receiver?
I ask because I want to clean up the stock, oil with with BLO, etc. But if this is an exceptionally rare find, I won't touch it.

mosinnagantm9130
08-28-2009, 8:41 PM
I bought a German Kar98k from another

My question is how rare is it to find a Russian Capture 98k with a stock WaA matching the receiver?
I ask because I want to clean up the stock, oil with with BLO, etc. But if this is an exceptionally rare find, I won't touch it.

I wouldn't call it exceptionally rare, but it's not the most common occurance eitjer. My rc k98's stock isn't it's original to the rifle, but it does have the same WaA. It's kind of a tricky road. Would I touch the stock? No, but it is your rifle, you are free to do with it as you wish, and as I said it's not anything exceptionally rare. More uncommon.

eighteenninetytwo
08-28-2009, 9:16 PM
I bought a German Kar98k from another Calgunner the other day. Upon research of a couple of markings (including a WaffenAmt on the stock), I have found that the WaA code matches that of the receiver, in both manufacturer and year of make.

The number on the stock is most definitely re-stamped, but since the WaA matches the receiver, it is possible it is the original stock.


My question is how rare is it to find a Russian Capture 98k with a stock WaA matching the receiver?
I ask because I want to clean up the stock, oil with with BLO, etc. But if this is an exceptionally rare find, I won't touch it.

If you clean the stock properly there is no issue either way. Look at it this way, is a 1965 mustang MORE original because it's dir is original, or does the owner wash it? I'll assume youwent for answer B there and continue. When a rifle is in service the unit and company armorers are responsible for the smalla rms issued.they would give the extra coats of BLO which in turn cleans the wood upon application. So long story short do NOT sand it, just use 00000 wire wool with a 50/50 mix of turpentine nd boiled linseed oil. You are not changing the finish, just protecting it and doing as the armorer would do. In effect, you're washing that ' 65 mustang.

Crusader
08-28-2009, 9:21 PM
If you clean the stock properly there is no issue either way. Look at it this way, is a 1965 mustang MORE original because it's dir is original, or does the owner wash it? I'll assume youwent for answer B there and continue. When a rifle is in service the unit and company armorers are responsible for the smalla rms issued.they would give the extra coats of BLO which in turn cleans the wood upon application. So long story short do NOT sand it, just use 00000 wire wool with a 50/50 mix of turpentine nd boiled linseed oil. You are not changing the finish, just protecting it and doing as the armorer would do. In effect, you're washing that ' 65 mustang.

Well yeah, that's exactly the stance I take on cleaning rifles... it isn't altering them other than removing grime.

It's not like the shellac is original to the rifle anyways, I would actually be restoring it to the way the Germans produced them. On the other hand, some people can be mighty touchy about such things.

But ok, if it's not a rare thing to find on stocks, I won't worry about it. Gonna steel wool the hell outta that thing tomorrow.

Dr. Peter Venkman
08-29-2009, 5:56 AM
But ok, if it's not a rare thing to find on stocks, I won't worry about it. Gonna steel wool the hell outta that thing tomorrow.

It is not very common to find proof markings on stocks, partly because people keep sanding and steel wooling them off. I'd leave it alone. BLO is not a magical elixir that is going to make it look better.

timdps
08-29-2009, 8:59 AM
Check the barrel channel for the stock serial number. If it matches the receiver serial, its the original stock. The number stamped on the left butt is a Russian addition, not a German number.

Probably more Wa135 rifle out there than any other Wa, so the odds of finding a Wa135 stock on a Wa 135 receiver are not that bad.

Have never found a stock that matched the receiver but have found a few stocks with all of their original serialed metal.

tim


I bought a German Kar98k from another Calgunner the other day. Upon research of a couple of markings (including a WaffenAmt on the stock), I have found that the WaA code matches that of the receiver, in both manufacturer and year of make.

The number on the stock is most definitely re-stamped, but since the WaA matches the receiver, it is possible it is the original stock.


My question is how rare is it to find a Russian Capture 98k with a stock WaA matching the receiver?
I ask because I want to clean up the stock, oil with with BLO, etc. But if this is an exceptionally rare find, I won't touch it.

Fate
08-29-2009, 9:18 AM
Germans did not use boiled linseed oil. They used a mineral oil. (Available as Butcher Block oil at the hardware store).

If you're dead set on stripping the Russian Capture finish (part of the gun's history), at least use the correct type of oil on the stock. Original German K98 stocks look somewhat dry and dull. Nothing like semi-gloss, BLO coated USGI arms at all.

Dont trade one "incorrect" finish for another.

rogdigity
08-29-2009, 7:37 PM
my rifle was likely a capture and i wouldnt really doubt it. my stock is also very obviously a laminate. the stock has also had quite za few ugly dings in it so i sanded and refinished it. came out like **** and now i have it all sanded again and i am planning on refinishing it again. this time i worked out the dings and worked a little better at sanding it. im not looking for an ioriginal stock restoration here. i just wqnt the rifle to look very nice. i am keeping my eyes open for a solid stock and when i find that i will buy it and use it.

I am actually planning on floating the barrel on my 98 as well. i will probably do this tomorrow if i can wake up early enough. i chose to do all of this with this stock because it was very saturated with grease and oil and after a few rounds it would 'leak' on me when i fired it when it was heated up. also, i had planned on getting a solid wood stock for it eventually anyways. as far as floating the barrel, i just want to see if i can do it with reasonable effort and get enough show back out of it when i shoot it.


anyone ever float a barrel on a 98?

Dr. Peter Venkman
08-30-2009, 5:40 PM
anyone ever float a barrel on a 98?

I've never been a fan of clearing out extra wood from the barrel channel. I don't intend to use milsurps as target shooters, and when I am at the range I certainly don't pretend that they are.

rogdigity
08-30-2009, 7:59 PM
it wasnt intended to turn a milsurp into a sniper rifle or anything. all i was trying to do was see if i could do it effectivly

joelberg
11-11-2009, 6:16 AM
Have you considered buying another stock to play with and keeping the one on there now in its current condition?

emcon5
11-11-2009, 6:40 AM
For what it's worth, there is some info here, about halfway down: "PROPER BEDDING OF GERMAN CARBINE 98k (from official German Ordinance document)."

http://www.mausershooters.org/k98k/SC_tips2.html