PDA

View Full Version : What is a C.O.E and what exactly is it good for?


NorCalGuy
03-28-2005, 4:25 AM
Curious about the California C.O.E (Certificate of Eligibility)...I've heard various things and am hoping someone who has one and some experience can clear it all up.

1.) Some say it allows you to bypass the 10 day waiting period for modern guns.

2,) Some say it allows you to purchase more than one modern handgun per month.

3.) Some say that it is required in order to order C&R rifles (that in CA we need both the COE and C&R).

Can someone in the know address these points and perhaps ad what having a COE allows one to do? Specifics are good. Also, what does it cost to get one? There's a state fee, I believe a fed fee? and a live scan fee?

Thanks for sharing your expertise.

NorCalGuy
03-28-2005, 4:25 AM
Curious about the California C.O.E (Certificate of Eligibility)...I've heard various things and am hoping someone who has one and some experience can clear it all up.

1.) Some say it allows you to bypass the 10 day waiting period for modern guns.

2,) Some say it allows you to purchase more than one modern handgun per month.

3.) Some say that it is required in order to order C&R rifles (that in CA we need both the COE and C&R).

Can someone in the know address these points and perhaps ad what having a COE allows one to do? Specifics are good. Also, what does it cost to get one? There's a state fee, I believe a fed fee? and a live scan fee?

Thanks for sharing your expertise.

imported_EOD Guy
03-28-2005, 6:36 AM
1. It does not allow you to bypass the 10 day wait on modern firearms. It does allow you to bypass the 10 day wait for C&R firearms.

2. It does exempt you from the one handgun a month law for both modern and C&R handguns.

3. Obtaining a COE is optional for C&R FFL holders.

Here is a short explanation of the California C&R rules.

There is a lot of confusion around concerning the California regulations on C&R Firearms. The first thing to remember is that California, with few exceptions, requires all firearms transfers within the state to be processed through a dealer. There is no exception for C&R FFL holders. There is however, an exception to the dealer transfer requirement for C&R rifles and shotguns that are over 50 years old. [PC 12078(t)(2)] This exception is available to anyone legally able to possess firearms. California doesn’t care if you are licensed or not, that’s a Federal matter. The 50 year rifle and shotgun exception is the reason that C&R FFL holders in California can receive these types of firearms directly from an out of state supplier.

The California definition for a C&R firearm is exactly the same as that used by BATF in 27CFR. California references both Title 18 and 27 CFR for the definition. If the Feds say a firearm is C&R, so does the California DOJ.

There are a couple of exceptions to the firearms laws that are available to C&R FFL holders. If the licensee also holds a Certificate of Eligibility (COE) from the California DOJ, they are exempt from the 10-day waiting period when buying C&R firearms from a dealer. [PC 12078(t)(1)] The same C&R FFL holder with a COE is also exempt from the one handgun a month law for both C&R and modern handguns. [PC 12072(a)(9)(B)] You also would not need a handgun safety certificate when purchasing C&R handguns. [PC 12807(a)(6)]


Where the C&R FFL comes in handy is when the holder is out of the state. They may purchase any C&R firearm and bring it back to California. The exceptions of course include those “evil” “assault weapons” and magazines with a capacity greater than 10 rounds cannot be brought back. Any C&R handguns purchased must be registered with the California DOJ within 5 days and are reported on Form BCIA 4100A along with a $19.00 payment for each handgun. [PC 12072(f)(3)]

imported_Telpierion
03-28-2005, 8:05 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">1. It does not allow you to bypass the 10 day wait on modern firearms. It does allow you to bypass the 10 day wait for C&R firearms.

2. It does exempt you from the one handgun a month law for both modern and C&R handguns. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Just to clarify, you also must have a C&R FFL to get these benefits. In addition to the above a COE is a requirement for certain jobs that involve firearms

Nylo
03-28-2005, 11:47 AM
This would be a good Sticky post.

doughboy334
04-11-2008, 7:12 PM
What are the requirements for a COE? I found the app (http://ag.ca.gov/firearms/forms/pdf/coeapp.pdf) on the ag.ca.gov but nothing else

doughboy334
04-11-2008, 7:16 PM
nvm, found it on the regulation page
(http://ag.ca.gov/firearms/regs/chapter3.pdf)

1. Applicant must be 18 years old.
2. Applicant must not be in a class of persons described in Penal Code Sections 12021, 12021.1, or Welfare and Institutions Code Sections 8100 or 8103, or Title 27, part 178.32 of the Code of Federal Regulations.

I miss anything?

wilit
04-12-2008, 8:09 AM
1. It does not allow you to bypass the 10 day wait on modern firearms. It does allow you to bypass the 10 day wait for C&R firearms with also a C&R license.

2. It does exempt you from the one handgun a month law for both modern and C&R handguns with also a C&R license.

3. Obtaining a COE is optional for C&R FFL holders.


There, fixed it for ya. ;)

timmy8151
04-12-2008, 8:22 AM
Here is the DOJ reply to my email regarding using a COE & C&R FFL as an exemption to the 1 a month rule:

Dear XXXX:

In response to your correspondence, the exemption provided to C&R holders with a Certificate of Eligibility to the "one in 30 day" is not restricted to C&R handgun purchases.

Sincerely,
Mr. Dana McKinnon
Field Representative
Bureau of Firearms
(916) 263-4881

Franksremote
04-12-2008, 8:39 AM
+1 nailed it on the head.

1. It does not allow you to bypass the 10 day wait on modern firearms. It does allow you to bypass the 10 day wait for C&R firearms.

2. It does exempt you from the one handgun a month law for both modern and C&R handguns.

3. Obtaining a COE is optional for C&R FFL holders.

Here is a short explanation of the California C&R rules.

There is a lot of confusion around concerning the California regulations on C&R Firearms. The first thing to remember is that California, with few exceptions, requires all firearms transfers within the state to be processed through a dealer. There is no exception for C&R FFL holders. There is however, an exception to the dealer transfer requirement for C&R rifles and shotguns that are over 50 years old. [PC 12078(t)(2)] This exception is available to anyone legally able to possess firearms. California doesn’t care if you are licensed or not, that’s a Federal matter. The 50 year rifle and shotgun exception is the reason that C&R FFL holders in California can receive these types of firearms directly from an out of state supplier.

The California definition for a C&R firearm is exactly the same as that used by BATF in 27CFR. California references both Title 18 and 27 CFR for the definition. If the Feds say a firearm is C&R, so does the California DOJ.

There are a couple of exceptions to the firearms laws that are available to C&R FFL holders. If the licensee also holds a Certificate of Eligibility (COE) from the California DOJ, they are exempt from the 10-day waiting period when buying C&R firearms from a dealer. [PC 12078(t)(1)] The same C&R FFL holder with a COE is also exempt from the one handgun a month law for both C&R and modern handguns. [PC 12072(a)(9)(B)] You also would not need a handgun safety certificate when purchasing C&R handguns. [PC 12807(a)(6)]


Where the C&R FFL comes in handy is when the holder is out of the state. They may purchase any C&R firearm and bring it back to California. The exceptions of course include those “evil” “assault weapons” and magazines with a capacity greater than 10 rounds cannot be brought back. Any C&R handguns purchased must be registered with the California DOJ within 5 days and are reported on Form BCIA 4100A along with a $19.00 payment for each handgun. [PC 12072(f)(3)]