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b.faust
08-15-2009, 10:25 AM
I have a friend who wants to learn how to shoot handguns.
No problem right? Stance, grip, sight alignment, sight picture, breathing, etc, etc.

Here's the rub. He does not have the use of his left hand. (Accident many many years ago)
I've taught a lot of folks the basics of shooting over the years, but I kind of feel like this one is a bit above me.

I figure, I'll just approach it as I was taught by TFTT for wounded one hand shooting drills.
Though I don't know how comfortable I am teaching him the ol reload and pull the slide back with one hand trick since he's never ever shot before.

Also, i'm starting him on a .22 buckmark.

Anyone have any ideas?
Thanks
B.

Greg-Dawg
08-15-2009, 10:30 AM
Have him sign up with a certified NRA instructor that qualifies teaching handicap students.

J-cat
08-15-2009, 10:37 AM
Tell him to stick his left arm behind him and shoot bullseye style.

b.faust
08-15-2009, 10:48 AM
Have him sign up with a certified NRA instructor that qualifies teaching handicap students.

I think that's a good call. This one is a little above my head.

His comfort level with me is pretty good though.
I'm thinking maybe just taking him for an hour or so, doing the reloads for him and letting him shoot the .22 to see if he likes it.
Or should I just send him directly to an NRA instructor?
I'm torn, I don't want him to feel like I'm brushing him off on someone else, but at the same time I don't want to teach him bad habits for disabled shooting.
Also, anyone who's a certified NRA instructor that's done handicapped training, if you could please PM me, that'd be great (Bay Area, San Rafael to be specific)

Thanks.
B.

Greg-Dawg
08-15-2009, 10:50 AM
Just be careful how you teach others. That's why most of those that taught me are certified instructors rather than neighbor Joe that has lots of guns.

...
Or should I just send him to a NRA instructor.

Also, anyone who's a certified NRA instructor that's done handicapped training, if you could please PM me, that'd be great (Bay Area, San Rafael to be specific)

Thanks.
B.

Call your local gun shop/range for reference. You're not brushing him off, you're just being honest and helpful.

b.faust
08-15-2009, 10:55 AM
Just be careful how you teach others. That's why most of those that taught me are certified instructors rather than neighbor Joe that has lots of guns.



Call your local gun shop/range for reference. You're not brushing him off, you're just being honest and helpful.

All very good advice. Thanks man.
B.

Greg-Dawg
08-15-2009, 11:02 AM
De nada dude.

I've seen too many bad shooting techniques at the range that guys end up passing it on to others (I'm not saying that you have them or anything, since we haven't shot together). But learning from a reliable source is valuable stuff.

AngelDecoys
08-15-2009, 11:22 AM
For semi-autos that do not "hold-open", release empty mag, place in holster or waistband, reload. after getting a good grip rack the slide to chamber round. The slide may be racked by sticking the sights on the slide on your waist belt, holster or other surfaces you find around in the environment. ....

One handed manipulations are good for everyone to practice. :)

The only thing I'd like to add is that if the firearm doesn't have steel sights, this might not be a good idea. Right smack in the middle of an advanced tactics course I was taking a few years ago, I broke off the sights doing one of those drills using the above method. May not happen to you, just a friendly warning.

b.faust
08-15-2009, 11:34 AM
Thanks everyone,

I've been taught (and practiced) all the single hand drills, but I'm not 100% comfortable teaching them to someone else since I'm not an instructor.

I'm going with the advice of Greg-Dawg on this, and differing to someone who is qualified to instruct.

B.

Greg-Dawg
08-15-2009, 11:39 AM
There's so much you can learn from the Internet, but one-on-one personal teaching is more effective. Good luck dude.

scout II
08-15-2009, 11:40 AM
I friend of mine had a stroke and was paralyzed on his right side.He wanted to get back into shooting but did not think he could shoot any of his semi auto pistols anylonger.We got him some snap caps and started on showing him how to load and unload different caliber pistols he had with different methods for doing such.He finally had enough confidence to go to the range.He did fine with his one arm/hand loading firing and unloading.Sometimes he did better than us.After that he was always bugging us to head out to the range with him.We had lots of fun.I forgot to say,he was a retired sheriff deputy,so he had lots of previous training.Sad to say that he passed away a few years ago.I still miss shooting with him:(

B Strong
08-15-2009, 12:26 PM
Have him sign up with a certified NRA instructor that qualifies teaching handicap students.
+1.

Instructing is an art, and instructing a handicapped individual is high art.

MarioS
08-15-2009, 10:38 PM
Hmm, that would be difficult. I'm not sure how he would load his cartridges into the magazines...but once they are loaded, I would just teach him one-handed manipulations as if the other hand were wounded. Put the pistol in between the legs at the knees, apply gentle pressure with the knees to hold it there, put a fresh mag in with one hand, pick the pistol up again and either release the slide using the rear sight on a belt or hit the slide release. That's the only way I see doing it.

BunnySlayer
08-16-2009, 11:19 AM
Pretty much any good tactical instructor could teach him the same techniques used for wounded/one hand only drills such as holstered reloads and one handed draws. I've even seen a few guys get it pretty fast with practice. Talk to a few first and they might be able to work out a specialized coarse for him.

hawk1
08-16-2009, 11:30 AM
I think that's a good call. This one is a little above my head.

His comfort level with me is pretty good though.
I'm thinking maybe just taking him for an hour or so, doing the reloads for him and letting him shoot the .22 to see if he likes it.
Or should I just send him directly to an NRA instructor?
I'm torn, I don't want him to feel like I'm brushing him off on someone else, but at the same time I don't want to teach him bad habits for disabled shooting.
Also, anyone who's a certified NRA instructor that's done handicapped training, if you could please PM me, that'd be great (Bay Area, San Rafael to be specific)

Thanks.
B.

Take the class with him. It would help him feel at ease and help you if you ever have to do one handed shooting. Win-win...

DVSmith
08-16-2009, 12:33 PM
Take the class with him. It would help him feel at ease and help you if you ever have to do one handed shooting. Win-win...

This is a great idea. Additionally you will be there to help him get through the class and that makes it a bit easier on him and the instructor.