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View Full Version : Help me diagnose my 1911....please.


Trendkill
08-13-2009, 7:29 PM
As some of you know...I aquired a Series 70 Colt Mk IV 1911 from my friend who passed away.

I recieved it on tuesday after the 10 day B.S. waiting period...and took it apart to clean. Before I disassembled it I was checkin it out a little , so I went ahead and let the slide rack forward from the locked back position. All was well....so I did it one more time and the hammer followed after it went into battery. The hammer didn't go all the way down of course...but it did drop into the half-cock position. It kept doing the same thing in different attempts.....bout 50% of the time.

So I figured I'd clean the hell out of it....and maybe that would help a little.

Nope.

Any ideas what the hell is causing this....????

SCMA-1
08-13-2009, 7:42 PM
Never drop a slide on an empty chamber. Although, some single action pistols are fairly tolerant of this practice, the 1911 is one of the least tolerant. You can end up damaging the sear/hammer engagement surfaces from the shock of the slide slamming closed without a round in the chamber to buffer it.

Try the same thing with a snap cap or dummy round and it shouldn't happen. If the hammer continues to drop to half cock, then the you will need a new hammer and sear.

SCMA-1

Sheldon
08-13-2009, 7:46 PM
That's why they don't recommend dropping the slide on an empty chamber. It is possiblle the engagement surfaces between the hammer and sear are damaged. You may need some work and or replacement parts to get the hammer to stop following the slide.

JTROKS
08-13-2009, 7:52 PM
Do not drop the slide on an empty chamber. Sounds like your 1911 may have had a trigger job. First make sure the gun is clear and unloaded with no mags. When you cock the hammer and pull the trigger does it have a light trigger pull? Maybe the person you got it from used it for bullseye shooting, with modern 1911 trigger jobs the problem you described doesn't happen until the hammer/sear/disconnector and spring requires attention. I'm wondering if the gun is set up for target loads or standard ball. I advice you to seek a professional gunsmith that deals with 1911s to provide you what your 1911 is set up for. For example, if your 1911 is set up to shoot very light target loads and you load it with some +P 45 ACP loads it may spell disaster. Again, do not drop the slide on an empty chamber.

ojisan
08-13-2009, 7:59 PM
Could also be the arm of the leaf spring is not putting enough tension on the sear, or there is lots of gunk still inside gumming up the works.
But if the slide has been dropped repeatedly, there very well may be parts damage.

roc
08-13-2009, 7:59 PM
i let a friend handle one of my 1911s a few months back and he racks it back and let it rip home with an empty chamber. my heart sunk as it all happened too fast for me to stop him. i was lucky that nothing bad happened to it but it is a big no no!

btw, SCMA-1, you know this guy :p i think your Garand is being treated a little better than my 1911 was.

Trendkill
08-13-2009, 8:01 PM
Yes....it is a light trigger.....and yes...I was a tard for droppin the slide on an empty chamber. Didnt know 1911's were sensitive.

I had planned on taking it to a "Smith" to have him check it over. I am a little iffy about such a light trigger...so I totally wont mind having the trigger brought back to what would be factory specs.

SCMA-1
08-13-2009, 8:03 PM
i let a friend handle one of my 1911s a few months back and he racks it back and let it rip home with an empty chamber. my heart sunk as it all happened too fast for me to stop him. i was lucky that nothing bad happened to it but it is a big no no!

btw, SCMA-1, you know this guy :p i think your Garand is being treated a little better than my 1911 was.

OOHHHH NOOOES!!!!!:eek: I know who you are talking about.;) Hope it's not damaged, dude.:(

J-cat
08-13-2009, 10:29 PM
Could also be the arm of the leaf spring is not putting enough tension on the sear, or there is lots of gunk still inside gumming up the works.
But if the slide has been dropped repeatedly, there very well may be parts damage.

+1

+1

and

+1

The SoCal Gunner
08-13-2009, 11:22 PM
Clean it and give it another try. Are you racking the slide all the way back or are you short stroking it?

dfletcher
08-13-2009, 11:32 PM
Could also be the arm of the leaf spring is not putting enough tension on the sear, or there is lots of gunk still inside gumming up the works.

But if the slide has been dropped repeatedly, there very well may be parts damage.

That's my vote and an easy fix. 1st finger on the left, correct? Since he can disassemble and reassemble the gun I'd say take it down, give it a good forward bend and try again.

brassburnz
08-14-2009, 1:24 AM
There's nothing wrong with your 1911. Sounds like your friend had a trigger job done to the gun. If it has a nice crisp trigger pull, don't mess with it. Don't drop the slide on an empty chamber. It ruins the engagement surfaces of the hammer and the sear.

You could probably add more pressure to the sear by adjusting the sear leaf on the sear spring. This will help prevent hammer follow. Most the bullseye shooters I know don't use the slide stop to drop the slide. They use their off hand and sling shot it. For some reason, it tends to be gentler on the gun.

bin31z
08-14-2009, 3:09 AM
There are two things that this could be.

1. You have a bad trigger job and the sear is slipping

2. Your disconnector is worn.

Try this. Pull the trigger and hold it. Pull the slide back all the way and lock it while holding the trigger. Drop the slide while holding the trigger. Holding the trigger binds up the sear so it won't be damaged when you drop the slide on an empty gun. Now, if your hammer fell when you dropped the slide, your disconnector is worn and its not the trigger job. You might also want to check the half moon that the disconnector goes up into. Sometimes that's enlarged to accomadate a new disconnector and it gets cut too big. So either its a worn disconnector or some crappy gunsmith ruined the slide. :( sorry for the bad news.

Trendkill
08-14-2009, 7:35 PM
There are two things that this could be.

1. You have a bad trigger job and the sear is slipping

2. Your disconnector is worn.

Try this. Pull the trigger and hold it. Pull the slide back all the way and lock it while holding the trigger. Drop the slide while holding the trigger. Holding the trigger binds up the sear so it won't be damaged when you drop the slide on an empty gun. Now, if your hammer fell when you dropped the slide, your disconnector is worn and its not the trigger job. You might also want to check the half moon that the disconnector goes up into. Sometimes that's enlarged to accomadate a new disconnector and it gets cut too big. So either its a worn disconnector or some crappy gunsmith ruined the slide. :( sorry for the bad news.

Hammer didnt fall....and I racked that thing like an S.O.B. , with the trigger pulled of course.

Trendkill
08-14-2009, 7:39 PM
I have another thread about this gun here. There are pictures of it too.

http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/showthread.php?t=208039

SCMA-1
08-14-2009, 7:45 PM
Put a little more arc in the sear spring; that should take care if it for awhile. If you start getting hammer follows when chambering a round, then it's time to have the sear/hammer engagement surfaces dressed or both of those parts replaced.

SCMA-1

aplinker
08-14-2009, 9:10 PM
Never drop a slide on an empty chamber. Although, some single action pistols are fairly tolerant of this practice, the 1911 is one of the least tolerant. You can end up damaging the sear/hammer engagement surfaces from the shock of the slide slamming closed without a round in the chamber to buffer it.

Try the same thing with a snap cap or dummy round and it shouldn't happen. If the hammer continues to drop to half cock, then the you will need a new hammer and sear.

SCMA-1

What? No. The sear and hammer are nowhere near what's happening. That's just silly. If you're trying to say the "shock" will do it, then that's even sillier. The violence of the ejection is far higher than closing of the slide.

You can damage the lugs, though. That's why you don't do it. The direct metal-metal contact.

SCMA-1
08-15-2009, 9:35 AM
What? No. The sear and hammer are nowhere near what's happening. That's just silly. If you're trying to say the "shock" will do it, then that's even sillier. The violence of the ejection is far higher than closing of the slide.

You can damage the lugs, though. That's why you don't do it. The direct metal-metal contact.

That's what I've been told for ages by everyone including every 1911 gunsmith I've talked to over 25 years. Perhaps I am misquoting what's happening or did I misunderstand what all have told me?:confused:

I'll check again with one of my buddy gunsmiths and get back.

SCMA-1

Edit: shock is transmitted throughout the gun so the parts in question do not have to be exactly where the impacting surfaces are located.

J-cat
08-15-2009, 10:19 AM
Edit: shock is transmitted throughout the gun so the parts in question do not have to be exactly where the impacting surfaces are located.

Think about what you are saying.

SCMA-1
08-15-2009, 10:33 AM
Think about what you are saying.

Talk to me. If I'm incorrect I would like to know why; no bloated egos here just a perpetual student.:)

J-cat
08-15-2009, 11:40 AM
I read your statement to mean that vibration will damage the innards even though they don't impact against themselves. That is an impossibility.

SCMA-1
08-15-2009, 3:35 PM
Just talked to my gunsmith buddy; he confirms what I and what a half dozen or so other people stated earlier in this thread. The shock imparted by the slide slamming closed on an empty chamber may induce the hammer to slip off the sear engagement face (this is particularly possible with sub 3lb 1911 trigger jobs) and fall to half cock. Repeated cycles may damage the engagement surfaces, especially when falling to the halfcock notch.

SCMA-1

ojisan
08-15-2009, 3:53 PM
Just talked to my gunsmith buddy; he confirms what I and what a half dozen or so other people stated earlier in this thread. The shock imparted by the slide slamming closed on an empty chamber may induce the hammer to slip off the sear engagement face (this is particularly possible with sub 3lb 1911 trigger jobs) and fall to half cock. Repeated cycles may damage the engagement surfaces, especially when falling to the halfcock notch.

SCMA-1

Correct.

Barrel lug damage can also occur, as the round being fed and chambered does slow and somewhat cushion the slides return to battery. No round being fed means a full speed impact to a instant stop.
After seeing the insides of lots of autoloader pistols, I don't drop slides into battery unless feeding rounds on any gun. No ammo? I ease it shut.
Perhaps I'm overly cautious or gentle, but I prefer not to have to replace or make new parts if it can be avoided, regardless of brand or design.

bsg
08-15-2009, 4:14 PM
although i am an old w german sig owner, don't "let her go" without a round chambered in any pistol. at this point i would have a pro look at your gun and get done what needs to be done....

BigRich
08-15-2009, 6:11 PM
It is possible for hammer hook/sear damage to occur. If in the course of the trigger job the half cock notch was not modified to have the side contact patches relieved (thus leaving a center "notch" only), then allowing the hammer to fall to half cock can cause damage to a very finely honed sear edge. If the hammer hooks are cut way down to get a very short release then the secondary angle on the sear is very short and leaves the sear edge exposed to damage. I have no doubt that adding some sear weight on the three leaf spring will fix this.

BTW Trendkill, if you do have the trigger set up returned to "factory spec" it will be horrible in comparison to the trigger you have now. It sounds like your friend had a Bullseye gun built and the trigger pull set very light for this kind of work. Treat the pistol with care and have some weight put back into the release. Enjoy the pistol. Stock 1911 triggers were gunsmithed for a good reason.

Back in the old days (1970s and 1980s) loading the chamber from a full magazine with the trigger held back was pretty common if the pull was very light. It is dangerous but think about it; you are pointing the gun in a safe direction and making it ready to fire. If it goes bang then you are sort of ready for it. Besides, guns are supposed be dangerous.

Trendkill
08-15-2009, 7:05 PM
It is possible for hammer hook/sear damage to occur. If in the course of the trigger job the half cock notch was not modified to have the side contact patches relieved (thus leaving a center "notch" only), then allowing the hammer to fall to half cock can cause damage to a very finely honed sear edge. If the hammer hooks are cut way down to get a very short release then the secondary angle on the sear is very short and leaves the sear edge exposed to damage. I have no doubt that adding some sear weight on the three leaf spring will fix this.

BTW Trendkill, if you do have the trigger set up returned to "factory spec" it will be horrible in comparison to the trigger you have now. It sounds like your friend had a Bullseye gun built and the trigger pull set very light for this kind of work. Treat the pistol with care and have some weight put back into the release. Enjoy the pistol. Stock 1911 triggers were gunsmithed for a good reason.

Back in the old days (1970s and 1980s) loading the chamber from a full magazine with the trigger held back was pretty common if the pull was very light. It is dangerous but think about it; you are pointing the gun in a safe direction and making it ready to fire. If it goes bang then you are sort of ready for it. Besides, guns are supposed be dangerous.


So....since the the hammer doesnt fall while I have the trigger pulled....do you think all is well..??

There is a bit of "Slop" in the trigger, maybe an 1/8th of an inch right before it has any pull weight. Then....it breaks with very little movement...and it is quite light. Im guessing like 3 to 3 1/2 lbs. I like the slop though....cuzz it helps you know when the tension will begin.

ojisan
08-15-2009, 7:22 PM
Yes, as long as when firing the hammer never follows the slide down.
I would not use this for a HD gun as the trigger is just too light IMHO.

bin31z
08-15-2009, 7:38 PM
Dropping the slide on an empty chamber will cause the sear and hammer engagement surface to bounce against eachother. When the gun is firing, this force is eased because the slide slows down considerably when it comes forwards and has to push a round into the chamber. If you have an older Gold Cup National Match, you'll notice that the sear has a tiny spring on it to prevent this kind of damage.

It is a well know fact that you are not supposed to drop the slide on an empty 1911 to avoid sear damage. Here's an article about it

http://www.sightm1911.com/lib/tech/drop_slide_empty.htm

bin31z
08-15-2009, 7:39 PM
also see this about holding the trigger while loading a round

http://www.sightm1911.com/lib/tech/hold_trigger.htm

bin31z
08-15-2009, 7:44 PM
So....since the the hammer doesnt fall while I have the trigger pulled....do you think all is well..??

There is a bit of "Slop" in the trigger, maybe an 1/8th of an inch right before it has any pull weight. Then....it breaks with very little movement...and it is quite light. Im guessing like 3 to 3 1/2 lbs. I like the slop though....cuzz it helps you know when the tension will begin.

that slop is just normal overtravel. they have triggers with screws that will take that "slop" away but its very unsafe for many reasons. I like to have a tiny bit of that slop just to make it harder to have an accidental discharge. Honestly, I think you just have a bad trigger job at this point. Where the sear is simply slipping off the hammer because the engagement is neutral or negative to eachother, meaning the spring tension is pushing the sear OFF the hammer instead of on a positive engagement when its pushing the hammer into the cocked position. This is a sight of an improper trigger job. But on the other hand, I had this same problem as you do once except at the range, my pistol was going full auto because the hammer was falling after each shot and hitting the firing pin. My gunsmith found out it was a problem with the grip safety. So sometimes its not what you expect and people on Calguns will not be able to diagnose your problem over the forum. I suggest just taking the gun to a qualified gunsmith and they'll sort it right out.

BigRich
08-15-2009, 8:00 PM
"that slop is just normal overtravel"
I think you meant take up. Over travel occurs after the sear releases and before the trigger comes to rest against magazine release. An over travel screw reduces this to prevent jarring of the sight picture.

Trendkill, one thing about 1911 pistols, you can adjust the weights of the trigger pull to some extent by carefully bending the three leaf spring. Conversely, you can make the gun empty a full magazine in an uncontrolled manner by going too far in one direction. You have to know what you are doing. Buy Jerry Kuhnhausen's book on the 1911. Quite an education. Have a competent gunsmith examine your pistol and set the trigger up properly.

bin31z
08-15-2009, 8:38 PM
"that slop is just normal overtravel"
I think you meant take up. Over travel occurs after the sear releases and before the trigger comes to rest against magazine release. An over travel screw reduces this to prevent jarring of the sight picture.

Trendkill, one thing about 1911 pistols, you can adjust the weights of the trigger pull to some extent by carefully bending the three leaf spring. Conversely, you can make the gun empty a full magazine in an uncontrolled manner by going too far in one direction. You have to know what you are doing. Buy Jerry Kuhnhausen's book on the 1911. Quite an education. Have a competent gunsmith examine your pistol and set the trigger up properly.

Oops. I meant take up. You are correct about the overtravel adjustment as well.

Trendkill
08-15-2009, 10:32 PM
Thankyou very much for the info....I am going to have it looked at. I didnt know 1911's were so finicky....they sure are intriguing.

bin31z
08-16-2009, 1:10 AM
To be perfectly honest, in modifying, working on and shooting 1911's, I've had more malfunctions on a 1911 then any other pistol or firearm. USP' have never jammed on me. Glocks jam up once in a while. Rimfires tend to have problems as well. However, 1911 pistol are usually the most expensive and also the most prone to malfunctions. Go figure, still love them to death though.

bsg
08-16-2009, 1:47 AM
bain and davis is a gun shop in the city of san gabriel. it is in the san gabriel valley if you live close. there is a gunsmith present during open hours. i don't know if this type of gun is his "thing" but he is very knowledgeable and the shop is reputable. my experience with this gun shop has been positive. good luck on your new project and have fun!

Trendkill
08-16-2009, 8:32 AM
Well...I live in San Jose....in the SF Bay Area. Does anyone know a good gunsmith well versed in 1911's around here...??

I have had quite a few pistol's.....but this one is really cool. I keep wishing I could ask my friend what it is exactly that he had done to this gun...but...of course I cant... :(

Trendkill
08-16-2009, 8:33 AM
Or.....is there anyone on here that really knows their stuff that would be willing to come take a look at this gun...??? I live in San Jose.

Trendkill
08-16-2009, 10:03 AM
"that slop is just normal overtravel"
I think you meant take up. Over travel occurs after the sear releases and before the trigger comes to rest against magazine release. An over travel screw reduces this to prevent jarring of the sight picture.

Trendkill, one thing about 1911 pistols, you can adjust the weights of the trigger pull to some extent by carefully bending the three leaf spring. Conversely, you can make the gun empty a full magazine in an uncontrolled manner by going too far in one direction. You have to know what you are doing. Buy Jerry Kuhnhausen's book on the 1911. Quite an education. Have a competent gunsmith examine your pistol and set the trigger up properly.

There is a screw in the center of the trigger...I assume that is what you are talking about.

ojisan
08-16-2009, 10:13 AM
Or.....is there anyone on here that really knows their stuff that would be willing to come take a look at this gun...??? I live in San Jose.

Los Angeles area here...if you ever head south...

SCMA-1
08-16-2009, 10:45 AM
There is a screw in the center of the trigger...I assume that is what you are talking about.

The screw in the trigger is to adjust the overtravel. You can use this screw to limit the amount of trigger travel after the sear breaks. It's safe to play with this adjustment; try it and see how it works. If you adjust it too far, the hammer won't fall so then you must turn the screw the opposite way until the hammer actually falls when you press the trigger. Minimize the overtravel for a quick resetting trigger and rapid follow up shots.

SCMA-1

BigRich
08-16-2009, 12:23 PM
The screw in the trigger is to adjust the overtravel. You can use this screw to limit the amount of trigger travel after the sear breaks. It's safe to play with this adjustment; try it and see how it works. If you adjust it too far, the hammer won't fall so then you must turn the screw the opposite way until the hammer actually falls when you press the trigger. Minimize the overtravel for a quick resetting trigger and rapid follow up shots.

SCMA-1

The proper way to set over travel is to screw the stop in until the trigger will not allow the hammer to fall. Start unscrewing it (while holding the hammer so you can feel it release but not let it fall) until it releases. Slowly let the hammer move through it's arc. You will feel the sear rub against the edge of the hammer hooks and then the half cock notch. You want to unscrew it far enough that it no longer bumps the half cock notch edge. You feel this by allowing it to swing back and forth with your thumb controlling it and the trigger pulled. I hold the gun in the firing position so I can release the grip safety and pull the trigger. I control the hammer wih my support hand thumb.

In my experience 1911s are not finicky, just demanding that the operator understand and really know the pistol. If they are properly adjusted, have high quality magazines, springs and ammunition, and properly cleaned and lubricated then they are some of the most reliable pistols going. I have some custom built 1911s that have gone the full 500 rounds between cleanings (my routine) without incident so many times that I don't even think about it. They are also unbelievably accurate with good ammunition.

They do need proper maintenance and a good supply of routine replacement parts (mostly springs) in order to be reliable. Think of a well tuned 1911 like a hot rod. You have to keep it in shape and it performs.

SCMA-1
08-16-2009, 12:32 PM
The proper way to set over travel is to screw the stop in until the trigger will not allow the hammer to fall. Start unscrewing it (while holding the hammer so you can feel it release but not let it fall) until it releases. Slowly let the hammer move through it's arc. You will feel the sear rub against the edge of the hammer hooks and then the half cock notch. You want to unscrew it far enough that it no longer bumps the half cock notch edge. You feel this by allowing it to swing back and forth with your thumb controlling it and the trigger pulled. I hold the gun in the firing position so I can release the grip safety and pull the trigger. I control the hammer wih my support hand thumb.

In my experience 1911s are not finicky, just demanding that the operator understand and really know the pistol. If they are properly adjusted, have high quality magazines, springs and ammunition, and properly cleaned and lubricated then they are some of the most reliable pistols going. I have some custom built 1911s that have gone the full 500 rounds between cleanings (my routine) without incident so many times that I don't even think about it. They are also unbelievably accurate with good ammunition.

They do need proper maintenance and a good supply of routine replacement parts (mostly springs) in order to be reliable. Think of a well tuned 1911 like a hot rod. You have to keep it in shape and it performs.

Thanks for the detailed procedure for adjusting the trigger overtravel.:thumbsup: I like your analogy of 1911's to hot rods; they're very similar in nature. I have had custom built 1911's that were unreliable and required subtle but skilled adjustment to make them run with perfect reliability. Once setup properly, they are amazing shooters.

SCMA-1

M1A Rifleman
08-16-2009, 5:19 PM
A simple fix. My series 80 did this after many rounds. You need to remove the main spring and bend the middle spring which I think is the hammer spring.

bin31z
08-16-2009, 7:26 PM
The proper way to set over travel is to screw the stop in until the trigger will not allow the hammer to fall. Start unscrewing it (while holding the hammer so you can feel it release but not let it fall) until it releases. Slowly let the hammer move through it's arc. You will feel the sear rub against the edge of the hammer hooks and then the half cock notch. You want to unscrew it far enough that it no longer bumps the half cock notch edge. You feel this by allowing it to swing back and forth with your thumb controlling it and the trigger pulled. I hold the gun in the firing position so I can release the grip safety and pull the trigger. I control the hammer wih my support hand thumb.

In my experience 1911s are not finicky, just demanding that the operator understand and really know the pistol. If they are properly adjusted, have high quality magazines, springs and ammunition, and properly cleaned and lubricated then they are some of the most reliable pistols going. I have some custom built 1911s that have gone the full 500 rounds between cleanings (my routine) without incident so many times that I don't even think about it. They are also unbelievably accurate with good ammunition.

They do need proper maintenance and a good supply of routine replacement parts (mostly springs) in order to be reliable. Think of a well tuned 1911 like a hot rod. You have to keep it in shape and it performs.

Well...the comparison is good, but hot rods are no honda civics either. If you head over to 1911 ezine, you'll see that they get jams on RRA pistols, Wilson 30th anniversary pistols, Cylinder & Slide pistols etc etc. I've shot guns tuned by many gunsmiths and some I did for myself, and sometimes jams just happened randomly. Like just the other day, I shot 500 rounds out of a Hoag tuned gun. He did all the reliability stuff. Out of the 500 rounds, I had a weird jam where the slide was locked back but the empty shell got crushed between the magazine and the front of the ejection port. No idea what happened, the extractor must have let the shell go too early or the shell caught on the magazine follower. Really odd but never happened again.

08duramax
08-16-2009, 11:38 PM
Wow. I had no idea it was so bad to let the slide forward on an empty chamber on a 1911. I'm going to have to remember this. Been doing this for a few years, not excessively, and have more than 7000 rounds through my 1911

Trendkill
08-20-2009, 10:39 PM
Well...I test fired the gun today. It was having some big problems with extraction. It would try to jam a fresh round right in behind an empty still in the chamber. The gun is accurate as hell though....very. I will be dropping off the gun for a check up at my local gunsmith....so he can check all the spring's...check the extractor...examine the sear engagements etc etc.

SCMA-1
08-20-2009, 10:43 PM
Well...I test fired the gun today. It was having some big problems with extraction. It would try to jam a fresh round right in behind an empty still in the chamber. The gun is accurate as hell though....very. I will be dropping off the gun for a check up at my local gunsmith....so he can check all the spring's...check the extractor...examine the sear engagements etc etc.

Sounds like the extractor tension needs to be adjusted.

Trendkill
08-20-2009, 10:49 PM
Sounds like the extractor tension needs to be adjusted.

Yeah....its probably something minor....just little tweaks here and there is probably all it needs. It sure sends the rounds straight though....and I feel the 1911 curse gripping me more and more.

Trendkill
08-23-2009, 10:04 AM
Sounds like the extractor tension needs to be adjusted.

I removed the extractor and gave it a slight bend to increase tension....we'll see if that helped.

LAWABIDINGCITIZEN
08-23-2009, 8:29 PM
Never drop a slide on an empty chamber. Although, some single action pistols are fairly tolerant of this practice, the 1911 is one of the least tolerant. SCMA-1

I knew about this on 1911's, but it this an issue on DA/SA autos with decockers as well?


I guess it's a good habit to never do it without a snap cap anyway, but could this damage pistol's other than 1911's????