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View Full Version : Cousin in EOD training, and I want to give moral support :)


Angie
08-11-2009, 6:27 PM
Hello all,

My cousin is in EOD training in Alabama, and I got his address and want to send him letters and things to keep him from getting homesick. He's halfway through his training and his mom says he is hitting a mental slump and getting discouraged and sad.

What helped you get through training? What were you sent that you loved, what do you wish you were sent by family members? What did you not get to keep, or didn't really care to receive?

Any suggestions, ideas, personal experiences? Thanks!! :)
Angie

D53
08-11-2009, 7:04 PM
I know when I was in OSUT at Benning for 11B, I always looked forward to just getting a letter from my GF at the time ( now my wife) just a half a page of misc info telling me whats going on and knowning that her and my family where proud of me, always made my day. But to each their own. I am not sure what EOD AIT is like, if he can make phone calls or visit the PX, but usually once you get those freedoms back after certain fases ( once again, I only experianced OSUT for 11B) you start to feel a little more connected again.

Once A Marine
08-11-2009, 8:12 PM
Hello all,

My cousin is in EOD training in Alabama, and I got his address and want to send him letters and things to keep him from getting homesick. He's halfway through his training and his mom says he is hitting a mental slump and getting discouraged and sad.

What helped you get through training? What were you sent that you loved, what do you wish you were sent by family members? What did you not get to keep, or didn't really care to receive?

Any suggestions, ideas, personal experiences? Thanks!! :)
Angie

As long as he's out of boot camp, he should be able to receive and keep just about anything you can legally send.

The best would be something small (easily stored and travelled with), that has some sort of sentimental meaning, and a steady stream of updates from home. I'm not sure how that works nowadays with email and cell phones and text messages, but in my day it was letters.

Also, anything unique to home - for me, coming from Philadelphia, it was things like Tastykakes.

gvazquez
08-11-2009, 8:31 PM
well, somebody has to do it, but I'd be pretty bummed knowing the death rate for EOD techs and what you should expect going out. I worked with EOD in route clearance and always wondered what those guys were thinking.... What is it that has him all sad? it might be his job :(

gunsmithcats
08-11-2009, 8:35 PM
tell him to watch the hurt locker.


hahaha j/k
Personally things that helped were food from home, magazines, etc.
THings that'll make him smile.

M47_Dragon
08-11-2009, 8:57 PM
Letters, letters, letters... maybe some letters, and oh yeah, LETTERS!

Throw in some personal photographs, maybe of friends & family holding signs that say "We miss you, ____! Can't wait to see you again!" etc.


And last but not least, this famous photo:

http://technoweirdo.com/chrisWorks/images/Humor/Bomb-Squad-Prank.jpg


Hmmm. Okay, maybe not. ;)

haiedras
08-13-2009, 12:53 AM
Concur with M47.

EOD school is like a combination of rote-memorization cram school and an electrical engineering course, with a ridiculous drop rate. Anything you can send him that is encouraging and reminds him of why he decided to be an EOD guy helps.

5968
08-13-2009, 9:43 PM
My favorite thing to receive from home while I was in AIT was homemade cookies. Nothing makes a day better than fresh cookies, and yes most of the time they were still fresh when I got them. Thinking about it now, even the dried out cookies were good. Bottom line is the food really sucked, but you ate it because you were hungry. Any food that came from home was very welcomed.

EOD3
08-17-2009, 6:04 PM
My experience is "dated" but, back in the days of "USS NeverSail" the curriculum was VERY high pressure. A normal day was Classes from 0700 to 1700 and study hall from 1800 until around 2230-2300. The pressure was intentional and there's not really a lot that can be done about it.

Encouragement can't hurt! Every EOD tech needs a good folding knife (think Buck 110-ish) and maybe one of the SOG multi-tools (one of the EOD models with cap crimper and C4 spike) would be useful.

Rob454
08-17-2009, 6:30 PM
Anything bro. Letter a small gift anything. My family wasnt supportive. I had a few buddies who shared their gifts or letters. That got me through

midvalleyshooter
08-18-2009, 6:50 AM
Back in the day I received a small AM/FM radio from my mom. We huddled around that thing for news and music. In those days letters were the thing and cookies are always good. Pictures of loved ones also can mean a lot.

Thank him for his service.

Keith

Soldier415
08-18-2009, 6:54 AM
well, somebody has to do it, but I'd be pretty bummed knowing the death rate for EOD techs and what you should expect going out. I worked with EOD in route clearance and always wondered what those guys were thinking.... What is it that has him all sad? it might be his job :(
EOD Techs have a very low death rate.

Where did you do route clearance? Iraq or the 'Stan? I'm doing RCP in Afghanistan currently.

Oh, and angie, send him a blow up doll

EODGrunt
08-31-2009, 8:05 PM
EOD Techs have a very low death rate.

Where did you do route clearance? Iraq or the 'Stan? I'm doing RCP in Afghanistan currently.

Oh, and angie, send him a blow up doll



I'm not sure where you get your data. Perhaps the guys you have worked with have been fortunate. In the Marine Corps, EOD has the highest casualty rate for any MOS. We are at around 8% deaths, 20% wounded.

The Navy EOD program is second only to the SEALS due to the incidents they ran into in Afghan.

I know the Army teams have had their share of misfortune.

Perhaps the different missions pursued by the different services explains it....

For example, few Marine EOD teams due route clearance anymore in any country.

Most Marine EOD teams participate in foot patrols and raids while inbedded with infantry and recon units.


Either way, stay safe.

To the OP....

EOD basic skills training is often difficult. The sexy image portrayed on TV is not seen in any phase of basic EOD training. Tell him to continue to stay strong and to not give up. If he makes it past Alabama (only the Army goes there I believe), he will go to Eglin AFB Florida to the Navy School. There he will be for another 8 months or so.

As long as he has good friends, a good support network and personal drive, he will make it. Otherwise the drop rate is very high.