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View Full Version : Marlin Camp Carbine 45 / Ruger PC 40


HEUER
06-10-2005, 11:58 PM
I have been thinking about purchasing a CA legal semi auto carbine in a pistol caliber since the AWB of 2000. About four years ago I had an oppurtunity to purchase a Marlin Camp carbine, but it was chambered in 9 and not 45, and I wasn't looking for a carbine in 9 at the time. This carbine would be used for plinking at 50 yards. I was wondering what people thought of the Ruger PC 40 since the Marlin is no longer in production? Are there other options available in CA in a pistol cal other than lever actions? Thank you for your thoughts

NorCalGuy
06-11-2005, 2:38 AM
For 50 yard plinking I'd get a PC-9. Much cheaper to shoot and plenty for 50 yards.

-hanko
06-11-2005, 6:38 AM
I purchased a Camp 9 at a gunshow last year for $285; it came with a folding stock, an original marlin mag, 2 SW 59-series mags, and 25 and 30 round aftermarket mags. It's a very reliable & relatively accurate shooter.

Last week I transferred a nib Camp 45; purchase price was $400 & transfer was another $20. I'm going to shoot it this weekend & can give a brief range report if anybody's interested.

Both guns are supposed to have long term issues with the plastic recoil buffer; I have Wolfe springs in higher (16.5 and 22 lb.) ratings than the Marlin stock (11 lb.) springs. Plan is to put the 16.5 spring in the 9mm and the 22 pounder into the .45 & see what happens. So far, with the stock spring, the 9mm shoots reloads (147gr at ~ 1050 fps) without noticible battering.

The Marline Camp carbines are similar to giant 10-22's on the inside, the bolt and recoil systems are identical in design. They're easy guns to field strip; the trigger housing is a biatch to reassemble as the sideplates are separate pieces, but making up a few slave pins & taking your time makes putting it all back together not much of a hassle.

Construction-wise, Camp carbines are more robust than a Ruger PC gun. You can get good feals on 'em by being patient. Either can be scoped with an inexpensive Weaver mount. Nice home defense guns & fun on the range & in the woods. Reloading gets you bullets for either in the 8 cents a round range, more or less. Lead bullets work just fine, and both calibers are easy to load. I have no .40 pistols & have no desire to get one; guess if I did I might look at a Ruger PC gun.

-hanko

HEUER
06-11-2005, 11:36 AM
I understand that the 45 acp model had some quality problems because the 45 acp round caused stress on the wooden stock causing it to crack. If anyone has a lead on a 9 mm camp carbine in SF Bay Area I would be interested.

TonyNorCal
06-11-2005, 3:16 PM
Originally posted by -hanko:
Construction-wise, Camp carbines are more robust than a Ruger PC gun.
-hanko

You're saying a Ruger PC-9 is less robust than a Camp-9?

Why Ruger doesn't make a PC-45 is simply beyond me. Does anyone have an idea or care to venture a guess?

06-11-2005, 8:50 PM
Originally posted by heuer:
If anyone has a lead on a 9 mm camp carbine in SF Bay Area I would be interested.

Hmmm...
I've been in the same boat once before.

There was a poster in your area that had a Camp 45 when I asked the same thing (http://calguns.net/groupee/forums/a/tpc/f/7736030741/m/99410062421) recently.
Maybe drop them a PM?

HEUER
06-11-2005, 9:05 PM
Thank You for the heads up. I am starting to lean towards the PC 9, although I do like the look of a wooden stock. I have a couple of accessories that I need to sell before I will make a move. I have thought about the police carbine a few years ago, but after AWB 2000 I primarily was buying HBAR bolts for my trips to the range and a PC was not a priority. I thought a pistol chambered carbine would be fun and a change from 7.62 x 51 / 5.56 / 7.62 x 39. A PC in 45 ACP would be great, but like the Ruger XGI it will probably never happen.

06-11-2005, 9:16 PM
Originally posted by heuer:
I am starting to lean towards the PC 9, although I do like the look of a wooden stock.

I hear ya, but how will you get a 1911 magazine into the Ruger though?
http://calguns.net/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

HEUER
06-11-2005, 10:22 PM
I found this through google:

Nice gun with a couple of exceptions:


The .45 notorious for cracking stocks directly behind receiver, Marlin corp. has send me 3 replacement stocks at no charge... they all cracked. I finally had to have my gunsmith epoxy-treat the area in the stock just behind the receiver, it hasn't broken since. The only aftermarket stock that is available for it is made by Ram-line. I bought one for it (a Ramline) back in 1994 and it broke in half in a couple of months... cheap stuff.

Feed & "bolt hold open" problems occur, made worse with any magazine other then the Marlin mag that came with it, or colt 1911 mags. It is apparently due to "floaty" followers, and loose tolerances in general in the majority of aftermarket mags. Usually it is a mis-feed as opposed to a jam, whereas the ammo gets cocked in an upward position inside the breech just above the mag housing, with the bolt resting on it. I know that a softer recoil spring would help this problem, but a better buffer and some trimming of the ejector rod would also be needed; because the gun already throws brass about 40 feet as it is... plus the bolt comes back very violently against the receiver backstop buffer.

The feed ramp sucks. It only directs the ammo "directly up"; plus it not an integral part of the barrel breech.... shoddy design, using a simple spring to secure it against the breech.

The weapon must be ENTIRELY disassembled in order to clean it, and it is NOT an engineering masterpiece (I.E. quick and easy to break down and re-assemble).

It commonly runs away into a full-auto mode, laying down 3 to 5 shots on it's own. I blame this problem on a cheap trigger group and a weak (by design) sear mechanism.

-hanko
06-12-2005, 6:46 AM
Originally posted by heuer:
I found this through google:

Nice gun with a couple of exceptions:


The .45 notorious for cracking stocks directly behind receiver, Marlin corp. has send me 3 replacement stocks at no charge... they all cracked. I finally had to have my gunsmith epoxy-treat the area in the stock just behind the receiver, it hasn't broken since. The only aftermarket stock that is available for it is made by Ram-line. I bought one for it (a Ramline) back in 1994 and it broke in half in a couple of months... cheap stuff.

Not sure how old the google site you found is, but Chaote machine has folders. Cracking stocks point to too much recoil, something probably easily handled by a stronger recoil spring, maybe...I'll see later today. Super Glue/Hot Stuff also makes a good stock sealer/reinforcement, as would relieving a little wood in the area that's prone to cracking

Feed & "bolt hold open" problems occur, made worse with any magazine other then the Marlin mag that came with it, or colt 1911 mags. It is apparently due to "floaty" followers, and loose tolerances in general in the majority of aftermarket mags. Usually it is a mis-feed as opposed to a jam, whereas the ammo gets cocked in an upward position inside the breech just above the mag housing, with the bolt resting on it. I know that a softer recoil spring would help this problem, but a better buffer and some trimming of the ejector rod would also be needed; because the gun already throws brass about 40 feet as it is... plus the bolt comes back very violently against the receiver backstop buffer.

Brass that gets tossed a mile away indicates the need for a stronger spring, not a softer one. Post doesn't indicate bullet type, but since both the Camp 9 and 45 use microgroove rifling, the bullet needs to be copper jacketed. If feeding is an issue, RN or HP's are indicated as opposed to SWC or flat nose.

The feed ramp sucks. It only directs the ammo "directly up"; plus it not an integral part of the barrel breech.... shoddy design, using a simple spring to secure it against the breech.

The weapon must be ENTIRELY disassembled in order to clean it, and it is NOT an engineering masterpiece (I.E. quick and easy to break down and re-assemble).

Trigger group stays clean enough that a quick wipe without disassembly does the job; the receiver/bolt group dismounts from the trigger group with two pins, like a 10-22. Complete disassembly of the trigger group is not difficult, but that might also be a user issue.

It commonly runs away into a full-auto mode, laying down 3 to 5 shots on it's own. I blame this problem on a cheap trigger group and a weak (by design) sear mechanism.

I can only hope http://calguns.net/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif http://calguns.net/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

-hanko

HEUER
06-12-2005, 12:15 PM
Thank you for responding to my post, it gives me plenty to think about. I no longer go to the gun shows anymore, they are just not the same as they used to be fourteen years ago. I will keep my eyes open at the local shops. Once again thank you for you post hanko.