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View Full Version : Glock Dry Fire to Smooth Trigger?


jkchan83
08-06-2009, 2:27 PM
I have resolved the fact that dry firing my Glock is good practice without a high probability of damaging the firearm. Furthermore, many people (both here and at GlockTalk) recommend firing around 1,000 rounds to truly smooth out the trigger on a Glock. (And to smooth out the shooter.)

Considering the price and rarity of ammunition these days, I was wondering if dry-firing would have a similar effect on the trigger (as I believe it will on the shooter). So, does dry-firing "break in" the Glock just as well as live firing?

Bobshouse
08-06-2009, 2:30 PM
Not really. Glock is a whole nother animal...not your typical handgun with all the little parts to smoothout dry firing it a couple of thousand times.

C_1
08-06-2009, 2:47 PM
I dry fire my Glock with snap caps a few minutes a day, and it helps me with my trigger pull (watching the front sight), and I guess it does/could smooth out the trigger a lil bit. Or maybe its just my finger getting better and smoother at pulling trigger?

bohoki
08-06-2009, 2:52 PM
put a bit of gooey grease on your striker tail

Black Majik
08-06-2009, 2:52 PM
$0.25 trigger job would be much more effective and less tiring with better results than dryfiring 1000 times. Though you'd probably gain more as a shooter with the 1K dryfires than polishing the small parts.

Pick up a 3# connector while your at it and it makes the biggest difference. All three (polish small parts, 3# connector and dryfiring) would most likely significantly improve your groups.

rips31
08-06-2009, 2:57 PM
or, you can be really cheap and stick an empty casing in the chamber...instant poor-man's snap cap.

jkchan83
08-06-2009, 3:00 PM
put a bit of gooey grease on your striker tail

I'm not sure what you mean by "gooey grease." What effect would that have on the trigger pull?

$0.25 trigger job would be much more effective and less tiring with better results than dryfiring 1000 times. Though you'd probably gain more as a shooter with the 1K dryfires than polishing the small parts.

Pick up a 3# connector while your at it and it makes the biggest difference. All three (polish small parts, 3# connector and dryfiring) would most likely significantly improve your groups.

I will probably end up doing the $0.25 trigger job, but I've read that waiting until there is some wear on the parts helps you to see how much to polish. I don't want to install a lighter connector as this is used as a bedside gun. Should I need to use it for self defense, I don't want to give an over-eager DA or civil attorney any ammunition. (Sorry, couldn't help it.)

bohoki
08-06-2009, 3:17 PM
I'm not sure what you mean by "gooey grease." What effect would that have on the trigger pull?




sorry "gooey grease" is my slang term for stalube "super white"

it is a very odd concoction it stays put and stays slippery even when dirty

sammy
08-06-2009, 3:25 PM
I second Richard's response with a .25c trigger job but would go with a 4.5lb. Glock disconnector if you are going to use the gun for self defense. I have had a defective 3.5lb. aftermarket disconnector that stopped working after 300 rounds. I just installed the Glock 4.5 disconnector and did the .25c trigger job on my new G19 and all I can say is WOW. It cut the trigger pull by 1/3 and made it much smoother than stock. I only spent 30 seconds working each part against an old rag untill it shined taking no materal off any of the parts. Good luck, Sammy

Oh, and dry fire away. If you look at the Glock striker you will see just how stout the thing is. I have only seen one broken Glock striker which broke off the very tip that makes contact with the primer. I have no idea how many rounds were through the gun but it was the most worn Glock I have ever seen.

roc
08-06-2009, 3:30 PM
or, you can be really cheap and stick an empty casing in the chamber...instant poor-man's snap cap.

this is not as easy to do as it sounds. i have a hard time loading an empty casing into the chamber cus the extractor claw cant really get a grip on the casing when its not loaded from a magazine. and i really dont want to jam the edge of a brass without a bullet into my feed ramp. how do you load your empty brass?

I also do a lot of dry fire practice with my XD and my 1911 using snap caps. it is much easier to troubleshoot to see if you are pushing or pulling the gun when there is no recoil after the shot. I am sure it does help to smooth out the trigger and striker assemblies but without the slide racking back, it wouldn't be the same as breaking in using live ammo.

stix213
08-06-2009, 3:34 PM
It helped me

I recently purchased a GLOCK 26 as my first handgun, when I fired it a few hundred times I was hitting nowhere near where I meant to. I'm not too bad with a rifle, but I was hitting mostly low and left with the GLOCK.

Problems with my trigger finger placement and how I was pulling the trigger was moving the aim of my handgun seemed the most likely cause. So on someone else's suggestion I tried dry firing it to see what the aim does without any recoil... Sure enough, the gun would jerk low and left when I pulled the trigger. To work on that I went on to dry fire my GLOCK probably 200 times, and yes including a couple times in the mirror with my new toy, thinking it was ok since it is in the manual to do so when properly unloading the weapon... Yes the manual actually tells you that when you unload your GLOCK you need to dry fire it. I didn't use snap caps or anything like that.

I didn't notice it slowly happening at first, but to my surprise when I was done I noticed that the trigger was SIGNIFICANTLY loosened up. Way easier to pull - so much so that I actually was worried I broke something. Fortunately the next day I went on to put another 150 rounds through it without any issue, and also were much closer to where I meant to put them :)

So I don't know if I would say that I recommend it, but dry firing my GLOCK definitely smoothed out and loosened up my trigger a lot.

Slim
08-06-2009, 4:08 PM
Can someone give me the details of the .25 trigger job?

Futurecollector
08-06-2009, 4:12 PM
Can someone give me the details of the .25 trigger job?
+.25

MasterYong
08-06-2009, 4:18 PM
What's everyone's obsession with snap caps?

I've had countless "experts" tell me they're worthless. A solution looking for a problem, if you will. I've read a lot of articles that say they're worthless too.

I say, dry fire away. I've dry fired my XD probably 10,000+ times with no problems. No excess wear on any parts that I can tell. I don't see how a firing pin can break from dry firing. I've heard the arguments but this is a pin that strikes metal (that then creates a small explosion) on a regular basis... over extending it seems like it should be OK.

gibbygoo
08-06-2009, 4:19 PM
Can someone give me the details of the .25 trigger job?

http://www.google.com/search?q=.25+trigger+job :rolleyes:

Voo
08-06-2009, 4:26 PM
The .25 cent trigger is pretty basic and works to smoothen your trigger. You can have the perception that it's lightening the trigger, but in reality, the .25 cent trigger job isnt suppose to remove enough material to actually change the dimensions of your trigger- ie, the reset and take up arent going to change..

Here's an HTML version of it:
http://www.alpharubicon.com/mrpoyz/glock/

Here are Youtube versions Part 1 & 2:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bpChV_vfgzo

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eLnTEkzqNc8&feature=fvw

It helps TREMENDOUSLY to have access to a polishing tool like a Dremel or whatnot- Flitz is also a plus. The .25 cent trigger job is ridiculously easy for the average person, just be patient and dont overdo it. There's plenty of tutorials out there on how to assemble/diassemble and perform the mod. Also, in a worst case scenario, it's easy to replace all the parts with new OEM ones in the event you became to overzealous with polishing..

If you've done the .25 cent trigger as outlined, it shouldnt remove any of the reliability inherently found in a glock.

Also a comment regarding snap caps. They're not necessary, but at the same time, there's nothing wrong with using them. If you do a search, you'll see at least one person has experienced a cracked breechface while dry firing. Whether this was from the dry firing or bad metallurgy, I dont know. But that energy from the spring/striker is going somewhere and for the most part, its getting transferred to the breechface. I personally think it was a fluke. There are so many glocks out there and I know quite a few competitive shooters who dry fire glocks without snap caps. For me, I dry fire without snap caps simply because Im too lazy to get them out of my range bag. YMMV

MasterYong
08-06-2009, 4:38 PM
The .25 cent trigger is pretty basic and works to smoothen your trigger. You can have the perception that it's lightening the trigger, but in reality, the .25 cent trigger job isnt suppose to remove enough material to actually change the dimensions of your trigger- ie, the reset and take up arent going to change..

Here's an HTML version of it:
http://www.alpharubicon.com/mrpoyz/glock/

Here are Youtube versions Part 1 & 2:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bpChV_vfgzo

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eLnTEkzqNc8&feature=fvw

It helps TREMENDOUSLY to have access to a polishing tool like a Dremel or whatnot- Flitz is also a plus. The .25 cent trigger job is ridiculously easy for the average person, just be patient and dont overdo it. There's plenty of tutorials out there on how to assemble/diassemble and perform the mod. Also, in a worst case scenario, it's easy to replace all the parts with new OEM ones in the event you became to overzealous with polishing..

If you've done the .25 cent trigger as outlined, it shouldnt remove any of the reliability inherently found in a glock.

Also a comment regarding snap caps. They're not necessary, but at the same time, there's nothing wrong with using them. If you do a search, you'll see at least one person has experienced a cracked breechface while dry firing. Whether this was from the dry firing or bad metallurgy, I dont know. But that energy from the spring/striker is going somewhere and for the most part, its getting transferred to the breechface. I personally think it was a fluke. There are so many glocks out there and I know quite a few competitive shooters who dry fire glocks without snap caps. For me, I dry fire without snap caps simply because Im too lazy to get them out of my range bag. YMMV

That, and you have to dry fire a glock to disassemble it, and no where in the manual does Glock say to insert a snap cap before doing that (I'm not even sure that would be possible).

C_1
08-06-2009, 7:20 PM
Of course you have to dry fire to disassemble a Glock. But repeated dry firing may not be good. I know a lot of people do it and its still good. But using snap caps dont hurt.

I don't do it, but, if you wanted, you could still disassemble a Glock by dry firing with a snap cap in the chamber. But removing the barrel would be a PITA.

jkchan83
08-06-2009, 9:04 PM
Thanks for all of the responses so far.

I'm not really concerned about dry-firing. I have some snap caps, but like Voo, I'm usually too lazy to go get them, at least in my Glock.

I'm trying to determine if dry-firing will improve the feel of the trigger. I have no problem with performing the $0.25 trigger job and have done it on an older Glock. However, I also did it after nearly 1000 rounds through it and I could very clearly see wear marks to indicate where to polish. It made the trigger just a bit smoother.

What I would like to know is whether dry-firing will have the same impact as 1000 rounds. I would like to assume that most parts will wear the same whether a round is fired or not, but I can't be sure, so I thought I would ask the Calguns collective.

Rudolf the Red
08-06-2009, 9:27 PM
I dry fire my Glock with snap caps a few minutes a day, and it helps me with my trigger pull (watching the front sight), and I guess it does/could smooth out the trigger a lil bit. Or maybe its just my finger getting better and smoother at pulling trigger?

As a coach, I beg people to do this. Now, I am talking about this from a competitive angle, but it will help anyone shoot a handgun better.

You are adding finger strength while at the same time devoloping the dexterity to operate the trigger smoothly.

Dry firing is one of the best training tools you can use. I am a firm believer in it.

B Strong
08-07-2009, 6:31 AM
I have resolved the fact that dry firing my Glock is good practice without a high probability of damaging the firearm. Furthermore, many people (both here and at GlockTalk) recommend firing around 1,000 rounds to truly smooth out the trigger on a Glock. (And to smooth out the shooter.)

Considering the price and rarity of ammunition these days, I was wondering if dry-firing would have a similar effect on the trigger (as I believe it will on the shooter). So, does dry-firing "break in" the Glock just as well as live firing?

No - dry firing will not induce the wear required to "smooth-out" a Glock Trigger.

Dry firing will promote good trigger control though, and I recommend it with the condition that you follow the safety rules involved.

locosway
08-07-2009, 7:34 AM
Snap caps do have a use, such as seeing if you have feed problems.