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View Full Version : Does your hand shake after shooting?


bin31z
07-25-2009, 9:58 AM
When I shoot steel framed guns like the 1911 for more than 50 rounds at the range, my hands starts to shake from the bashing its taking. What sucks is that this effectively ruins my accuracy and ruins my range trip. Does this happen to anyone else?

Greg-Dawg
07-25-2009, 10:02 AM
After 50 rounds? No. But 500+ rounds, yes. Maybe you're gripping too hard.

It probably happens to me when I'm stressed out or when I'm distracted at the range. Most of my range time consists of immediate focus and relaxation.

SCMA-1
07-25-2009, 10:10 AM
No shaking, but I do notice a big difference between shooting steel framed and polymer framed guns. I love the soft recoiling characteristics of poly frame guns; I even notice that aluminum alloy guns are softer shooting than steel framed guns.

There has been a mostly recent shift in opinion away from the use of shok buffs in 1911's; I still use them not only to minimize the chance of frame battering but also to soften the recoil characteristics of my 1911's, particularly the steel framed ones. As long as they don't hamper the reliability of operation and I change them out regularly, they do yield the desired benefits.

SCMA-1

bin31z
07-25-2009, 10:17 AM
Hmm..maybe I am gripping too hard. I tend to fight the recoil with my wrist to try to get fast follow up shots.

Greg-Dawg
07-25-2009, 10:20 AM
Hmm..maybe I am gripping too hard. I tend to fight the recoil with my wrist to try to get fast follow up shots.

Dry firing practice helps.

PatriotnMore
07-25-2009, 10:25 AM
No, but I do like to smoke, and cuddle with my gun.:)

SCMA-1
07-25-2009, 10:29 AM
Hmm..maybe I am gripping too hard. I tend to fight the recoil with my wrist to try to get fast follow up shots.

Try relaxing your grip in your shooting hand and increasing your grip pressure with your support hand, about 40% shooting hand to 60% support hand ratio.

Greg-Dawg
07-25-2009, 11:01 AM
Try relaxing your grip in your shooting hand and increasing your grip pressure with your support hand, about 40% shooting hand to 60% support hand ratio.

Interesting, it's always been the other way around for me and it works. Whatever works comfortably is what matters.

creampuff
07-25-2009, 11:08 AM
If I go more than 3 months without shooting, and I start off with the 0.40 or 0.45, then I notice I do get a slight tremor. Almost like a rolling tremor, as though I have Parkinson's.

Three things that work for me:
1. Don't go shooting on a empty stomach. Hypoglycemia, tends to worsen the shakes.
2. Don't overgrip. For whatever reason, I want to give the firearm a deathgrip if I haven't gone shooting in a while.
3. Start off slower. Either start off with 9mm's or just take the first 20 rounds slowly, for my body to regain a little muscle memory.

It does show to me the importance of practicing regularly. If I were in a home defense situation, I won't have the luxury of items 1 to 3. :o

yasushi
07-25-2009, 11:13 AM
Try relaxing your grip in your shooting hand and increasing your grip pressure with your support hand, about 40% shooting hand to 60% support hand ratio.

Yea, until I got the same advice from an old time at the range I had the same problem.

Ishoot
07-25-2009, 11:20 AM
I don't have the shakes but I do notice when I don't go to the range for more than a couple of weeks. Have a much harder time focusing than when I go weekly. Practice DOES make perfect. :)

GunDog
07-25-2009, 12:18 PM
When I shoot steel framed guns like the 1911 for more than 50 rounds at the range, my hands starts to shake from the bashing its taking. What sucks is that this effectively ruins my accuracy and ruins my range trip. Does this happen to anyone else?

Only after shooting my Smith Model 500 but, that was with the factory rubber grips. Have since put on a set of custom Herrett Trooper stocks.

bin31z
07-25-2009, 12:34 PM
If I go more than 3 months without shooting, and I start off with the 0.40 or 0.45, then I notice I do get a slight tremor. Almost like a rolling tremor, as though I have Parkinson's.

Three things that work for me:
1. Don't go shooting on a empty stomach. Hypoglycemia, tends to worsen the shakes.
2. Don't overgrip. For whatever reason, I want to give the firearm a deathgrip if I haven't gone shooting in a while.
3. Start off slower. Either start off with 9mm's or just take the first 20 rounds slowly, for my body to regain a little muscle memory.

It does show to me the importance of practicing regularly. If I were in a home defense situation, I won't have the luxury of items 1 to 3. :o


yea...i don't get out to the range as much as I'd like. Hopefully with more practice, this goes away.

Beelzy
07-25-2009, 12:35 PM
Looks like somebody is getting just a little too excited while shooting.

I would only start worrying if an erection occurs during said shaking. :p

POLICESTATE
07-25-2009, 12:55 PM
BWAHAHAHAHA, what if you get one when you're shooting anyway, shakes or no? I wonder what Freud would say.

Looks like somebody is getting just a little too excited while shooting.

I would only start worrying if an erection occurs during said shaking. :p

SCMA-1
07-25-2009, 1:06 PM
Looks like somebody is getting just a little too excited while shooting.

I would only start worrying if an erection occurs during said shaking. :p

....only thing worse would be an inadvertent discharge.


.................:p:o

LesGrossman41510
07-25-2009, 1:39 PM
sounds like gripping too hard, this happened to me when i would go through a box or two with my baby glock, the kick on my G27 is so much.

CSACANNONEER
07-25-2009, 1:42 PM
My hand will shake before during and after my first shot at a big buck. Other than that, it takes 250-500 rounds through my alloy framed 1911 to get me to start shaking and, that's only sometimes.

TurboS600
07-25-2009, 2:16 PM
I have had the same problems. It started when I first qualified with the 1911 in the USMC. I was shaking so bad that both guys on either side of me at the range took a step back and started to watch me to see if I would go postal. The RSO took note and walked up next to me and grabbed my weapon in both hands and took me aside to ask what was up. I was a little nervous and it was cold and damp so he let me go ahead. The end of the 1911 was going back and forth probably 2-4 inches. The more I fired, the better I got. Ended up qualifying pistol expert with 333/350. Still happens once in a while though. I would follow creampuff's and SCMA-1's recommendations. Sage advice there.

Mr. Beretta
07-25-2009, 2:19 PM
No.

chefdude
07-25-2009, 6:04 PM
Only when I need a drink.....hahahahah

epic4444
07-25-2009, 6:31 PM
ya mine does after the first hundred or so..depends on the caliber...after i shoot my ppk i have it after the first mag

CSDGuy
07-25-2009, 7:00 PM
My hands only shake after shooting if I've been gripping any handgun too hard. I don't fight the recoil. I just try to keep the pistol pointed at the target and the recoil just happens while I'm trying to do that. I just grip hard enough to keep the pistol grip from shifting while under recoil. As to the strong/weak hand grip... I grip about 50/50. Works for me so far.

BamBam-31
07-25-2009, 8:12 PM
Ditto the gripping too hard idea. You don't need to squeeze the tar out of it. Just a firm grip, like a firm handshake. Keep your wrists firm, arms bent slightly at the elbows to absorb recoil. Shaking after 50 rds. means something's wrong.

illuminate10
07-25-2009, 8:25 PM
If I didn't shoot like I should, yea. :)

tEN wOLVES fIVE sHOOTER
07-25-2009, 8:38 PM
When your hand starts shaking after only 50 rounds, this is FATIGUE, you might want to work on your hand, arm and shoulder muscles, and when using your fingers to grip a ball lets say, don't just do the squeezing exercise alone, fully extend your fingers in the opposite direction, put your fingers tips on the edge of a table or anything that will work, now put pressure on your fingers so that they are extending backwards, do this just to stretch your finger muscles, this helps the blood flow to get to your muscles, if you just have a death grip on something you cut off blood flow and create FATIGUE, work on your fore arms and shoulders, this will also help reduce fatigue.

Try this, I think you will be happy with the results

Regards

tEN wOLVES

coop44
07-25-2009, 9:19 PM
personally, I have tried different stances. Popular logic says stand square to the target extend your firing hand directly in front and support the base of the gun with your other, with my back and shoulder problems this is quite uncomfortable.

after a little research, I went back a few decades in my stance, now I shoot turned at 90 degrees to my target, sighting down my right arm with my back slightly arched and my left arm behind me in the small of my back. Tremendous improvement(for me) and a lot less pain.Oh yeah, I usually take a few asprin or advil prior to going, thins the blood, helps circulation.

(this also presents a smaller target(god forbid) to an opponent)

another problem I have seen alot of, even from the most experienced shooters, the attempt to Control Recoil. This will wear you out quickly, by the time that muzzle flips up the bullet is away, let it do what it wants to do(within reason) a firm grip is good, but as stated before, a white knuckle death grip does not work. in the attempt to control recoil I have seen many shooters pull their muzzle down and hit low on the 2nd shot.

(BTW I go early to the range, no coffee, no sugar, fewer numbskulls to piss me off, usually leave pretty happy)

forgiven
07-26-2009, 1:49 AM
Before, during and after. It's the mania I go through when shooting. I've had it for years.

xibunkrlilkidsx
07-26-2009, 11:35 AM
No but i usually have a hard on though. is that weird?

bin31z
07-26-2009, 7:06 PM
Part of the problem might be that I go to the gym too much and my arms are always sore to some degree. I think I'm just going to give myself some rest and try to go the range more and try to to choke the handgun!