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View Full Version : Where did the locked container come from?


locosway
07-24-2009, 12:35 AM
While transporting a firearm that can be concealed on a person it must be secured in a locking container.

Why?

Will this stop people from doing drive by shootings?

I'm a little confused why I can walk down the street with an unloaded gun, but I can't drive my car with one. The car is more private than walking down the street, why the drastic difference?

Librarian
07-24-2009, 12:40 AM
While transporting a firearm that can be concealed on a person it must be secured in a locking container.

Why?

Will this stop people from doing drive by shootings?

I'm a little confused why I can walk down the street with an unloaded gun, but I can't drive my car with one. The car is more private than walking down the street, why the drastic difference?

12026.1 and .2 were followup laws to the original 12025 - which had NO clear provision for transporting a concealable handgun without CCW.

Why they chose that solution I do not know.

And you CAN drive in your car with an unloaded, unconcealed handgun; the limitation on both is the usual 'sterile areas' and 'gun free school zones'.

Mike's Custom
07-24-2009, 12:45 AM
YOu asking common sense questions. Shame on you.

forgiven
07-24-2009, 9:23 AM
It's just another senseless test in populace control.

paul0660
07-24-2009, 9:24 AM
It started when they began to make lots of cars without trunks.

locosway
07-24-2009, 9:44 AM
It started when they began to make lots of cars without trunks.

What year?

Also, what is the law supposed to prevent?

Theseus
07-24-2009, 11:49 AM
What year?

Also, what is the law supposed to prevent?

Year, I don't know, but 12025 is the law. 12026 is what provides exemptions to 12025. The purpose was to outlaw concealed carry where the firearms would be immediately available for use as a firearms.

Requiring a locked case prevents you from having it "immediately available for use as a firearm".

locosway
07-24-2009, 12:00 PM
Year, I don't know, but 12025 is the law. 12026 is what provides exemptions to 12025. The purpose was to outlaw concealed carry where the firearms would be immediately available for use as a firearms.

Requiring a locked case prevents you from having it "immediately available for use as a firearm".

I see.

8-Ball
07-24-2009, 12:12 PM
Year, I don't know, but 12025 is the law. 12026 is what provides exemptions to 12025. The purpose was to outlaw concealed carry where the firearms would be immediately available for use as a firearms.

Requiring a locked case prevents you from having it "immediately available for use as a firearm".

like when you actually need it...?

locosway
07-24-2009, 12:20 PM
like when you actually need it...?

Not just that, but if there's a law restricting loaded firearms, why restrict unloaded ones? Does it make a difference if a gun is locked up or not if it's unloaded?

Access to said gun wouldn't make a difference, it can't be used since it's unloaded.

All of the other laws of intent to commit a crime and loaded firearms pertain, and criminals don't care about laws anyway, so I was just wondering why it even matters.

Scratch705
07-24-2009, 12:58 PM
b/c law makers think it does actually curb criminals. that it was "save the children" from drive-bys.....

that and its just another way to make it more hassling to own a gun, and thus another step in disarming the public. harder they make it to own a gun, the less some people will.

tombinghamthegreat
07-24-2009, 1:05 PM
I'm a little confused why I can walk down the street with an unloaded gun, but I can't drive my car with one. The car is more private than walking down the street, why the drastic difference?

You can drive with one(handgun has to be unconcealed, rifle any way you want meaning you can conceal or open carry) just have to avoid certain places like school zones. You could even drive with an AR in your lap with the loaded mags right next to the gun.

FastFinger
07-24-2009, 1:14 PM
You can drive with one(handgun has to be unconcealed, rifle any way you want meaning you can conceal or open carry) just have to avoid certain places like school zones. You could even drive with an AR in your lap with the loaded mags right next to the gun.

But only with a hands free cellphone.

Librarian
07-24-2009, 2:22 PM
What year?

Also, what is the law supposed to prevent?

Trunks are not relevant to the legislation.

12025 was before 1986, because 12026.1 was 1986. See http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/showthread.php?t=73975

12025 is supposed to prevent people without CCW from carrying a handgun concealed, by punishing that behavior, thus discouraging it.

If you can find a good reason for 12025 as applied to most non-felons, you will have done much more than any legislator has ever done. That is, there's no point to looking for reasons for gun control laws in the effects of the laws themselves; the laws exist primarily because some voters are/were fearful and some politicians judged it would be good for their re-election chances if they were to appear to 'do something' to address those fears.

Mike's Custom
07-25-2009, 1:23 PM
The mid 90s started the locked container thing. Glove boxes and center consoles are not legal even with a lock on then but I don't know why not. Then later on, late 90s or early 2000s the locked container became a UNLOADED in a locked container which meant NO ammo could be in the locked container with the firearm. Now, you can have the gun and mags with ammo in the container.

locosway
07-25-2009, 1:43 PM
Is there a way to get a utility box defines per the courts?

In all honesty, anything could be construed to be a utility box, even a tackle box could be said as such.

Librarian
07-25-2009, 4:15 PM
Is there a way to get a utility box defines per the courts?

In all honesty, anything could be construed to be a utility box, even a tackle box could be said as such.

Slight mis-quotation: "the utility or glove compartment."

A free-standing, removable 'thing' is more likely a 'locked container'. 'Compartments' are (we think) a (reasonably) permanent part of the vehicle, thus the cautions you see here about bolting down a safe in the passenger area - it's possible that some oddly trained LEO might think that the immovability made such into a 'compartment'.

But 'compartment' is not defined anywhere. OTOH, we don't get reports here of arrests for not following 12026.1/.2 because of 'compartment' problems.

locosway
07-25-2009, 6:08 PM
Slight mis-quotation: "the utility or glove compartment."

A free-standing, removable 'thing' is more likely a 'locked container'. 'Compartments' are (we think) a (reasonably) permanent part of the vehicle, thus the cautions you see here about bolting down a safe in the passenger area - it's possible that some oddly trained LEO might think that the immovability made such into a 'compartment'.

But 'compartment' is not defined anywhere. OTOH, we don't get reports here of arrests for not following 12026.1/.2 because of 'compartment' problems.

Wondering if someone built an armory into their vehicle if that would cause problems.

Ron-Solo
07-25-2009, 6:22 PM
A utility compartment usually refers to a center console commonly found in SUV's and such.