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View Full Version : Pistol Shooting - 1911 @ 25 yards


Jason762
07-16-2009, 9:40 AM
Went shooting last Saturday and fired about 150 rounds with my 1911. I noticed most of my shots landed to the right of the 12 to 6 o'clock line.

Lucky for me my former smallbore coach was at the range that day and helped me out a bit. Turns out I had been squeezing the entire grip with my trigger hand instead of pulling straight back.

After correcting this (along with my stance), my shots improved remarkably. But still not good, in my opinion.

With these changes, I noticed instead of a 6 o'clock hold, it shifted to a 7 o'clock hold. Is this alright? Sadly, by the time I had finished my coach had left, so I couldn't ask him about this change in hold.

Hopefully you guys know. Any harm in a 7 o'clock hold, or should I "muscle" it/shift my body to hold at at 6 o'clock?

Jason

hybridatsun350
07-16-2009, 9:44 AM
Definitely don't muscle it. Just change your stance slightly so that you naturally go to a 6 o'clock hold.

Also, 25 yards is a long way if you're trying to get accustomed to the basics of accurate pistol shooting. Back up to 7-10 yards and try to really tighten your groups up.

This may help...
http://img22.imageshack.us/img22/6898/bullseyechart.gif

Z ME FLY
07-16-2009, 9:49 AM
Definitely don't muscle it. Just change your stance slightly so that you naturally go to a 6 o'clock hold.

Also, 25 yards is a long way if you're trying to get accustomed to the basics of accurate pistol shooting. Back up to 7-10 yards and try to really tighten your groups up.

This may help...
http://img22.imageshack.us/img22/6898/bullseyechart.gif

I love the chart! haha I print it out and blow it up and shoot it so I know wth I am doing wrong.

Greg-Dawg
07-16-2009, 9:51 AM
Stay with the fundamentals: Front sight and trigger control.

Those are the foundations, and everything else will fall into place.

Jason762
07-16-2009, 9:57 AM
Definitely don't muscle it. Just change your stance slightly so that you naturally go to a 6 o'clock hold.

Also, 25 yards is a long way if you're trying to get accustomed to the basics of accurate pistol shooting. Back up to 7-10 yards and try to really tighten your groups up.

This may help...
http://img22.imageshack.us/img22/6898/bullseyechart.gif

Thanks for the chart. For left handed shooters, you reverse everything right (except for 12 and 6 o'clock)?

Also my shots were all over the target, mostly from the centerline right with maybe 5 extra shots in the 4:30 to 5:30 region. Of course after the adjustments my coach recommended, most of my shots were going 2:30 to 3:30 area hovering around the 9 and 8 ring.

Stay with the fundamentals: Front sight and trigger control.

Those are the foundations, and everything else will fall into place.

For the front sight and trigger control I got that stuff down. I was a smallbore and highpower shooter, so I am very aware of the two.

One thing my coach pointed out was how my front sight dipped after the trigger broke. He says that's a symptom of squeezing side to side rather than front to back.

Jason762
07-16-2009, 10:05 AM
Here we are. I knew I had something like this:

http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d12/Jason762/LeftHandedHandgunTargetAnalysisGuid.jpg

Army
07-16-2009, 6:50 PM
Or.........move your front sight.

Seems you are consistent with your shots, regardless of how or when the trigger breaks. So, move the sights.

MiguelS
07-16-2009, 7:32 PM
I am starting at 7 -10 yds....been doing good at that, keeping them in the 9-10 ring. Once constant on the 10 ring, I will move back another 5 yds. Ihope by the time I get to 25 yds, I will hitting the 10 mark all the time since my eyes, fingers, stance and muscles will be trained.

Good luck. Use the chart it helps alot. Print it out and take it with you.

CalNRA
07-16-2009, 10:49 PM
two tricks I learned from more experienced shooters:

1: before each range session, dry fire with a snap cap 50 times to get you technique right.

2: every once in a while put a snap cap in the middle of a magazine and see how you hand is behaving. A lot of bad habits show up real quick when the gun doesn't go boom.

another thing that worked for me was using a CO2 air pistol with DA trigger. It provided cheap practice with atrociously heavy trigger pull, then when I pick up the 1911s they are just so easy to shoot.

JiminCA
07-18-2009, 11:16 AM
If you haven't already done so, try increasing the grip tension in your weak hand. Strong hand should be relatively relaxed. Maybe 60-40 weak/strong.

when a RH shooter squeezes too much with right hand, the gun pulls right.

Have you noticed how your sights are lifting when you touch off the shot? If you know what it looks like when you're shooting right, the angle they lift at can tell you that you've got your grip honked up.

Dangerous1
07-18-2009, 3:51 PM
I don't know about everyone else but for me, my stance and rigidity of my arm makes the biggest difference. If I pay too much attention to my trigger finger and forget about my stance/arms, my grouping wavers.

1. Feet shoulder width apart
2. Knees just slightly bent
3. Waist slightly bent forward
4. Shift my weight forward but don't compensate by sticking my butt out too much, until I feel my weight over the balls of my feet. This helps to load my body forward to absord recoil and repeatably stand rock steady.
5. With elbows slightly bent, point gun down range and lift elbows out and up until I can feel tension in my shoulders. This effectively locks my arms to make a firm bi-pod.

This will usually keep me on paper at 15yds without even concentrating on my trigger finger yet. Anyhoo, that's what works for me.

HowardW56
07-18-2009, 6:05 PM
I love the chart! haha I print it out and blow it up and shoot it so I know wth I am doing wrong.
:D
:D
:D
:D
:D
:D

BamBam-31
07-18-2009, 11:40 PM
I don't lock my arms. I unlock them a bit to absorb some of the recoil. In fact, that's one of the main reasons I disliked the Weaver stance--strong arm is too straight, support arm is too bent. W/ isoseles, both arms are almost equal in being slightly bent.

Grayblue
07-19-2009, 2:34 AM
...

With these changes, I noticed instead of a 6 o'clock hold, it shifted to a 7 o'clock hold. Is this alright? Sadly, by the time I had finished my coach had left, so I couldn't ask him about this change in hold.

Hopefully you guys know. Any harm in a 7 o'clock hold, or should I "muscle" it/shift my body to hold at at 6 o'clock?

Jason
Unless you have a pistol with incorrectly set sights, there is no reason to aim anywhere left or right of the center of target.

If you have to put the sight indication point at 7'O clock to the point of aim to hit the center because you have a bad technique, then you are counting on yourself consistantly using bad technique. So, there is a harm in 7'O clock hold.


...
This may help...
http://img22.imageshack.us/img22/6898/bullseyechart.gif

I would not recommend use of that to anyone. It's based on oversimplified assumption that "if your shot missed by landing here, then you're doing this" which is flatout wrong. 5 O'clock miss is jerking? Jerking can make shots land anywhere.

Jason762
07-19-2009, 8:29 AM
Unless you have a pistol with incorrectly set sights, there is no reason to aim anywhere left or right of the center of target.

If you have to put the sight indication point at 7'O clock to the point of aim to hit the center because you have a bad technique, then you are counting on yourself consistantly using bad technique. So, there is a harm in 7'O clock hold.

I would not recommend use of that to anyone. It's based on oversimplified assumption that "if your shot missed by landing here, then you're doing this" which is flatout wrong. 5 O'clock miss is jerking? Jerking can make shots land anywhere.

Ahh, thank you sir! That's what I was looking for. I will fiddle with my grip/stance until I get a 6 o'clock hold.

Again, many thanks!
Jason

MAC USMC
07-19-2009, 12:54 PM
Could I please that "This may help bullseye at least two more times?