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View Full Version : Need Advice On Lever Action Rifle


bodger
07-14-2009, 10:23 AM
This is some noobie stuff, and I apologize in advance.

I want to purchase a lever action rifle in 45 LC caliber. Range shooting and pig hunting will be my primary use for this rifle.
It's been a long time since I handled a lever action. I have my eye on the Rossi model 92 in stainless with 24" Octagon Barrel.

I see that these rifles come with a thumb safety. I'm confused as to how ths works and what exactly it prevents.
You load the rifle, cycle the action, the round is chambered and the hammer is back and ready to fire.
Do you have to release the safety to get the trigger pull at that point?
And then if you don't pull the trigger or take the shot, and ease the hammer forward, isn't there a transfer bar that prevents AD from a drop?

Since to the best of my recollection, a lever action is not double action, how the heck does this safety work, and what does it prevent you fom doing?

Not to mention the fact that a thumb safety looks really retarded on a classic lever action.

Also, is there any advantage / disadvantage to the 24" barrel?
As best I can ascertain, Rossi doesn't make an octagon in anything less than that length. I'm not inflexible, but I do like the SS with the octagon.

Thanks for any guidance that can be offered.

rabagley
07-14-2009, 12:24 PM
The Rossi safety is a firing pin block. If you pull the trigger with the hammer back, the hammer will fall, and the firing pin should be prevented from striking the primer (assuming the safety is working properly). As for safeties on leverguns, it's common to think they're retarded, but manufacturers consider a mechanical safety to be "industry standard" and therefore very risky to eliminate.

On dropping the hammer, you can let it down to half cock or all the way down. At half cock, the hammer can't fall further without recocking it, so there's almost no possibility of an AD based on hammer movement from there. When you drop the hammer all the way with the hammer resting on the rear of the firing pin assembly, you could get an inertial discharge if the firing pin safety was off or malfunctioning. Don't know of an inertially engaged transfer bar in the Rossi design.

On barrel length, I prefer a shorter barrel myself. Over 20" won't buy you much velocity and leverguns aren't normally for distance shots anyway. Barrel length choices are one reason why I'm a fan of the Marlin leverguns.

bodger
07-14-2009, 12:43 PM
The Rossi safety is a firing pin block. If you pull the trigger with the hammer back, the hammer will fall, and the firing pin should be prevented from striking the primer (assuming the safety is working properly). As for safeties on leverguns, it's common to think they're retarded, but manufacturers consider a mechanical safety to be "industry standard" and therefore very risky to eliminate.

On dropping the hammer, you can let it down to half cock or all the way down. At half cock, the hammer can't fall further without recocking it, so there's almost no possibility of an AD based on hammer movement from there. When you drop the hammer all the way with the hammer resting on the rear of the firing pin assembly, you could get an inertial discharge if the firing pin safety was off or malfunctioning. Don't know of an inertially engaged transfer bar in the Rossi design.

On barrel length, I prefer a shorter barrel myself. Over 20" won't buy you much velocity and leverguns aren't normally for distance shots anyway. Barrel length choices are one reason why I'm a fan of the Marlin leverguns.

Thanks, I appreciate the info. I guess my "retarded" comment was a bit untoward, anything that makes a firearm more safe is a good thing. I just think their placement on the Rossi looks ugly, and I'm used to my Glocks that have no safety.
In fact, I would say that the Glock being "hot" when there is one in the chamber has made me an overall more safe handler of firearms.