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View Full Version : .357 sig vs. .400 corbon


st.clouds
06-26-2009, 11:23 PM
Battle of the bottlenecked cartridges.

It seems to me that the .400 Corbon gives much better performance than the .357 sig, and very similar ballistic to the 10mm. I bet if a .45 super brass were used, the .400 corbon could best the 10mm in ballistic performance. Not only that the corbon would actually be lower pressured, milder recoiling, easier to fire follow up shots with, has bigger bore and the magazine would fit nicely in a slim grip (not so with the long 10mm). Perhaps its only drawback would be limited magazine capacity due to fatter bullets but that imo is a small drawback - if at all, especially here where the magazine is limited to 10 rounds.


So why isn't the LEO like Texas Ranger or the FBI going ga ga over this cartridge? Or for that matter, why isn't this caliber any more popular than it is now? or be made by more manufacturers?

Btw if the .400 corbon can mimic or best 10mm in performance, why can't we make a .357 corbon? It should have the .357 magnum ballistic in a mid-sized semi-auto handgun. Wouldn't that be cool?

aplinker
06-27-2009, 1:07 AM
Simple: for the same reason they weren't ga ga over 10mm.

10mm was dumped in favor of 40"Short and Weak" because the FBI ladies couldn't handle it.

Poohgyrr
06-27-2009, 1:51 AM
There are too many rounds that should be more popular than they are. For real 357 Magnum ballistics, just buy one. ;)

Coonan is scheduled to bring back a new version of their .357 Magnum Automatic, with ten round mags, this fall.

Here is my old Coonan Model B , that I probably should have kept:

http://img205.imageshack.us/img205/6907/coonan357magnum2cf.jpg



or, just buy one of S&W's eight shooters like the 627 Pro or this M27:

http://img261.imageshack.us/img261/8258/pcm27im1.jpg

SVRider
06-27-2009, 10:08 AM
The problem is that these cartridges "mimic" the rounds they are trying to emulate only at the lower/mid weights. As you start to use heavier bullets, they don't have the stuff to move them out like a 357mag or a 10mm (loaded to original specs) can.

Keep in mind, as pressures start to go up, so does wear and tear on your pistols. I've finally given up on the idea of converting and am just building a 6" 10mm from the getgo. I think it's the best way....

SVRider
06-27-2009, 10:10 AM
There are too many rounds that should be more popular than they are. For real 357 Magnum ballistics, just buy one. ;)

Coonan is scheduled to bring back a new version of their .357 Magnum Automatic, with ten round mags, this fall.

Here is my old Coonan Model B , that I probably should have kept:

http://img205.imageshack.us/img205/6907/coonan357magnum2cf.jpg

Yup...you should have kept it! :D

While you had it, did you ever shoot a box of WWB 110gr? It puts on a light and noise show almost equal to my LAR Grizzly's!

Texwanders
06-27-2009, 2:43 PM
Never have messed with a .357 Sig, but have owned & shot a fair amount of .400 CB. Both are known to be effective defensive rounds. The .357 Sig was designed to duplicate the ballistics of the famous .357 magnum 125 gr Hollow point load, which various folks reported to be the best manstopper used by police, and do it in a high-cap semi auto pistol.

The viability of either one depends on what you want a semi auto pistol to do for you. I traded off my 1911 .400 CB barrel & dies to another forum member. I own a 10mm 1911 already, and the CB does not offer much advantage ballistically.

I will warn you, handloading for either one of these cartridges you will find to be worthy of a Advanced Handloader's degree. It is very difficult to get the bullets tight enough in the case to prevent the bullet from being pushed deeper during action cycling. That's the most hazardous problem. Modification of the expander ball for tighter bullet fit, taper crimping, and (maybe) chanellured bullets are the way to go. By the way, be sure you use cases with small primer pockets, as the early ones with large pockets tended to pierce primers. Also, .45 ACP cases didn't work well for re-sizing, as it left the case necks too thick to work in my barrel.

What I did find very useful about the .400 is that with just a barrel and dies, you can take a .45 cal 1911 and easily reduce its power to 9mm levels, with reduced loads. Nice for someone with a kid or wife who likes the pistol, but not the .45 cal recoil, and much cheaper than buying a 9mm pistol.

If you contemplate owning one, and don't handload, the .357 Sig is a better deal as several sources exist for loaded ammo. Not so with the Cor-Bon, as only they sell the loaded ammo.

The 10mm case is the parent for the .40 S&W, the .357 Sig, and the 9 x 25 Dillon. I suppose you could shoot all of them from the same 10mm 1911, given the right barrel and (maybe) magazine. If you own a .40 cal popular auto pistol, presumably you could just drop in a .357 Sig barrel and get busy. Whether a bad guys would notice the difference or not is debatable :)

JohnJW
06-27-2009, 4:50 PM
So why isn't the LEO like Texas Ranger or the FBI going ga ga over this cartridge? Or for that matter, why isn't this caliber any more popular than it is now? or be made by more manufacturers?



.357 Sig was backed by Sig Saurer and Federal ammo while Corbon is a boutique ammunition manufacture and that's why .400 Corbon never took off.