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masameet
06-25-2009, 12:04 PM
What other reasons besides working for or tipping off the Mafia or some other gang, extorting/taking bribes, and civil rights violations can a cop find himself the focus of a federal probe?

If, according to an FBI investigation, a cop turns out to be "dirty," gets taken off the PD payroll, and is court-ordered to reimburse somebody he put in prison, would you as a LEO defend him because he is a cop?

SVT-40
06-25-2009, 12:19 PM
To many "what Iff's" to really make a reasonable judgment.

You also make no mention of any conviction. So nothing could happen until the accused was found guilty.

As in the case of the San Diego Officer who shot a woman last year during a "road rage" incident. At the time the news media and others (including some here on Calguns) were calling for the officers head.

Recently, he was found not guilty of all charges.

Untamed1972
06-25-2009, 12:42 PM
What other reasons besides working for or tipping off the Mafia or some other gang, extorting/taking bribes, and civil rights violations can a cop find himself the focus of a federal probe?

If, according to an FBI investigation, a cop turns out to be "dirty," gets taken off the PD payroll, and is court-ordered to reimburse somebody he put in prison, would you as a LEO defend him because he is a cop?

Any kind of corruption could trigger that. Aside from what you mentioned things lie witness tampering/threatening, distruction/falsification of evidence, perjury.

Think stuff like was going on with the LAPD Rampart scandal.

Usually if the feds get involved it wasn't because of a one time thing, but suspicion of a pattern of corruption.

Unit74
06-25-2009, 12:44 PM
To many "what Iff's" to really make a reasonable judgment.

You also make no mention of any conviction. So nothing could happen until the accused was found guilty.

As in the case of the San Diego Officer who shot a woman last year during a "road rage" incident. At the time the news media and others (including some here on Calguns) were calling for the officers head.

Recently, he was found not guilty of all charges.

Was this the one where he was in Oceanside at the Home Depot and she was drunk, high and tried to run him over while he was on foot? She also had the kid in the car?

1911su16b870
06-25-2009, 12:44 PM
I was just thinking about that thread SVT-40 and just heard the officer was found not guilty while the other party pleaded guilty to child endangerment and drunk driving.

Here's the link... (http://www3.signonsandiego.com/stories/2009/jun/23/bn23white-job-back/?metro&zIndex=121447)

ETA: updated the other thread in the OT forum...looking forward to reading any comments.

emilio
06-25-2009, 12:44 PM
that's a very interesting question! i've wondered that, as well: can the FBI just stick its nose in to any internal PD affairs? what legal line must be crossed for them to step in? for example, the FBI stepped in to investigate the disappearances of civil rights activists (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mississippi_civil_rights_worker_murders) in 1964, which was a clear case of corruption on multiple levels of local LE. what about if it's not so clear?

similarly, local LE will sometimes turn over an investigation to the FBI - even if it doesn't cross state lines. (or, they flat out take over investigations if the movies are to be believed.) why would they do this, or why would they have to?

- emilio

gumby
06-25-2009, 1:22 PM
Civil rights, "color of authority", federal law violations will get the FBI involved.

eltee
06-25-2009, 4:16 PM
Besides what has been previously mentioned, almost ANY violation of federal law can, theoretically, initiate an FBI investigation. I've seen local cops rolled up by the FBI for firearms and other BATFE regulated issues, RICO, civil rights, interstate crime, etc. plus the FBI can be called in to provide undercover folks from out of state so they don't accidentally get recognized, even if the alleged crime is not of a federal nature (indirectly, you can tie almost any state felony into some sort of federal no-no). Since the FBI is the investigative arm of the US attorney / USDOJ, anything linked to a federal code violation is fair game.

Could be something as far fetched as a cop making bootleg copies of movies or copyrighted software on a home computer for profit while off duty.

SVT-40
06-25-2009, 4:56 PM
Was this the one where he was in Oceanside at the Home Depot and she was drunk, high and tried to run him over while he was on foot? She also had the kid in the car?

Yup, that's the one.

TreboR
06-26-2009, 2:05 PM
Was this the one where he was in Oceanside at the Home Depot and she was drunk, high and tried to run him over while he was on foot? She also had the kid in the car?

Yes that's the one EDIT.

ilbob
06-26-2009, 2:43 PM
What other reasons besides working for or tipping off the Mafia or some other gang, extorting/taking bribes, and civil rights violations can a cop find himself the focus of a federal probe?

Could be a violation of any federal law. From dealing drugs to stock fraud to having NFA items not in compliance with federal law. Being a cop does not exempt him from being the focus of a federal probe unrelated to his employment.

BigDogatPlay
06-26-2009, 11:50 PM
Oakland Housing Authority PD brouhaha back in the 1990's. I knew guys who were wrapped up in that. Civil rights, false police reports and warrant affidavits, theft of evidence, inhumanity to prisoners, robbery of suspects... you name it, there were a small group of guys doing it. The US Attorney and the FBI ran with it all, rather than just the civil rights stuff, in part (I was told) because OHA takes a huge sum of federal subsidy money.

Several people went to federal prison behind all that. One guy I recall went for 8 years.

OneNcustdy
06-30-2009, 1:05 PM
Yes that's the one where "quick draw Mcgraw" shot an 8 year old child :(


Yeah thats the one with the mother who was drunk off her butt decided to place her child in danger and drive with drugs in her system and is on probation. She is the sole person responsible for her actions and the fate of that child. The woman could have easily drove her car into the home depot killing hard blue collar workers with their children.

yzernie
06-30-2009, 1:55 PM
Yes that's the one where "quick draw Mcgraw" shot an 8 year old child :(
Was this comment really necessary? :shrug:

TreboR
07-01-2009, 2:02 PM
Comment was not necessary, comment withdrawn BUT I do believe it was an irresponsible discharge of a firearm. Situation could have been handled in a number of ways most of which did not have to end in a shooting of a child. The mother on the other hand, well she's lucky it wasn't a fatal shot.

Carry on.

retired
07-01-2009, 5:48 PM
Comment was not necessary, comment withdrawn BUT I do believe it was an irresponsible discharge of a firearm. Situation could have been handled in a number of ways most of which did not have to end in a shooting of a child. The mother on the other hand, well she's lucky it wasn't a fatal shot.

Carry on.

You are correct, the comment wasn't necessary and it was good that you removed it. Also, it doesn't really matter whether you believe it was an irresponsible discharge of a firearm and wanted to post that opinion here for two reasons.

1. The officer was found not guilty

2. Your statement is in violation of the rules as posted by Kestryll in the sticky at the top of the forum. Please reread #3 and #6.

MIB
07-01-2009, 6:11 PM
Anything in 18 USC

Besides what has been previously mentioned, almost ANY violation of federal law can, theoretically, initiate an FBI investigation. I've seen local cops rolled up by the FBI for firearms and other BATFE regulated issues, RICO, civil rights, interstate crime, etc. plus the FBI can be called in to provide undercover folks from out of state so they don't accidentally get recognized, even if the alleged crime is not of a federal nature (indirectly, you can tie almost any state felony into some sort of federal no-no). Since the FBI is the investigative arm of the US attorney / USDOJ, anything linked to a federal code violation is fair game.

Could be something as far fetched as a cop making bootleg copies of movies or copyrighted software on a home computer for profit while off duty.

bshnt2015
07-02-2009, 6:09 AM
With Oaklland Police. it was the "Riders" incident-OPD patrol units on dogwatch alleged excessive force and planting evidence-this was brought up after an probationary officer failed fto. It does happens with the fbi stepping in to investigate a city/county/state agency.

masameet
07-06-2009, 8:59 PM
Great replies. Thank you.

Here's an instance where BATFE talked to a cop who claimed he "bought a few military-style rifles, left them in his car and — on the same night — forgot to lock a door. He couldn’t explain why he didn’t file a police report or why he visited Mexico the day after the alleged theft" (Source (http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/front/6505651.html)).

I suppose this officer can now kiss his career goodbye?

Also if a federal agency looked at off-duty San Diego Officer White (for shooting that DUI driver and her son), I'm curious as to why. Did the driver claim her civil rights had been violated? Or is federal scrutiny a given in off-duty officer-involved shootings?