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Great Equalizer
06-23-2009, 12:02 AM
First let me say hello to everyone. I'm new here, this is my first post, I'm not new to shooting, but I'm new to sport shooting. My question is: how do I choose a good Single Action Revolver? I'm not looking to compete in CAS or anything, but I do want a reputable weapon, not one that brings laughter and whispers at the sight of her, definitely a cowboy style SAR probably a .45. Main use will be protection in the home, from wife and others :eek:, and protection when outdoors. I see so many and don't know what to choose. The price range I would like to stay in is $400 - $600. There's Uberti, Cimarron, Taylor's & Co., the Ruger Vaquero, and the Beretta Stampede to name a few that I've seen. Any or all would be great. Can some give some incite please? Thanks!

Rekrab
06-23-2009, 12:11 AM
I was fondling a few at Fowler's just the other day, really like the heft and feel of the Rugers. Hated the Beretta. I believe they had a .44 50th Anniversary Blackhawk for $515.

They also carry Uberti and Cimarron. But only buy from them if you don't mind paying more than you would elsewhere...

1JimMarch
06-23-2009, 2:40 AM
First, see if you can answer four questions:

1) Do you need 44Magnum-class power, or can you get by with either the 357Magnum (up to 800 ft/lbs energy) or one of the moderate-speed big-bores like the 45LC or 44Special (around 500-550ft/lbs energy)?

2) Do you want it to have an internal drop-safety or not? In other words, a real 1873 Colt SAA and many of the modern clones of same lack an internal safety: figure anything by Colt, USFA, Uberti, AWA and others will fit in this category. This means you have to take extra care, and when loading you load one, skip one, load four. That puts the hammer under the empty sixth chamber - also known as "five beans in the wheel". That's how Wyatt Earp and all those other guys back then did it...unless they KNEW trouble was coming and loaded the sixth :). Rugers, Berettas, the Freedom Arms '97 series and Taurus' "Gaucho" have internal, modern safeties that prevent it going boom unless the trigger is deliberately pressed - they're as safe to carry six-up as any modern DA revolver. Which way to you want to go?

3) Do you want adjustable sights or fixed? Adjustable isn't as "period correct" but if you mess around with a lot of different loads, pretty damned handy.

4) Price range?

Based on that, we can guide you further.

Miltiades
06-23-2009, 3:01 AM
I've had experience with Ruger single action revolvers, and would recommend them highly. I have a Blackhawk .357 magnum and a Vaquero .44 magnum. These guns are very solid and well made, and have never given me any problems.

http://i116.photobucket.com/albums/o25/pogo2/TwoRugers35.jpg

1siktkt
06-23-2009, 3:57 AM
Out of the makers you have listed I would take a Ruger first, Uberti/Cimarron next. Ruger recently (few years ago) changed the frame size of the Vaquero to more feel more like a Colt SAA. If you want to use this in CAS then you need to be sure whatever gun you decide on fits into their rules (sights, caliber, etc.) .45lc is a great round that can run from "powderpuff" loads to "hot loads" that can reach close to .44 mag power. I have a Bisley Vaquero and love it. I would get the Ruger old style frame because I like the extra weight of it but the new style frame is good and feels a lot like a colt

TheBundo
06-23-2009, 4:16 AM
Ruger first. Strong enough for very heavy loads

B Strong
06-23-2009, 4:58 AM
First let me say hello to everyone. I'm new here, this is my first post, I'm not new to shooting, but I'm new to sport shooting. My question is: how do I choose a good Single Action Revolver? I'm not looking to compete in CAS or anything, but I do want a reputable weapon, not one that brings laughter and whispers at the sight of her, definitely a cowboy style SAR probably a .45. Main use will be protection in the home, from wife and others :eek:, and protection when outdoors. I see so many and don't know what to choose. The price range I would like to stay in is $400 - $600. There's Uberti, Cimarron, Taylor's & Co., the Ruger Vaquero, and the Beretta Stampede to name a few that I've seen. Any or all would be great. Can some give some incite please? Thanks!


For recreational/HD use, I'd go with a Ruger Blackhawk convertible in .45 Colt..45 ACP.

Check some out and choose the barrel length that feels best to you.

Rugers are plenty strong, you can use the Buffalo Bore heavy loadings in .45 Colt or roll your own if you want to get into reloading, or you can use simple 230 grain ball .45 ACP loads for plinking.

dfletcher
06-23-2009, 7:37 AM
First let me say hello to everyone. I'm new here, this is my first post, I'm not new to shooting, but I'm new to sport shooting. My question is: how do I choose a good Single Action Revolver? I'm not looking to compete in CAS or anything, but I do want a reputable weapon, not one that brings laughter and whispers at the sight of her, definitely a cowboy style SAR probably a .45. Main use will be protection in the home, from wife and others :eek:, and protection when outdoors. I see so many and don't know what to choose. The price range I would like to stay in is $400 - $600. There's Uberti, Cimarron, Taylor's & Co., the Ruger Vaquero, and the Beretta Stampede to name a few that I've seen. Any or all would be great. Can some give some incite please? Thanks!

Uberti makes SA revolvers under a variety of names and for other gun companies and I wouldn't be surprised if they made all of the above, with the exception of Ruger. IIRC, they are owned by Beretta so that Stampede probably is made by Uberti. In manufacturing for other companies I think Uberti and the gun company decide on features and details like fit & finish and overall quality - then they start production. From what I've heard Cimarron & Taylor are very good.

I think the first decision is do you go with a conventional looking SA revolver and if so, I'd chose one with the original Colt internals a case hardened frame and blued cylinder/barrel. If you go with the modern style internals then that speaks to getting a new style Ruger Blackhawk with adjustable sights, blued or nickel or stainless finish.

I really can't develop a liking for the Vaquero. It's a great gun I know, but old style looks and a transfer bar action just don't work for me. I have a Ruger Super Blackhawk Hunter and it's a great gun, but I bought it for hunting carry and not for its looks or to get that SA feel. I have a Colt SAA and no doubt it's nice looking and authentic, but I'm not going to run around the woods with the darn thing and beat the heck out of it.

USFA makes old style SA revolvers (made in USA) and from what I've seen and heard they are very, very good.

jben
06-23-2009, 8:35 AM
I have a Ruger New Vaquero in .45 Colt. It's a great gun.
Whatever you choose, keep in mind there is a difference between the "old" Vaquero and the New Vaquero when it comes to reloading. The hot load data you'll find in reloading manuals that are specifically for Ruger Vaquero are for the "old" version. While still a very strong gun, the New Vaquero is a scaled down frame and will not be safe with the super hot loads people have worked up for the "old" Vaquero .45 colt.

john323
06-23-2009, 11:32 AM
Check out the Firingpin in Temple City. 626-444-2990 He has ALOT of SA cowboy guns. Tell Chuck I sent you. John

goathead
06-23-2009, 11:33 AM
Ruger first. Strong enough for very heavy loads

1++ think the ruger the way to go on saa

i had issues with the autos

slvrbulit12
06-23-2009, 12:19 PM
I have the USFA Rodeo in 45 Colt, with the 4 3/4 " barrel and love it. Built like a colt with the firing pin on the hammer and the same four clicks in the action and they are in your price range. If you would like to shoot one PM me and we could meet here in San Diego. I have two of them and may sell one.

The Rugers are also built well and would be another good option.

Electric Factory
06-23-2009, 12:29 PM
There are essentially two schools of thought when it comes to single action revolvers;

- Authentic/ Period Correct- As others have pointed out, Uberti is the name. Though there are several importers most of the guns are manufactured at the Uberti factory in Italy. In the c. 1800's catagory US Firearms Co/ USFA owns the ground in my opinion. VERY high quality shootin' irons, excellently finished and point of aim shooters from the factory. Most popular calibers 45LC, 44-40, 44 spcl, 38 spcl

-Modern- Again as others have already pointed out Ruger is pretty much 'go-to' here. They make strong, heavy steel frames designed to shoot modern ammo of all types, from .22 to 44Mag. If you want target sights, if you want to shoot heavy hunting loads, if you anticipate rough treatment for your revolver most would agree that Ruger is the way to go

Here's my USFA Single Action in 45LC
http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t57/electricfactory/100_1415.jpg
http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t57/electricfactory/WildBillHolster1.jpg

SBOldMan
06-23-2009, 7:17 PM
I have a Ruger Blackhawk .44 MAG...love it!

+1 for Ruger

Fjold
06-23-2009, 7:46 PM
I like single action revolvers since they are made for lefties. One other thing to consider is barrel length, the 7+" barrels look nice but the 4 1/2" - 5 1/2" are a lot handier to use.

Vacaville
06-23-2009, 8:25 PM
One of my first guns I bought was a Ruger Blackhawk in .357 mag, and it's probably still my favorite gun. They're built to last, and are relatively inexpensive (got mine used for $300). Great all around trail guns. If you want more power, get the .44 mag Super Blackhawk.

ivanimal
06-23-2009, 8:29 PM
Cant go wrong with a Colt Cowboy......


http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/ViewItem.asp?Item=132099538

http://www.pdmall.com/1/1/2/4109.jpg

ojisan
06-23-2009, 8:41 PM
It always struck me as odd that the old-time cowboy "six-shooters" were only loaded with 5 rounds for safety...so they are really " five-shooters".
A old timey Colt would be nice but too valuable and fragile and only 5 shots so...the Ruger New Vaquero in .45 Colt w/ 4 5/8" barrel fits the bill. Reasonable price, holds a full six rounds safely, never breaks (no elephant loads), points naturally so great for home defense, twirls and does tricks and no panic if it hits the floor.
New Model Super Blackhawk in .44 Mag or .45 Colt with 7" barrel for elephants and stuff.

sp_train_77
06-23-2009, 8:51 PM
You might check out US Firearms (USFA). They make a terrific copy of the Colt 1873 with modern metallurgy for hotter loads.

http://www.usfirearms.com/

BunnySlayer
06-23-2009, 10:17 PM
All the guns you listed are good stuff and would not get you laughed at on the range. Just as shooters the Rugers are probably the most practical. All the others are more historicaly correct but a bit more complicated to carry and should not be loaded to capacity as already stated here by others. Wyatt Earp BTW learned this the hard way with a very embarassing N.D. while getting up from a card game. His gun fell out of his pocket and went off. Maybe Bill Ruger was born a little too late!

1JimMarch
06-23-2009, 11:32 PM
Cant go wrong with a Colt Cowboy......

Oh yes you can! They were made with low-grade Italian parts and have a terrible reputation, worse than the Taurus Gaucho...which is also known for problems.

OK.

The single best deal out there right now is at CDNN:

http://www.cdnninvestments.com/dowournewcat.html - that links to their catalog.

THE killer deal is the 50th Anniversary 357 Blackhawk Flattop. This is more or less the same gun as the New Vaquero, in 357 of course and with adjustable sights, all-blue, 4.68" barrel. Page 16.

You can buy it as a two-pack with it's 44Magnum big brother, or each are available separately for under $400. Screamin' deal if you want adjustable sights.

But why do you want the 357 over the 44?

Two reasons:

* The mid-frame size Ruger single actions (basically the 50th Blackhawk 357, the New Vaquero and the Montado) are better-made than their larger cousins. Average accuracy is higher, cylinder dimensions are cleaner, there's no variances between bores as each bore is done one at a time in sequence with the same bit. Large-frame cylinders are drilled all-six-at-once and you do see variances between bores. When the mid-size frame Ruger SAs were revived in 2004 after being defunct since 1972, they re-did the way the guns were built, not just the gun designs themselves.

* The 50th Anniversary 44Mag has a flaw, in that they used the same smaller Colt SAA-sized grip frame as was really used by Ruger 50 years earlier on their first 44Magnum, and the same as is on the mid-frame guns listed above. Problem is, while the smaller plowhandle grip frame works just fine with moderate 45LC and even hot 357, it's just a bit much for most folk in terms of taming the 44Mag. True, some people are doing OK with it but others are disappointed with these and are retrofitting either the larger plowhandle grip frames from the SuperBlackhawks, or grafting on Ruger Bisley grip frames for better recoil control.

If you want fixed sights and basically a more "cowboy" look, you want a New Vaquero or the short-barrel Montado variant.

Full disclosure: I have a New Vaquero in 357 bought shortly after they came out (serial number just above 5,000). It's been a wonderful gun, now heavily modified with a SuperBlackhawk hammer, altered grip panels (rounded on the bottom for a "pinkie under" hold), spring kit and alarmingly radical sights like nothing else on the planet:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/1jimmarch/3617053759

It's my daily carry CCW in Tucson AZ and by far the best gun I've ever owned. And as funky as it may look it has everything else beat cold in the sights department, other than a set of real Goshen Enterprises Hexsites.

B Strong
06-24-2009, 4:58 AM
Oh yes you can! They were made with low-grade Italian parts and have a terrible reputation, worse than the Taurus Gaucho...which is also known for problems.

OK.

The single best deal out there right now is at CDNN:

http://www.cdnninvestments.com/dowournewcat.html - that links to their catalog.

THE killer deal is the 50th Anniversary 357 Blackhawk Flattop. This is more or less the same gun as the New Vaquero, in 357 of course and with adjustable sights, all-blue, 4.68" barrel. Page 16.

You can buy it as a two-pack with it's 44Magnum big brother, or each are available separately for under $400. Screamin' deal if you want adjustable sights.

But why do you want the 357 over the 44?

Two reasons:

* The mid-frame size Ruger single actions (basically the 50th Blackhawk 357, the New Vaquero and the Montado) are better-made than their larger cousins. Average accuracy is higher, cylinder dimensions are cleaner, there's no variances between bores as each bore is done one at a time in sequence with the same bit. Large-frame cylinders are drilled all-six-at-once and you do see variances between bores. When the mid-size frame Ruger SAs were revived in 2004 after being defunct since 1972, they re-did the way the guns were built, not just the gun designs themselves.

* The 50th Anniversary 44Mag has a flaw, in that they used the same smaller Colt SAA-sized grip frame as was really used by Ruger 50 years earlier on their first 44Magnum, and the same as is on the mid-frame guns listed above. Problem is, while the smaller plowhandle grip frame works just fine with moderate 45LC and even hot 357, it's just a bit much for most folk in terms of taming the 44Mag. True, some people are doing OK with it but others are disappointed with these and are retrofitting either the larger plowhandle grip frames from the SuperBlackhawks, or grafting on Ruger Bisley grip frames for better recoil control.

If you want fixed sights and basically a more "cowboy" look, you want a New Vaquero or the short-barrel Montado variant.

Full disclosure: I have a New Vaquero in 357 bought shortly after they came out (serial number just above 5,000). It's been a wonderful gun, now heavily modified with a SuperBlackhawk hammer, altered grip panels (rounded on the bottom for a "pinkie under" hold), spring kit and alarmingly radical sights like nothing else on the planet:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/1jimmarch/3617053759

It's my daily carry CCW in Tucson AZ and by far the best gun I've ever owned. And as funky as it may look it has everything else beat cold in the sights department, other than a set of real Goshen Enterprises Hexsites.


Jim, I've heard more different stories about the parts source on the Cowboy than you can shake a stick at - Germany, Canada, Italy - and more hearsay stories about their quality/durability/accuracy than I can remember.

I own one. I bought it used, I've shot the hell out of it (5K + rounds cowboy level leads) and it's never failed. It's reasonably accurate for the type, and for the price I paid for it at the time, I'd call it a cut above the Italian copies, and below the Rugers for strength.

If I found another at a reasonable ($500.00 M/L) price I'd buy another.

Hot Brass
06-24-2009, 5:52 AM
Ruger, I have a Super Black Hawk in 44 mag.

1JimMarch
06-24-2009, 7:49 AM
B Strong, we know that just before the Cowboy came out Colt started shipping black-powder open-top percussion revolvers (1851/1861 type) that WERE from Italy, no question. We're pretty sure those were Piettas that Colt did their own very nice finish on in-house. The overall quality of those weren't half bad.

Not long after, the Cowboy shipped. Given it's price and the fact that the metallurgy clearly wasn't up to Colt snuff, and that Colt had done business with Italy shortly before with the front-stuffers, the assumption pointed to Italy as a source.

This was also the period during which centerfire smokeless Italian guns just weren't holding up that well. Uberti got their act together in terms of basic metal quality around 10 years ago, not sure exactly when but that's ballpark close. And Uberti has long been the best of the Italians, rivaled only by Pietta and now lately by Armi Chiappa (but they're a newcomer). Armi San Marco stank but they're gone. The Colt Cowboy predates the period in which Uberti got it right.

Now. Shooting 5,000 "cowboy grade" 45LC loads is, I'm sorry, not a good test. Run a bunch of 20,000psi loads through it (hardcast 260s at 1,000fps, jacketed hollowpoint 200s at 1,100ish) and see what happens. Or get one chambered in 357 and crank a bunch off.

Under those conditions a Ruger of similar frame size (New Vaquero, Montado, 50th Anniversary 357 or the new limited-to-2,000 run of 44Spl Blackhawks) will be ticking fine when the "Colt" Cowboy is scrap metal.

And as a bonus, if we have no clue where it came from and Colt has long since stopped making it, how in hell are you gonna find parts? Remember, it's not totally Colt SAA compatible inside, it has a transfer bar ignition for starters meaning it's a LOT different under the hood. You can fix an Uberti with real Colt parts if you need to, from springs on up. Not so the Cowboy.

Army
06-24-2009, 10:06 AM
Personally...I like the firing pin on the hammer.

I had an early Vaquero in polished stainless and ivory grips, but couldn't get used to the hammer look. Sold it to a friend.

So, +1 on Uberti and USFA. I have a Uberti Sheriff 3" and full ejector rod, and two USFA Rodeo's. Great fit and function on all 3 (with the nod going to the USFA's), but I dearly love the little Uberti with its perfect balance and shooting ease in my hand. Ordered an El Paso Saddlery "John Wayne" holster and belt for it, and it carries like a comfortable old friend all day long while hiking or riding.

bwiese
06-24-2009, 10:15 AM
I second Jim's vote on the 357 Flattop 50th Anniversary revolver.

Beautiful, accurate gun, great trigger.

I wouldn't want that gripframe on 44Mag (though 44Spcl would be fine); I like the Bisley grip frame on the full-size Blackhawks for shooting hot(ter) loads - 45LC non-cowboy, 44Mag.

Also, this gun should fit in holsters designed for Colt SAA guns (as opposed to the larger/bulkier original Blackhawks).

1JimMarch
06-24-2009, 10:18 AM
I had an early Vaquero in polished stainless and ivory grips, but couldn't get used to the hammer look. Sold it to a friend.


See...I just don't get that :). To me, a flat-face hammer is fine. As a bonus, on a Ruger you can select how much "hammer reach" you want by swapping hammers - SuperBlackhawk takes it a bit lower (or this is the factory hammer on a Montado), Bisley lower yet. Adjustable ergonomics - way cool. Bisley hammer needs slight modification to work with a non-Bisley grip frame, SuperBlackhawk the way I went drops right in.

Electric Factory
07-21-2009, 6:35 PM
http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t57/electricfactory/100_7804.jpg
http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t57/electricfactory/UbertiSAA2.jpg

Electric Factory
07-21-2009, 7:40 PM
http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t57/electricfactory/ColtSAARig3-1.jpg

Rudolf the Red
07-21-2009, 8:52 PM
I've owned a .357 Blackhawk and it was great. As an FFL, I recently handled 3 Beretta .357 SA revolvers. All the heft was there. Even in the short bbl. Sheriff model. Also, the case coloring was really good looking. I liked them.

HeyZeus
07-22-2009, 3:29 AM
I own two Ruger single actions and two Taurus Gaucho ones. They both shoot nice. I shoot cowboy loads and normal loads out of the Taurus. The Ruger's get everything thru them. I am waiting on a three screw 357 mag convertible Blackhawk. I found it at a reasonable price. Look for one they can be had at a decent price. Read this article.

http://www.gunblast.com/Hamm_357-Flattop.htm

GM4spd
07-22-2009, 6:22 AM
Ruger's are strong,modern, and economical.If you want the feel of a real SA you
need a Colt or one of it's copies. If you want/need the look of an original SAA,the Ruger isn't what you want either. Pete

jazman
07-22-2009, 4:06 PM
Ruger. American made, very strong, smooth, gets the job done.

tankerman
07-22-2009, 5:03 PM
Here you go, they have what you're looking for;
http://www.emf-company.com/
Located in Santa Ana.

forgiven
07-22-2009, 5:18 PM
Welcome to the board. Go with the Ruger Blackhawk in .357mag. You won't be sorry.

WINGEDSWORD
07-22-2009, 9:45 PM
I have a Ruger old model Vaquero, A Ruger Blackhawk and A Colt SAA. All three are fine, but for someone new to single actions, I'd go with a Stainless Blackhawk, in .357. More versitile than the others.

1JimMarch
07-22-2009, 10:38 PM
Quoting Pete:

Ruger's are strong,modern, and economical.If you want the feel of a real SA you need a Colt or one of it's copies. If you want/need the look of an original SAA,the Ruger isn't what you want either.

That used to be true. The mid-frame Rugers like the New Vaquero and the 50th 357 Blackhawk are very SAA-esque in size and heft. Identical in size, a tad heavier, fit in the same holsters. They're not the oversize brutes Ruger was known for.

The standard Ruger Blackhawk 357 is a nice gun. It's built on a 44Magnum-class frame (since 1973) and is "overbuilt" for the caliber.

There is one exception: the 50th Anniversary 357 Flattop. It's built on a mid-size frame similar to the Colt SAA (or New Frontier). Average quality and accuracy is higher than with the large-frame variants, and it's still easily big enough to tame the nastiest 357 full house you can find. The cylinder is fatter and beefier than the Ruger GP100 or S&W L-frame (686, etc.) so it's no "weakling".

I have basically that gun, the Ruger New Vaquero in 357Mag - same thing 'cept for the sights, which in my case have been radically upgraded. These mid-frame Ruger SAs are some of the best guns Ruger has ever built.

You can still find the 357 50th Anniversary guns - in fact CDNN has some around $400, a screamin' deal. And since they're SA wheelguns longer than 7.5" you don't need to worry about the AG's approved handgun list.

RAMCHARGER
07-23-2009, 9:06 AM
I have a old model, 3 screw, blackhawk in .357 Magnum. Thats really all I need. I had several SA's in .45 but they never really grew on me like the .357 Three Screw BH.

I have have a Marlin lever action in .45 Colt so if I did ever get a SA in .45 I can only get a blackhawk or old model Vaquero since all my .45 loads are "carbine loads only" so I dont mix them up.

Kid Stanislaus
07-23-2009, 9:30 PM
A 250 gr. slug launched at a leisurly 750-850 fps has killed a lot of bad guys (and good guys too). I'd never hesitate to defend myself with a 45 LC loaded to medium velocities. The new Vaquero will do the job right nicely.

cal_gunner
09-13-2009, 8:39 AM
Question for those that own Rugers. Does the transfer bar rattle like their double action revolvers?

Argonaut
09-13-2009, 9:04 AM
I like single action revolvers since they are made for lefties. One other thing to consider is barrel length, the 7+" barrels look nice but the 4 1/2" - 5 1/2" are a lot handier to use.

I agree. less than 5" barrels and much handier and easier to carry. There is a little more sight radius with longer barrels but these are short range weapons anyway. The actual accuracy is no different. Of the guns you listed it is the Ruger hands down. The Italian guns look nice (like an Italian Woman) but even the high end Beretta's used to shoot loose on the Trap range. Uberti has worked hard to penetrate the market but I don't trust there heat treating. The older ones that I knew best frequently fit poorly but varied widely from gun to gun. Ruger's used to be really "clubby" feeling but always worked well and held up. The newer products look and feel great.

NotEnoughGuns
09-13-2009, 9:52 AM
I think the Ruger Blackhawk in 357 with the 9mm conversion cylinder would be a fine choice. Probably could get one new in your price range and you can shoot 357 mags 38 spl and 9mm out of one gun.

gunrun45
09-13-2009, 10:05 AM
+1 for anything in the way of a ruger single aciton. Their coil springs and overkill construction make them my "go-to" single action.
I am a convertable blackhawk fan. I own several in various calibers. The 45LC with 45ACP cylinder is a great deal.

1JimMarch
09-13-2009, 11:18 AM
Question for those that own Rugers. Does the transfer bar rattle like their double action revolvers?

Not near as much. A little bit sometimes.

In the Ruger SAs, the end of the base pin (the "axle" on which the cylinder spins) has a spring-mounted plunger on the end that goes into the action. This in turn pushes the transfer bar backwards so it can clear the side of the firing pin on the way up. As a bonus it solves almost all of the rattle.

Whenever cleaning a Ruger SA, check the plunger, make sure it's not sticking. If it does stick, symptom is, you can cock the gun with the barrel upwards because the transfer bar falls backwards off the firing pin by gravity. If you ever find your Ruger SA not cocking correctly, raise the muzzle and try again. Very unusual for this failure to occur but it can happen.

Bukowski
09-13-2009, 1:50 PM
I recently sold my other CAS guns and went exclusively with New Vaquero's in .357.

The others (Uberti/ Cimmeron etc.) looked great with the color case hardening and all but the Rugers just felt solid.

Totally subjective I know, but pick one up and shoot it, you'll see what I mean.

Timberline
09-13-2009, 4:57 PM
Many Ruger SA revolvers are not on the CA List... that I can determine, at least. For example, a New Blackhawk .357 is Ruger model No. BN-34L, which does not show on the Sturm, Ruger section of the List... :confused:

http://certguns.doj.ca.gov/safeguns.asp

NotEnoughGuns
09-13-2009, 5:11 PM
I think single actions are exempt from the list.

tEN wOLVES fIVE sHOOTER
09-13-2009, 5:14 PM
Here's my .02 worth, if your not going to shoot in CAS, I say the Ruger Blackhawk or Super Blackhawk, I like the 45 long Colt caliber, been shooting this cal. for close to fifty years now, if you get an old model Vaquero or one of the new Blackhawk offerings you will have everything you need, and you can still shoot in the modern class at CAS.

Regards

tEN wOLVES :)

1JimMarch
09-13-2009, 5:38 PM
Single action revolvers are exempt from the list SO LONG AS:

1) They hold at least five rounds.

2) Overall length is at least 7.5" measured end to end, PARALLEL to the barrel.

The latter means that a Bird's-Head gripped gun with a 3.5" barrel and SAA-class frame size might not make the length limit - likely one reason Ruger's Montado with a 3.5" barrel has a standard plowhandle grip.

22popnsplat
09-13-2009, 6:08 PM
I think i will speak up on this one , For most people i will suggest the blackhawk in .357 magnum .
I suggest the blackhawk for the simple reason The vaquero's fixed sights can be a bit of pain to regulate , and you are pretty much always going to have to shoot the same ammo
The 357 is a known excellent self defense round and is in most times easy to find , the 45 colt is a great round but I think its better suited to someone who reloads due to it can be more difficult to get.
I happen to have 3 rugers single actions in 45 colt and 2 double actions in 357, all good for their intended purpose

Timberline
09-13-2009, 9:55 PM
Single action revolvers are exempt from the list SO LONG AS:

1) They hold at least five rounds.

2) Overall length is at least 7.5" measured end to end, PARALLEL to the barrel.

The latter means that a Bird's-Head gripped gun with a 3.5" barrel and SAA-class frame size might not make the length limit - likely one reason Ruger's Montado with a 3.5" barrel has a standard plowhandle grip.

Thanks, I wondered about that, reading through Librarian's sticky here, but you've tied it together.

1JimMarch
09-13-2009, 10:03 PM
If it's not clear yet, the rules were set up to make sure mini-revolvers and derringers still needed the full monty certification.

supersonic
09-14-2009, 12:45 PM
Though a bit out of the price range you mentioned, it may be worth your while to check out a true SAA. After shopping around & test firing several 'clones,' I found the Colt to be an absolute dream to handle. The trigger is unbelievable right out of the box. I chose the 7.5" BBL & never looked back (hitting steel @ 100 yds. isn't even a challenge!:))
http://i205.photobucket.com/albums/bb181/giftedgiver/DSCN3239.jpg
http://i205.photobucket.com/albums/bb181/giftedgiver/DSCN3236.jpg

1JimMarch
09-14-2009, 5:39 PM
Several people I trust are of the opinion that the basic "full monty" version of the USFA priced at $900 is still a better gun than a Colt SAA.

NOT by the huge amount it was back around, say, eight years ago. At that time USFA was completely trouncing Colt's visible quality levels, with more or less identical metallurgy. At times the Italian guns also appeared to be better than Colt, except even Uberti has never matched Colt's metallurgy on their best day and Colt's worst. In other words, even most of the "bad" Colts can be mildly gunsmithed into something no Italian gun can ever match. (Note the "usually" - you sometimes see a real mutant freak of an SAA from the dark days of the mid to late '90s though....not so much today.)

Mind you, a moderately gunsmithed Ruger New Vaquero is more than capable of keeping up with a Colt, on a price-performance (meaning shooting performance!) basis. The result however won't hold it's value unless it's the work of a big-name smith like Linebaugh or Bowen...and even then not necessarily. (And no, a Gary Reeder usually isn't a good investment.)

Now, as a long-term investment, a Colt SAA might indeed have everything else beat, especially if "unfired and unturned". But where's the fun in that? A USFA will at a minimum still have a better sight channel and squared-true front sight versus a Colt, and almost certainly better springs. And enough Colts have been bought as "investments" and put away unfired by now that, well, I question whether you're likely to really get more value long-term out of a Colt SAA versus a good basic USFA with a "real" finish (as opposed to the Rodeo of course).

Remember: when times are bad, luxury items of any sort gun or otherwise lose value fastest.

I dunno. I think the real winner in high-end SAs that hold their value despite being shooters is Freedom Arms, due to their low production rates and incredible workmanship that just slaughters everything this side of a Korth.

My take: if you're going to hot-rod the hell out of it, esp. if you're going way outside of the CAS/SASS rulebook, get a Ruger, period unless you can afford an FA. If you want a CAS/SASS racegun, buy a USFA, Rodeo if you're on a budget, higher-end if you want. For "collector value"...meh...I'm not a collector so don't ask me. I *suspect* though that there's enough unfired/unturned-new-in-box Colt SAAs out there to fill demand for a GOOD long while - esp. if a lot of people all turn up broke at once, such as a real depression.

I think the gun that holds the most investment opportunities is the H&K P7 "lemonsqueezer" series. A good one in cherry condition and minty barrel is very likely to appreciate in value as both a collector and superb shooter.