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dagger10k
06-14-2009, 4:03 PM
I have 2 quick questions.

I got a new CZ75b in 40S&W as my first centerfire handgun. I like it quite well, and am getting used to it. I can't shoot it nearly as well as my Browning Buckmark yet, but I figure that may come in time.

1) I am using the "thumbs high" hold and the isosceles stance when I shoot. However, the muzzle rise always seems to want to pull the grip out of my support hand, like this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f-SG7sW9gPw
This makes it hard to get back on target quickly, since I have to re-adjust my grip every shot. In the videos I see where people shoot like this, usually this doesn't seem to happen. Does anyone know what I might be doing wrong?

2) I figure I should get some formal training at some point as well. Are there any good hangun training course/academies/whatever around either the Davis/Sacremento area or the Walnut Creek Area?

virulosity
06-14-2009, 4:12 PM
What do you mean by shoot as well? Are the groups bigger? It will take a bit longer to get back on target than a .22 if that is what you mean :)

Legasat
06-14-2009, 4:21 PM
.40 S&W Caliber does a similar thing to me (it's very snappy in it's recoil). Not as quick to get back on target from shot to shot. I'm sure I could learn to overcome it with lots of practice.

But instead, I chose to buy only 9mm & .45ACP. Much easier.

Just my $0.02

Greg-Dawg
06-14-2009, 4:28 PM
I shoot Glocks in .40S&W and I'm fine with getting back on target, using full metal jacket or jacket hollow points, in rapid fire sessions. Keeping at least 2 inch groupings.

Firm up your grip, start shooting at 3 yards and work your way out. You can always take a course in your local area. I use thumb over thumb and thumbs forward.

rino
06-14-2009, 4:45 PM
i shoot .40 in comps . im a novice and i think i do good with it . plus .40,a saiga 12 and a .308 it puts you in "major" class. very fun to shoot

GoodEyeSniper
06-14-2009, 5:46 PM
Are you familiar with the idea behind "push-pull" for gripping?

http://www.expertvillage.com/video/29867_guns-stance-push-pull.htm

I'm new to pistol shooting, and have a cz 75 compact .40, which should be snappier than your full size, and I don't have this problem. The act of pulling back with your support hand should keep it pretty firmly gripped.

dagger10k
06-14-2009, 9:01 PM
By not shooting as well, I meant that my groups are bigger, yes. :)

I understand the idea behind push pull shooting, but I thought it was something that was done more in weaver than isosceles. I grip the pistol pretty tight, but I can try pulling a bit with my support hand. Is that the normal way to shoot?

Anybody have any training they'd recommend?

Bagelthief
06-14-2009, 9:13 PM
yes, are there any good books/websites/videos that offer some good training on proper pistol and rifle shooting?

I understand taking formal "hands-on" classes are the best, but I also understand that they are expensive, and I just dont have that kind of income currently...

jinggoyd1967
06-14-2009, 9:57 PM
I'm not an expert in anyway but I do have suggestions.
-Grip the pistol as high as you can. The higher the grip the less the muzzle will jump.
-Grip the pistol as tight as you can without affecting your trigger finger motor skills.
-The push-pull idea is good keep doing that try to keep both thumbs pointing forward.
-Trying using a hard weaver stance. The weaver was developed for recoil control.
Good Luck and keep practicing.

SCMA-1
06-14-2009, 10:07 PM
You don't need to spend money to learn the basics.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oQgLmQl1zDw&feature=fvw

Watch USPSA Grand Master Todd Jarrett on pistol shooting:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ysa50-plo48

SCMA-1

dagger10k
06-14-2009, 10:14 PM
I've watched a lot of those videos and am trying to shoot the same way Todd Jarrett shoots, but it doesn't seem to be quite working out the same way as when he does it. That's why I am asking.

In the "how to grip a pistol" video, he says not to grip the handgun too tightly, so that's what I'm trying to do. I'm sure I might be able to control the recoil a bit better if I squeeze the handgun as hard as I can, but that doesn't seem right.

SCMA-1
06-14-2009, 10:28 PM
It could also be that the gripping surfaces on the CZ are too slick. Try the isometric grip control (push-pull) as previously mentioned, but at the same time adjust the gripping force of your two hands so that you are applying approximately 60% with your SUPPORT hand and 40% with your SHOOTING hand.

Additionally, your gripping surfaces on that CZ may be a bit slick (mine was). I changed my panels to a set of checkered rubber ones which seemed to help a bit.

SCMA-1

JTROKS
06-14-2009, 10:55 PM
I've watched a lot of those videos and am trying to shoot the same way Todd Jarrett shoots, but it doesn't seem to be quite working out the same way as when he does it. That's why I am asking.

In the "how to grip a pistol" video, he says not to grip the handgun too tightly, so that's what I'm trying to do. I'm sure I might be able to control the recoil a bit better if I squeeze the handgun as hard as I can, but that doesn't seem right.

Todd Jarrett shoots more than 50K rounds a year. I actually had a chance to listen to him talk during a big USPSA big match in the bay area, Golden Gate Championship during the mid '90s. With him shooting for Blackhawk and teaching classes he's probably shooting over 100K a year. He lives and breaths guns and shooting.

dagger10k
06-14-2009, 11:07 PM
I'll try adjusting my grip a bit. Gripping harder with my support hand and using the push pull. I guess I can just keep trying adjusting my grip until I find something that works well.

But it seems like slick grip panels wouldn't matter too much? My support hand is really only touching my shooting hand, not the grip panels. My main hand is not slipping at all when I shoot.

HCz
06-14-2009, 11:23 PM
While you can get tips from the internet or watch video, nothing substitutes good old actual experience. I'm not sure about your area, but if you can find a NRA certified or equivalent instructor, that would be my suggestion. Just a few hours can set you in the right direction.

dagger10k
06-15-2009, 10:44 PM
Anyone know of any places to learn around Davis or Walnut Creek?