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View Full Version : High cap rebuild kits...are they legal??


bubbapug1
05-13-2009, 3:27 PM
I sold a guy a 9mm ca legal carbine a while back, he seemed like he was on the up and up, but he had me write him out a bill of sale on the DROS form, and kept asking me if I had any high cap mags. He was a older gentlemen, about 68.

I sold him 2 - 10 rounds mags and 2 - 20 round mag rebuild kits because he claimed he had a house in Arizona and already owned a pistol with hi-Cap mags of the same type I had (unbuilt) in my possesion. The mags were fully disassembled when he took possesion of them and I explained to him they could only be used for rebuild purposes.

But he kept asking me if I had any more mags of high capacity, he asked me three times, which see off alarms in my head.

My question is, are the sale of high cap mag rebuild kits legal?

Secondly...does this sound like a sting operation to anyone??

ke6guj
05-13-2009, 3:28 PM
http://www.hoffmang.com/firearms/DOJ-large-cap-magazines-2005-11-10.pdf

oaklander
05-13-2009, 3:29 PM
They are perfectly legal. There is a letter floating around from the DOJ that says so. I don't have it handy, but someone will likely post it in this thread.

The big caveat is that you CAN'T make new mags out of the kits - you have to use them to rebuild your old mags (or use them out of state).

lorax3
05-13-2009, 3:35 PM
Take a look at the link above and also look and the following. (http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/showthread.php?t=124709&highlight=high+capacity)

That will explain everything you need to know.

bwiese
05-13-2009, 4:05 PM
The big caveat is that you CAN'T make new mags out of the kits - you have to use them to rebuild your old mags (or use them out of state).

One can also use these parts to build new mags that are permanently restricted to 10-round capacity. (And by 'permanently restricted', one should regard this as sufficient permanence such that any attempt to regain capacity well-nigh destroys the magazine or major components thereof.)

Sarkoon
05-13-2009, 5:09 PM
One can also use these parts to build new mags that are permanently restricted to 10-round capacity. (And by 'permanently restricted', one should regard this as sufficient permanence such that any attempt to regain capacity well-nigh destroys the magazine or major components thereof.)

I thought the legal definition of "permanent" in this regard meant that one must not be able to modify the magazine to accept more than 10 rounds without disassembly being required. Otherwise, how would the 10/20 PMAG instructions be legal if one could disassemble the magazine, break off the epoxied rod (or just replace the follower) then put it back together again?

Vtec44
05-13-2009, 5:11 PM
I thought the legal definition of "permanent" in this regard meant that one must not be able to modify the magazine to accept more than 10 rounds without disassembly being required. Otherwise, how would the 10/20 PMAG instructions be legal if one could disassemble the magazine, break off the epoxied rod (or just replace the follower) then put it back together again?



As far as the definition of "permanent", on page #9 of this document (http://66.117.10.18/Docs/ASSAULT%20WEAPONS/Cal%20Regulations/NRA-HuntPDecOfIgnatiusChinn061205.PDF) has a good explanation. Given the time and enough tools, anything is reversable.