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wuhungsix
05-12-2009, 10:36 AM
I have done numerous PPT in the past as a seller and buyer. I am actually scheduled to meet a calgunner today to transfer. I never really gave it much thought until lately. Then a question popped up.
During the proccess of the transfer, is the gun foresale checked by the FFL or DOJ to see if it is stolen or indeed registered to the seller?
I wouldn't want to be the buyer who payed hard earned cash for a gun and ends up being SOL because the seller did not legally own the gun. I understand that the seller's info is all recorded but it would be a pain to have to go to court get your money back.

wuhungsix
05-12-2009, 10:45 AM
nevermind I JUST saw the thread "How do I know I am buying from the right guy". When I did a search I didn't plug in any of the KEY words.

fuegoslow
05-12-2009, 10:47 AM
Yes, that is cause for concern. I remember reading a thread here where a buyer went through the 10 wait period only to find out the gun was reported stolen. The buyer was at a loss for the purchase and the gun itself was confiscated. I don't recall what the outcome was in regards to the seller.

As you're well aware, the buyer has to provide I'd and fingerprint. That's how my PPT's are handled.

Shane916
05-12-2009, 11:14 AM
Besides the obvious criminal ramifications on the seller. The buyer would essentially recover the money via a civil case.

Miltiades
05-12-2009, 11:54 AM
I'll give odds that a stolen gun doesn't often go through the PPT process. I think that even the dullest gun thief would see the risk in transferring a gun on the DOJ paperwork and showing his identification. It seems much more likely that a gun thief would sell his product in a cash transaction to a buyer who knows the gun is stolen, rather than through PPT.

Shane916
05-12-2009, 1:26 PM
I'll give odds that a stolen gun doesn't often go through the PPT process. I think that even the dullest gun thief would see the risk in transferring a gun on the DOJ paperwork and showing his identification. It seems much more likely that a gun thief would sell his product in a cash transaction to a buyer who knows the gun is stolen, rather than through PPT.

Very true. I suppose an unknowing person transferring a gun could possess the gun not knowing that it's stolen. More or less obtaining the gun as a likely recipient from an estate or obtaining it via a non-FFL transfer prior to such laws enacted requiring such.