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halifax
05-09-2009, 4:23 AM
I heard from by BIL in Oregon that a CHL (CCW) instructor up there is telling his students that when visiting in CA, a CA sheriff can issue a temporary CCW to them if they show their CHL. Mind you, these aren't LEOs.

Ever heard of a temporary non-resident CCW?

tango-52
05-09-2009, 5:54 AM
There is no such thing. Somebody was misinformed. :rolleyes:

halifax
05-09-2009, 6:07 AM
I heard from by BIL in Oregon that a CHL (CCW) instructor up there is telling his students that when visiting in CA, a CA sheriff can issue a temporary CCW to them if they show their CHL. Mind you, these aren't LEOs.

Ever heard of a temporary non-resident CCW?

Since posting this, I have been thinking about it more (dangerous, I know), but here is a hypothetical:

If a non-resident visitor asks the sheriff for permission to carry concealed while visiting his county, can the sheriff, as chief law enforcement officer in the county, grant the request?

Not really a CCW permit but more of a permission slip.

Sobriquet
05-09-2009, 6:15 AM
I'm sure Librarian will probably post the exact language, but IIRC the PC section dealing with CCW issuance states that the applicant must be a resident of the county for which they're applying.

tango-52
05-09-2009, 6:24 AM
I'm sure Librarian will probably post the exact language, but IIRC the PC section dealing with CCW issuance states that the applicant must be a resident of the county for which they're applying.

Here it is:

CA Penal Code 12050 (a) (1) ...
(D) For the purpose of subparagraph (A), the applicant shall
satisfy any one of the following:
(i) Is a resident of the county or a city within the county.
(ii) Spends a substantial period of time in the applicant's
principal place of employment or business in the county or a city
within the county.

Note that for the employment one, it is only good for 90 days. It is my understanding that these arerarely, if ever, issued.

Untamed1972
05-09-2009, 7:47 AM
Since posting this, I have been thinking about it more (dangerous, I know), but here is a hypothetical:

If a non-resident visitor asks the sheriff for permission to carry concealed while visiting his county, can the sheriff, as chief law enforcement officer in the county, grant the request?

Not really a CCW permit but more of a permission slip.

Not to mention if word got out to the residents of his county the he was allowing out-of-staters to carry when he wont issue to his own residents he'd be opening himself up for all kinds negative attention.

DDT
05-09-2009, 8:26 AM
It's important to know that 12050(a)(1)(ii) permits are only valid for 90 days.

Librarian
05-09-2009, 11:16 AM
I'm sure Librarian will probably post the exact language,
Not at bleedin' 0715! :chris:

Sobriquet
05-09-2009, 4:54 PM
Not at bleedin' 0715! :chris:

You mean you sleep? I thought you were a PC quoting, case law citing cyborg from the future sent back in time to help restore civil rights to law-abiding Californians.

yellowfin
05-09-2009, 6:13 PM
The non resident business one may only be for 90 days and temporary, but it does not specify at all that it can't be for Oregon, Nevada, and Arizona residents who work in CA, nor does it specify that multiple consecutive permits can't be processed. Just getting a few people started with that would be useful precedent.

bohoki
05-09-2009, 7:07 PM
they are all temporary

Glock22Fan
05-09-2009, 7:09 PM
The non resident business one may only be for 90 days and temporary, but it does not specify at all that it can't be for Oregon, Nevada, and Arizona residents who work in CA, nor does it specify that multiple consecutive permits can't be processed. Just getting a few people started with that would be useful precedent.

Takes up to a year or more to issue, lasts 90 days, sets the same standards (except residency) as an ordinary CCW and costs as much as a full (2 year) CCW.

Anyone surprised I've never actually heard of one being issued? Has anyone ever heard of one being issued?

eltee
05-09-2009, 7:46 PM
Don't know it they still do this. Don't know if it was legal then, or now. Remember, within a county the Sheriff has alot of clout, and if the D.A. agrees not to pursue something then people can (and did) "get away" with all sorts of stuff.

When I was beginning my cop career, a chief within a city or a sheriff in an unincorporated area, etc. would issue informal CCW's out of their offices. It ranged from a chief's / sheriff's business card with some wording and a signature to a letter to an actual card. This was back in the days of the "courtesy cards" (now forbidden by law in Calif). A sheriff's business card with, "OK to carry concealed 01/01/67-04/15/67. (signed) Sheriff Lobo" was fairly common to see. These were often done to accomodate bodyguards of VIPs, etc.

Also, chiefs could issue permits (not a statewide card as used now) for P.I.'s, security types, etc. that were honored.

Once I worked accompanying rare coins out of state as an off duty gig. This was WAY before HR218, etc. The person who organized the coin show made some calls and I was given permission to carry concealed for the duration of my job.

Another workaround was that the Sheriff or Chief could "deputize" someone and make them a "special" officer or deputy with an ID card allowing CCW. They used to do this for bonafide reasons and for VIPs and celebrities. I once compiled a list of old time actors who had special officer/deputy status (mostly honorary) that also permitted CCW.

But that was then, and this is now. I know, for a fact, that local governments often do what they want even if the written law prohibits it. A retired governor once had a security unit (civilians) that were authorized to carry guns and have red lights and sirens on their privately owned vehicles. They were eventually required to comply when someone in the CHP made it public. When I was a new cop, old salts had full auto war trophy subs in the trunks of the cars with the blessing of the chief, mayor and DA. The M2 carbines were very popular.

Now...:confused:

halifax
05-09-2009, 9:18 PM
Don't know it they still do this. Don't know if it was legal then, or now. Remember, within a county the Sheriff has alot of clout, and if the D.A. agrees not to pursue something then people can (and did) "get away" with all sorts of stuff.

When I was beginning my cop career, a chief within a city or a sheriff in an unincorporated area, etc. would issue informal CCW's out of their offices. It ranged from a chief's / sheriff's business card with some wording and a signature to a letter to an actual card. This was back in the days of the "courtesy cards" (now forbidden by law in Calif). A sheriff's business card with, "OK to carry concealed 01/01/67-04/15/67. (signed) Sheriff Lobo" was fairly common to see. These were often done to accomodate bodyguards of VIPs, etc.

Also, chiefs could issue permits (not a statewide card as used now) for P.I.'s, security types, etc. that were honored.

Once I worked accompanying rare coins out of state as an off duty gig. This was WAY before HR218, etc. The person who organized the coin show made some calls and I was given permission to carry concealed for the duration of my job.

Another workaround was that the Sheriff or Chief could "deputize" someone and make them a "special" officer or deputy with an ID card allowing CCW. They used to do this for bonafide reasons and for VIPs and celebrities. I once compiled a list of old time actors who had special officer/deputy status (mostly honorary) that also permitted CCW.

But that was then, and this is now. I know, for a fact, that local governments often do what they want even if the written law prohibits it. A retired governor once had a security unit (civilians) that were authorized to carry guns and have red lights and sirens on their privately owned vehicles. They were eventually required to comply when someone in the CHP made it public. When I was a new cop, old salts had full auto war trophy subs in the trunks of the cars with the blessing of the chief, mayor and DA. The M2 carbines were very popular.

Now...:confused:

On the fly CCW! Makes sense to me. I do wonder if it's still practiced.

Sobriquet
05-09-2009, 11:06 PM
On the fly CCW! Makes sense to me. I do wonder if it's still practiced.

Sure, but you need to join the Church of Scientology and make a check out to Baca. ;)

leitung
05-09-2009, 11:22 PM
I know a Bounty Hunter that told me that he could get a temp CCW when out looking for fugitive.