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View Full Version : Safe to do a single-shot pistol for personal conversion?


akguy999
05-06-2009, 10:34 PM
Recently, I was talking with a dealer who handles a lot of OL stuff in So Cal. Regarding single-shot NERFs, this person said that he was not sure how this was going to go, and that he cautioned against buying anything along these lines in the near future. According to him, his store would not handle such items until legal clarification materializes.

What do the CG sages think of this? Is it legal to get an MPA and convert on one's own to a semi-automatic? How defensible is this behavior?

domokun
05-06-2009, 10:38 PM
NERFs are on hold right now.

DDT
05-06-2009, 10:38 PM
AFAIK you can DROS a single shot MPA or any other single shot handgun. This is not a NeRF. Find an FFL that will help you out.

Once you have the firearm DROSed it is perfectly legal for you to convert it to semi-auto. Just stay away from mags with more than 10 rounds.

oaklander
05-06-2009, 10:49 PM
NeRF's are different than the "single-shot exemption."

# 12133. [. . .](b) The provisions of this chapter shall not apply to a single-shot pistol with a barrel length of not less than six inches and that has an overall length of at least 10 1/2 inches when the handle, frame or receiver, and barrel are assembled.

jamesob
05-06-2009, 11:20 PM
not to thread jack but if i was to purchase a rra lar-15 stripped lower and my dealer logged in and out on 4473 as "other" could I assemble it myself as a single shot and be drosed as a single shot exemption? since it would be logged out as other on the 4473 there would not be mfg. on the dealers part and i designated it as a exempt single shot pistol?

domokun
05-06-2009, 11:25 PM
not to thread jack but if i was to purchase a rra lar-15 stripped lower and my dealer logged in and out on 4473 as "other" could I assemble it myself as a single shot and be drosed as a single shot exemption? since it would be logged out as other on the 4473 there would not be mfg. on the dealers part and i designated it as a exempt single shot pistol?

NO. The issue is it isn't on the roster and hence it didn't come in via legal means as a pistol. For a single-shot pistol exemption, the firearm must be a complete and working single shot pistol when DROS'd. Additionally, DROS occurs when you file the 4473 not afterwards, it's either a pistol, long gun or other.