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Requiem
03-27-2009, 5:19 PM
Hello, fellow CalGunners. I have been thinking for a long time about getting into the gun business as a career, and I want to know what it takes to get started and ultimately what to focus on. My dream is to work on more modern firearms (AR's etc.) and their accessories. I honestly would love to get started by working for a small up-and-coming company with great services doing what I love: working with guns. However, I imagine companies such as that would not hire the young guy with little to no experience in the community other than his own personal firearm modifications and shooting his own guns. Which is the reason I'm looking into an online gunsmithing program at Penn Foster (http://www.pennfoster.edu/gunsmith/index.html)to see if this will help get me started in the right direction. Am I looking in the wrong places, or what? Where and how can I get started. I really want to get into a business and community that I have passion for.

I appreciate any and all suggestions,
-Brian

rkt88edmo
03-27-2009, 5:39 PM
I am prety sure that if you are young and work cheap and can learn you can get hired.

wcnones
03-27-2009, 6:28 PM
Strangely enough, I am thinking about starting a small up-and-coming firearms company.

remington
03-29-2009, 8:03 PM
I have attended a few courses at Lassen Community College in Susanville, about 1 hour north of Reno. They have a great reputation and the cost is community college $$. I used RK Enterprises in Santa Barbara to obtain my FFL as a home based business. In Corona plan on about $700 to get licensed and about 6 Months.

Good luck.

Scold
03-29-2009, 11:13 PM
I've sold guns for about 10 years off and on. The most important thing I can tell you is that before you open your doors, become ABSOLUTELY crystal clear about all of the firearm laws, both state and federal.
Also.... learn all you can about firearms you are not interested in. Just because you don't like them doesn't mean a customer with lots of green doesn't. I know more about firearms that I will never own than I care to think about.... but every little bit helps.

And probably the one thing that will either make or break you.... HAVE A GOOD ATTITUDE. I really..... really hate the feeling I get in a lot of shops where it's like I'm just annoying the salesman. I try to make the customer feel at home, and especially beginners (remember.... beginners don't own any firearms yet, and you don't know how deep their pockets are. If you treat them well they will buy mostly from you)


Anyways... if you have any other questions feel free to PM me.

Josh3239
03-30-2009, 2:35 AM
I wanted to do that when I get older as well. Some of the skills I think that would be neat to have is go to a school that will teach welding, CNC, other types of machining, and take a workshop on duracoat. Colt, Glock, and other companies offer workshops on how to operate and gunsmith their rifles. It would be also helpful to find someone who builds ARs, AKs, FALs, etc and have them teach you how to do it. Learning to anodize, parkerize, and do barrel work would be very helpful skills to have.

Travis8128
03-31-2009, 8:03 PM
I've sold guns for about 10 years off and on. The most important thing I can tell you is that before you open your doors, become ABSOLUTELY crystal clear about all of the firearm laws, both state and federal.
Also.... learn all you can about firearms you are not interested in. Just because you don't like them doesn't mean a customer with lots of green doesn't. I know more about firearms that I will never own than I care to think about.... but every little bit helps.

And probably the one thing that will either make or break you.... HAVE A GOOD ATTITUDE. I really..... really hate the feeling I get in a lot of shops where it's like I'm just annoying the salesman. I try to make the customer feel at home, and especially beginners (remember.... beginners don't own any firearms yet, and you don't know how deep their pockets are. If you treat them well they will buy mostly from you)


Anyways... if you have any other questions feel free to PM me.

I have never run or worked at a gun store but i go frequently.

And i have to say he is 110% right.

I really think attitude is the deciding factor that can make or break a gun store/ or just being an employee in general. I have gone to gun stores where people think they are 10 times smarter than you and what they say is law. You know the type that think nothing they say is FUD when 99% of it is.But on the other hand I feel like i almost want to come back and buy things from store owners/employees that are enjoyable. You SHOULD know everything and know more than the customer but dont let it show unless they ask for your wisdom. Other wise its just damn annoying

-Travis

Requiem
04-01-2009, 8:20 AM
Gentleman I appreciate your information and responses but my stated goal was NOT to open up my own business but rather to get hired by one. I'm only 18 right now so starting my own gun business is a impractical dream at this point. Maybe somewhere down the road. I am seriously considering doing the Penn Foster Gunsmith program and I'm wondering if their diploma will actually get me somewhere so I can work for a gunsmith or store as some type of apprentice.

BLACK LION
04-06-2009, 11:53 AM
some great points above...especially with the duracoat and parkerizing becuase you dont need to be a smith or have access to a cache of firearms to start this and get good at it.
I say ditch the Penn foster bs. I went that route with Private investigation and I would have wasted 1200.00 bucks for squat. I found out that 3 years at my current job automatically qualified me and all I needed to do was fill out an app-pass a test and pay some fees.

I would say to get a job at a gun shop becuase then you can get your hands on and fiddle with an array of firearms of all shapes -sizes and calibers. Then maybe spend some time around the smith of the shop and see if he accept you as an apprentice. Then maybe take a few armorers courses on some popular models like glock-1911-xd-ak-fal-ar15-mini-14-sks-mossberg and remington shotguns... etc

First get your hands on some and the only way to do that is at the shop. You cant learn to work on something that you dont have..wether you own it or one is dontated or one is in for service. You can start with basic field stripping until it becomes routine then move on. You dont need to be a gunsmith to field strip a firemearm but its definatley a start.

cheers