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View Full Version : Where to keep you home defense weapons?


2012Survivalist
02-18-2009, 10:15 AM
Hey all i've been wondering where most of you keep your home defense weapons. I have small children so that's a big issue, so I've been having a hard time trying to figure out how to keep it accessible enough to get to it in an emergency, and to keep it away from my children's reach..... I have a pistol and a shotgun, currently got them locked up high in my closet but it seems like its going to take to long to get to them if someone broke it and rushed my bedroom..... What are you suggestions ?:confused:

Soldier415
02-18-2009, 10:25 AM
They have a simple rack, forget the name but you screw it into the wall at whatever height you want. It has a tensioned clamp that holds a shotgun. High enough to be out of kids reach, but all you have to do is grab and pull if something goes bump in the night.

Without breaking opsec on my home setup. I keep a loaded gun within relatively easy reach in each area of my place.

If i'm sitting on the couch and someone kicks my door in, and my HD gun is on the nightstand...wrong answer.

will227457
02-18-2009, 10:27 AM
I do not currently have children so it is not an issue for me, I have put some thought in to this because my wife and I will be starting a family soon.

1. leave the shotgun locked up during the day only bring it out at night and put it by your night stand, I would hope your children are not sneaking into your room at night while you are sleeping, lock it up in the morning.

2. Carry your pistol on your person while you are in the house, and when you get home from work. Lock it up while you are out of the house. This way the gun is always in your posession, and cannot fall into the hands of a child or visitor.

take this with a grain of salt as I do not currently have kids and do not know the dynamic in your home......

Capt. Speirs
02-18-2009, 10:28 AM
Hey all i've been wondering where most of you keep your home defense weapons. I have small children so that's a big issue, so I've been having a hard time trying to figure out how to keep it accessible enough to get to it in an emergency, and to keep it away from my children's reach..... I have a pistol and a shotgun, currently got them locked up high in my closet but it seems like its going to take to long to get to them if someone broke it and rushed my bedroom..... What are you suggestions ?:confused:

I got news for you, if they rushed your bedroom while you are sleeping, you aren't going to do much even if you sleep with gun in hand.

Keep a handgun by your head in a locked box that opens very quickly like those finger combinations. Mind you the box will only keep small children away from the gun, a thief will be able to open it in less than 10 seconds, unless someone found a better one on the market than I did.

tmuller
02-18-2009, 10:29 AM
You can find small handgun safes but for your shotgun you might be SOL.

http://images.cabelas.com/is/image/cabelas/s7_229295_imageset_01?$main-Large$

ETA: the one pictures is available at Cabela's for around $75, you can find less expensive ones too.

paintballergb
02-18-2009, 10:42 AM
Perhaps something like this under a nightstand, behind a head board, etc.

http://quickdrawgunmagnets.com/

Capt. Speirs
02-18-2009, 10:47 AM
Perhaps something like this under a nightstand, behind a head board, etc.

http://quickdrawgunmagnets.com/

And the safety of his children?

paintballergb
02-18-2009, 10:57 AM
And the safety of his children?

Well obviously put it some where they can't reach it. If he wants true safety then locked up is the ONLY way to go.

Sam
02-18-2009, 11:10 AM
2. Carry your pistol on your person while you are in the house, and when you get home from work. Lock it up while you are out of the house. This way the gun is always in your posession, and cannot fall into the hands of a child or visitor.



I get to come home with it on! Sorry, had to brag. Anyway, I like the gunvault series and I currently am using the Ft. Knox handgun safe. It's pretty heavy duty, but really just stops the smash and grab type burglars. I have no ideas about long gun storage.

SanSacto
02-18-2009, 11:16 AM
I do not have children, but I do have roommates. Because of that I keep a pistol on my desk and a AK leaning behind my bookshelf, both unloaded. I do not keep a loaded mag in either, although I do have loaded mags out of sight but quickly accessible.

paintballergb
02-18-2009, 11:32 AM
What about a wall safe. Cut a hole in the drywall, screw it to your studs from the inside and you'll have yourself a secure weapon right next to your bed and no chance of someone running off with your safe.

fishmaniac
02-18-2009, 11:32 AM
Just get a nice bedroom door lock and you can keep bedroom rushing perps and nosy, curious kids out.

Regardless, you should always leave guns locked up 24/7 when kids are around. It's the right thing to do. :thumbsup:

sorensen440
02-18-2009, 11:43 AM
Its simple really
keep them locked up when your away and carry while your home

maxicon
02-18-2009, 11:45 AM
With kids, there is only one responsible option, IMO. You have to keep them locked up in whatever ready state works for you.

Hiding stuff from kids or roommates is a disaster waiting to happen. Even if you train your kids well, they have friends who might get into things. Hoping they won't find dangerous gear - well, you know what they say about hope.

Handguns are easy - use a Gunvault or something similar. Fast, easy access, keeps kids out until they're old enough to use a prybar (and hopefully they've got the appropriate values not to by then), and California certified as a lockbox.

I prefer the Gunvault because it's very fast, easy to work in the dark (try that with the 12 key pad posted above), and the door opens out of your way. Downsides are the electronic lock and that you can lock yourself out of it if you don't practice fumble recovery.

Others prefer boxes based on the mechanical Simplex lock, which is reliable but slightly more complicated to use. It's a matter of personal preference -try both, and practice, practice, practice.

Keep a hand held light either next to the lockbox or in it. A light on your gun is good, but you don't want to be pointing your gun at noises in the night to identify them if you've got kids - one of the basic rules of gun safety.

For long guns, it's harder - they need to be ready and locked, and that's not as easy as with handguns. There have been products to lock them on the wall, but some families are uncomfortable with guns displayed in the open. Other options are to lock them in a closet, but whatever you choose, you have to be able to get into it quickly.

Again, you need a light, but with a long gun, you're hampered by the fact that both hands are full, and you're back to pointing your gun at what you want to identify. Also, if you want to get your kids into one room (like your bedroom) at 3 am, they're going to be groggy and sleepy, and you'll need a hand free to help them along, or even carry them.

My recommendation is to practice at night with the lights out, using your various weapons of choice. Pretend you're bringing a 2 and 4 year old back to your room, where your wife is on the phone to 911, while checking that the various doors you pass by don't have bad guys hanging out nearby.

There are a lot of choices to make, and many of them are personal decisions. Practice, read up on techniques, and take some classes on home defense if possible.

2012Survivalist
02-18-2009, 11:52 AM
Great suggestions everyone thx, I think that small pistol/gun safe in my nightstand is the best answer for me, and i guess ill just keep the shotgun unloaded at the top of my closet for now, when the kids get older ill probably have to lock it up, Hopefully my dog will wakemeup/ buy me enough time to get to them, I don't expect anyone other than a trained assassin to be able to get all the way to my bedroom without me hearing anything anyway ;)

99sparks
02-18-2009, 11:56 AM
Great suggestions everyone thx, I think that small pistol/gun safe in my nightstand is the best answer for me, and i guess ill just keep the shotgun unloaded at the top of my closet for now, when the kids get older ill probably have to lock it up, Hopefully my dog will wakemeup/ buy me enough time to get to them, I don't expect anyone other than a trained assassin to be able to get all the way to my bedroom without me hearing anything anyway ;)
Have a rack mounted over the top of the closet door on the inside. Works for me but I am relatively tall.

fusionstar
02-18-2009, 12:09 PM
1.) have a guard dog.
2.) have a shotgun within 3 seconds reach.
3.) have a handgun within a seconds reach.

Theres no small children in my home and everyone is trained with firearms. I just leave mines in the closet behind some clothing. Not loaded but rounds ready. If you have kids, put it under or over something they cant move. Keep it unloaded. You can make a locking gun rack, but how fast can you unlock it. Like a clam shell lock that can house your emergency weapons. And hide the key somewhere high and tape it down.

Or.. get a combination lock, set all numbers but leave 1 or 2.. and just turn to it when you need it. peoples first instinct when confronted with a combo lock is to turn it.. which of course scrambles it :D

xxdabroxx
02-18-2009, 12:30 PM
first thing i do at a combo lock is turn one number at a time, people are lazy when it comes to combo locks.

Back O.T.: I keep mine under the bed when at home, and until my gunvault that i ordered today comes in, its hiding behind something, in its case, in an obscure location.

audihenry
02-18-2009, 12:55 PM
I do not currently have children so it is not an issue for me, I have put some thought in to this because my wife and I will be starting a family soon.

1. leave the shotgun locked up during the day only bring it out at night and put it by your night stand, I would hope your children are not sneaking into your room at night while you are sleeping, lock it up in the morning.

2. Carry your pistol on your person while you are in the house, and when you get home from work. Lock it up while you are out of the house. This way the gun is always in your posession, and cannot fall into the hands of a child or visitor.

take this with a grain of salt as I do not currently have kids and do not know the dynamic in your home......

I mean this without meaning to offend, but you call that a life?

Fate
02-18-2009, 1:54 PM
1. leave the shotgun locked up during the day only bring it out at night and put it by your night stand, I would hope your children are not sneaking into your room at night while you are sleeping, lock it up in the morning.

I see you said you don't have kids, but are planning to. You might have to rethink your plan. Kids WILL come into your room in the middle of the night. They're quiet and know the lay of the land too, so don't be surprised if you don't hear anything until awakened by small fingers prying open your eyes as they say, "Da Da, awake?"

Back to the OP: I have firearms within 2-5 seconds reach throughout the house. Still carry whenever the front screen door is open for ventilation. No, I'm not paranoid. Had someone kick in my front door on Christmas Day a few years ago when we were obviously home (lights, music, etc.) They fled when I shouted, "I've got a gun!" Police were less than useless.

Edge
02-18-2009, 1:54 PM
I'm sorry, but unless you're single, no kids, and don't have any friends/girlfriends over ever it's not very practical to carry around the house.
With children in the house it just doesn't seem practical to me to keep a shotgun loaded anywhere you could have quick access.
My wife and I have a gunvault on the nightstand and I think that would work very well for us. It takes 2 sec. to get into it and it's kid safe.
Protecting your family is important, but many more children are wounded/killed by firearms that they have gained access to then by someone breaking into the house.

Edge
02-18-2009, 2:08 PM
Or.. get a combination lock, set all numbers but leave 1 or 2.. and just turn to it when you need it. peoples first instinct when confronted with a combo lock is to turn it.. which of course scrambles it :D

Sorry, but I have a big problem with this one too. I have a 2 yo daughter who has figured out how to do things with my computer, cell phone, whatever, that I can't do, and she's able to do them consistently. I have no doubt that if she had access to a combo lock with only the last number or two to figure out to open it, she'd have it down in a day and remember how to do it.

Midian
02-18-2009, 2:11 PM
We don't have kids, don't plan on it, and kids are rarely in our house. What I'd like to do is convert my bedside drawer with either pick N pluck foam or some other medium and make a custom niche for a 1911. Possibly even rig a small LED that lights when the drawer is opened. Just open the drawer and there she is.

fusionstar
02-18-2009, 2:12 PM
Sorry, but I have a big problem with this one too. I have a 2 yo daughter who has figured out how to do things with my computer, cell phone, whatever, that I can't do, and she's able to do them consistently. I have no doubt that if she had access to a combo lock with only the last number or two to figure out to open it, she'd have it down in a day and remember how to do it.

then scramble it all :P

sorensen440
02-18-2009, 2:13 PM
You need to teach your kids to have a healthy respect (not fear) for firearms.
I remember knowing where my dad kept a loaded revolver when I was very young but I also knew not to touch it

rayra
02-18-2009, 2:32 PM
I'm sorry, but unless you're single, no kids, and don't have any friends/girlfriends over ever it's not very practical to carry around the house.
With children in the house it just doesn't seem practical to me to keep a shotgun loaded anywhere you could have quick access.
My wife and I have a gunvault on the nightstand and I think that would work very well for us. It takes 2 sec. to get into it and it's kid safe.
Protecting your family is important, but many more children are wounded/killed by firearms that they have gained access to then by someone breaking into the house.

Might as well have been cut and pasted from the Brady website. Go ahead and try to prove that. And when you get done filtering thru the FBI and CDC statistical data, you come back here with a report showing how more infants / toddlers DROWN IN THEIR OWN HOMES, than are hurt or killed by firearms.

rayra
02-18-2009, 2:34 PM
We don't have kids, don't plan on it, and kids are rarely in our house. What I'd like to do is convert my bedside drawer with either pick N pluck foam or some other medium and make a custom niche for a 1911. Possibly even rig a small LED that lights when the drawer is opened. Just open the drawer and there she is.

Just mount a holster to the inner side of the drawer face. Lots of easy methods, velcro, snaps, epoxies. Position it any way you need to facilitate an easy draw from in bed.

sorensen440
02-18-2009, 2:41 PM
Might as well have been cut and pasted from the Brady website. Go ahead and try to prove that. And when you get done filtering thru the FBI and CDC statistical data, you come back here with a report showing how more infants / toddlers DROWN IN THEIR OWN HOMES, than are hurt or killed by firearms.
My thoughts exactly

packnrat
02-18-2009, 2:47 PM
Close at hand at all times.

chiefcrash
02-18-2009, 2:57 PM
I'm gonna have to say BAD PLAN on the "hide it out of reach" idea. I remember since I was 5, the only way to keep me out of something was to lock it up. I was a resourcful and curious little bugger. I could easily get stuff from top of closets, top of the fridge, the loft, anywhere.

I don't have kids, but what I do have is a bi-polar mother in law. As you can imagine, she can NOT have access to my firearms. Stashing pistols isn't that big of a problem (a locked drawer, Gunvault, etc), but I have been wondering if there's anything that might do for my shotgun...

covertcombatant
02-18-2009, 2:58 PM
My night stand next to the bed has a drawer. I use the kids magnetic locks available from home depot or lowes to keep the drawer locked. They are the locks used to keep kids out from under the sink and other stuff. The key is a magnetic key that you put on the drawer to disengage the lock. If the drawer is yanked on hard it will open(just incase you cant find the key in the middle of the night). This way of opening would also make enough noise to wake you from a dead sleep. My XD .45 only goes in there before bed, and back In the safe in the morning. I have a 3 and 7 year old.

Dark&Good
02-18-2009, 3:00 PM
Some container with a 3-digit combination lock, at arms' length.
I don't have kids, so I have the above minus the container :43:

1911m1a
02-18-2009, 3:21 PM
Its simple really
keep them locked up when your away and carry while your home

:rubs hands together:

yes, time to purchase that 3" 1911

sorensen440
02-18-2009, 3:21 PM
:rubs hands together:

yes, time to purchase that 3" 1911
why do you need a compact to carry in home ???

1911m1a
02-18-2009, 3:37 PM
you dont, but by any chance have you been talking with my girlfriend?

sorensen440
02-18-2009, 3:39 PM
you dont, but by any chance have you been talking with my girlfriend?
ahhh lol yes you do need to go buy one
its for the safety of the children :D

Dark&Good
02-18-2009, 3:44 PM
:iagree: :rofl:

what2be
02-18-2009, 4:02 PM
Might as well have been cut and pasted from the Brady website. Go ahead and try to prove that. And when you get done filtering thru the FBI and CDC statistical data, you come back here with a report showing how more infants / toddlers DROWN IN THEIR OWN HOMES, than are hurt or killed by firearms.

Yeah, many more die by drowning in swimming pools that by firearms by far, but on the other side of the coin is the fact that more children are killed by firearms that by people breaking into your home.

Last year a Sacramento sheriff deputy had his 3 (or 4) yo kid grab his pistol and shoot himself in the head. That stuff happens more than you think, and yes, 2 and 3 yo kids are smarter than you think, will wander around the house at night and are mischevious. You DO need to preach to them to never touch a gun, but at the same time show some common sense and keep them out of their reach or easily accessed by them.

Paranoia about someone breaking into your house should only go so far, or you might regret it when it comes to kids in the house.

Edge
02-18-2009, 5:27 PM
Might as well have been cut and pasted from the Brady website. Go ahead and try to prove that. And when you get done filtering thru the FBI and CDC statistical data, you come back here with a report showing how more infants / toddlers DROWN IN THEIR OWN HOMES, than are hurt or killed by firearms.

Dude, if you think I'm advocating against guns in the home read again.

Bottom line, if you have children in your home you have an obligation to keep them safe. We keep our kitchen knives in a drawer with a childproof latch, we keep the bathroom doors shut, put chemicals away in high shelves, and we lock our firearms.

When she's older, maybe 7, I'll be teaching her about gun safety and respect. But I'll still keep 'em all locked away.

duck814
02-18-2009, 5:44 PM
Try a gun safe/cabinet. Keep the safe in a quick accessible place and weapons cocked/locked. Takes me seconds to access my gun cabinet.

~Duck

Meka
02-18-2009, 7:00 PM
I have a Gun Vault with key pad next to the bed. And shot gun mount to my box spring frame. I generally leave the key in the shotgun mount lock.

what2be
02-18-2009, 7:09 PM
Dude, if you think I'm advocating against guns in the home read again.

Bottom line, if you have children in your home you have an obligation to keep them safe. We keep our kitchen knives in a drawer with a childproof latch, we keep the bathroom doors shut, put chemicals away in high shelves, and we lock our firearms.

When she's older, maybe 7, I'll be teaching her about gun safety and respect. But I'll still keep 'em all locked away.

+ a million

Best post in this thread

Swiss
02-18-2009, 8:28 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Edge
Dude, if you think I'm advocating against guns in the home read again.

Bottom line, if you have children in your home you have an obligation to keep them safe. We keep our kitchen knives in a drawer with a childproof latch, we keep the bathroom doors shut, put chemicals away in high shelves, and we lock our firearms.

When she's older, maybe 7, I'll be teaching her about gun safety and respect. But I'll still keep 'em all locked away.

+ a million

Best post in this thread

I agree as well.

50CalAL
02-18-2009, 10:36 PM
I agree that children are a lot more resourceful than most would think...I don't have any children but have lots of godchildren, nieces and nephews and whenever they are @ my house they find they're way into all sorts of places they're not suppose to be.

Keep the guns locked up but accessible. Keep your handgun in a readily accessible safe in a night table or what not. I like the gunvault safes but went with a v-line as I don't like the idea that you have to have a power source for the safe.

http://www.vlineind.com/html/top_draw.html
http://www.vlineind.com/html/hide-away.html

As for the shotgun, haven't found a quick access safe for that.

Swiss
02-18-2009, 10:47 PM
I have V-Line too, in my case the Quick Vault (http://www.vlineind.com/html/quick_vault.html). Any burglar that wants it better bring a Sawzall - it's lagged into the studs each side.

CABilly
02-19-2009, 2:23 AM
Might as well have been cut and pasted from the Brady website. Go ahead and try to prove that. And when you get done filtering thru the FBI and CDC statistical data, you come back here with a report showing how more infants / toddlers DROWN IN THEIR OWN HOMES, than are hurt or killed by firearms.

Hello, Red Herring! Just what does drowning have to do with home defense mechanisms being capable of doing more harm than what they're intended to defend against? Can you actually refute his point and say that, no, more kids are hurt/killed by intruders than those who find their parents' gun? Just consider the odds: what are the chances of someone breaking into your house with the intent to cause you and your family harm? What are the chances of your kid being in the house without your eyes on him/her? Something tells me that in most normal situations, the latter happens more often.

On topic, Secure Logic (http://www.securelogiconline.com/) has some really cool products. I like the wall safe with the biometric gravity door. No fumbling or messing up any combos, and the door opens instantly.

7x57
02-19-2009, 8:23 AM
Protecting your family is important, but many more children are wounded/killed by firearms that they have gained access to then by someone breaking into the house.

Reference please.

7x57

Stormfeather
02-19-2009, 10:01 AM
Reference please.

7x57

+ 1000

seems like the brady bunch has infiltrated again. . . .

maxicon
02-19-2009, 10:42 AM
Dude, if you think I'm advocating against guns in the home read again.

Bottom line, if you have children in your home you have an obligation to keep them safe. We keep our kitchen knives in a drawer with a childproof latch, we keep the bathroom doors shut, put chemicals away in high shelves, and we lock our firearms.

When she's older, maybe 7, I'll be teaching her about gun safety and respect. But I'll still keep 'em all locked away.

Yeah, even if you've taught your kids safe handling and respect for guns, they have friends, and stuff happens. Locking them up is the only option, IMO.

!@#$
02-19-2009, 10:47 AM
Its simple really
keep them locked up when your away and carry while your home

if you have kids this is the only way.

KylaGWolf
02-19-2009, 10:06 PM
Isn't there a law that says if there are children under the age of 16 in the house that you cannot have a unlocked weapon in the house? I might be wrong but I remember a sign about it in one of the gun shops here in San Diego. But I can't quote you the statute number off the top of my head.

bombadillo
02-19-2009, 10:42 PM
I keep one in the front of the house with 1 magazine full and in the gun takes a simple rack and fire, no safeties to be concerned with. I keep 1 in the bedroom also with one magazine full and loaded in gun. I keep an extra mag next to each so I can rack it and grab the 2nd mag in case the first 8/10 shots don't count.

sorensen440
02-19-2009, 10:46 PM
Isn't there a law that says if there are children under the age of 16 in the house that you cannot have a unlocked weapon in the house? I might be wrong but I remember a sign about it in one of the gun shops here in San Diego. But I can't quote you the statute number off the top of my head.
No such law

jrsportssupply
02-19-2009, 11:17 PM
Isn't there a law that says if there are children under the age of 16 in the house that you cannot have a unlocked weapon in the house? I might be wrong but I remember a sign about it in one of the gun shops here in San Diego. But I can't quote you the statute number off the top of my head.

Not quite. There is a law that if a minor steals your readily accessible (i.e. not locked w/a CA certified lock or in a CA certified safe) handgun, and subsequently uses that gun in a crime, then YOU can be charged with a crime. Gun dealers in CA are required to post that sign in their shops, along with a few other signs. DOJ auditors check those signs as part 1 of an annual audit.

FWIW, I believe that it's your children's FRIENDS that will wreak the most havoc with your guns, not your children. As a responsible gun owner, you will have taught your children all about guns, thus removing the "forbidden fruit" aspect. You cannot guarantee that your children's friends have been given the same practical education.

sorensen440
02-19-2009, 11:18 PM
FWIW, I believe that it's your children's FRIENDS that will wreak the most havoc with your guns, not your children. As a responsible gun owner, you will have taught your children all about guns, thus removing the "forbidden fruit" aspect. You cannot guarantee that your children's friends have been given the same practical education.
Very very true !

Dark&Good
02-19-2009, 11:33 PM
Gun dealers in CA are required to post that sign in their shops, along with a few other signs. DOJ auditors check those signs as part 1 of an annual audit.

Just a side note on that: I like the OTHER, non-REQUIRED posts in gun shops... One of them says "I can't always call 911 first" :D

This does lots of good to the DOJ auditors, too.

Gem1950
02-20-2009, 6:06 AM
Hide-a-gun

http://www.sportsmansguide.com/net/cb/cb.aspx?a=437372

bombadillo
02-20-2009, 8:45 AM
http://www.sportsmansguide.com/net/cb/cb.aspx?a=407947

First one good, this one mo betta!

postal16
02-20-2009, 8:57 AM
handgun with tactical light in lock box by bed and pump shotgun loaded with slugs in closet with trigger lock and tactical sling

flamaest
02-20-2009, 10:07 PM
Link:

The CLOSET VAULT
http://www.cybersafetyproducts.com/vlineclosetvault.htm

F.

Blacktail 8541
02-21-2009, 7:22 AM
I see you said you don't have kids, but are planning to. You might have to rethink your plan. Kids WILL come into your room in the middle of the night. They're quiet and know the lay of the land too, so don't be surprised if you don't hear anything until awakened by small fingers prying open your eyes as they say, "Da Da, awake?"

.

It has been a long time since I had a little one, but this statement hits the nail on the head.

Home security is not a random action that you do. It is a plan and practice, Practice, PRACTICE.
Without knowing the OP and his home it is hard to recomend a plan. But at the very least, an easily operated lock box at the bedside with a loaded handgun or shells for a shotgun would seem appropriate.