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View Full Version : possible attempt to get 60 dems in senate?


lioneaglegriffin
01-30-2009, 7:38 PM
heard this may be a way to get a filibuster proof senate. It is unclear as to if the Democratic Governor will agree to appoint a democrat to replace the republican.

not sure about how important this is because if he won in a Northeastern state i would think he is a RHINO anyway. please correct me if i'm wrong.


http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-commerce30-2009jan30,0,1157951.story

Sen. Judd Gregg reportedly considered for Commerce
It's Obama's final Cabinet post without a nominee. If the New Hampshire Republican had his post filled by a Democrat, it would help land the Democrats a filibuster-proof majority.
By Peter Nicholas
January 30, 2009
Reporting from Washington -- Sen. Judd Gregg (R-N.H.) is under consideration for the Commerce secretary post in President Obama's Cabinet, raising the prospect that Democrats could gain a filibuster-proof majority of 60 seats in the Senate, according to two officials familiar with the selection process.

Gregg, who faces reelection in 2010, is one of several people under consideration for the remaining Cabinet post for which Obama has no nominee.


New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson had been picked for the Commerce job, but he pulled out this month amid a grand jury probe into a state contract award.

Since then, Obama has been casting about for a replacement but has not settled on anyone, according to White House aides. On Thursday, a Republican Senate aide and a Democratic official confirmed that Gregg had emerged as a candidate.

Gregg's office declined to comment.


From a political perspective, the selection could prove a gift to the Democrats. If Gregg were to resign from the Senate, his replacement would be chosen by New Hampshire's Democratic governor, John Lynch.

If Lynch were to give the seat to a fellow Democrat, that would boost the party's count in the Senate to 59, including the two independents who caucus with Democrats.

And if Minnesota Democrat Al Franken ultimately joined the Senate, the number would grow to 60 -- the threshold needed to deprive Republicans of the ability to use filibusters to block legislation. The Minnesota Senate race is still in dispute.

With a 60-vote majority in the Senate, coupled with a comfortable Democratic margin in the House, Obama could push through his agenda with a minimum of Republican resistance.For that reason, some analysts doubted that Gregg would take the job. He would come under strong pressure from fellow Republicans to stay put.

The GOP aide, who requested anonymity because he is not authorized to speak publicly on the matter, suggested that a deal could be worked out in which Lynch agrees to appoint a Republican successor.

"There might be an agreement reached where the Democratic governor does not appoint a Democratic replacement," the aide said.

Accepting the post would spare Gregg a potentially difficult reelection campaign in 2010.

Last fall, registered Democrats in New Hampshire outnumbered Republicans for the first time since the state began keeping records, said Ray Buckley, chairman of the state Democratic Party.

New Hampshire voters not only chose Barack Obama in November, but they voted out of office another prominent political son, then-Sen. John E. Sununu (R-N.H.), whose father had been governor and later White House chief of staff.

"In modern-day New Hampshire, no Republican has an easy election," Buckley said.

Amy Walter, editor in chief of the Hotline, a daily news service devoted to politics, countered that Gregg would be a formidable candidate.

"It's clear to me that New Hampshire is trending blue. But he is in a much stronger position than his former colleague, John Sununu, in 2008. . . . There are certainly Republicans who have been able to figure out how to win despite unfavorable head winds," Walter said.

Gregg, a third-term senator, is conservative on trade and tax issues, which has won him strong marks from the business community.

He is also a conservative on social issues, which could prove an obstacle in confirmation hearings. He fought legislation in the last Congress to outlaw job discrimination against gay people.

Gregg is considered a tough legislative player who provided reliable support for President Bush, though he once admitted to doubts about Bush's troop buildup in Iraq.

There is no ambiguity about his business record. He received a 100% score from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce for his votes in 2006, while earning just 7% from the AFL-CIO.

dfletcher
01-30-2009, 7:55 PM
Fairly slick approach. Gregg is iffy on gun control, he was in Congress for the '94 ban and don't know if he was for or against.

The current NH Governor is no Meldrim Thomson, but he's progun, prodeath penalty, against sales tax and the other things important to NH residents - personally I wouldn't mind if Gov Lynch appointed himself to the seat. He's popular as hell back home and would be an improvement over Gregg. On his own I think he'd probably appoint someone cast from his mold, but you never know what influence the party will have on him.

SwissFluCase
01-30-2009, 8:17 PM
I looked up Gregg on Google, and there seems to be a lot of controversy.

That said, he looks like an allay to me.

http://www.ontheissues.org/senate/Judd_Gregg.htm

Regards,


SwissFluCase

dfletcher
01-30-2009, 8:33 PM
According to the site, he voted "no" on banning lawsuits against gun manufacturers - which appears a negative for us - but that same bill reauthorized the '94 AW ban. He previously voted "yes" on a similar bill that did not contain the AW provision. Maybe I should go from "iffy" to "OK"?


Interesting how Washington works, isn't it?

lioneaglegriffin
01-30-2009, 9:12 PM
According to the site, he voted "no" on banning lawsuits against gun manufacturers - which appears a negative for us - but that same bill reauthorized the '94 AW ban. He previously voted "yes" on a similar bill that did not contain the AW provision. Maybe I should go from "iffy" to "OK"?


Interesting how Washington works, isn't it?

yes, yes it is...

Voted YES on prohibiting foreign & UN aid that restricts US gun ownership. (Sep 2007)
Voted YES on prohibiting lawsuits against gun manufacturers. (Jul 2005)
Voted NO on banning lawsuits against gun manufacturers for gun violence. (Mar 2004)
Voted NO on background checks at gun shows. (May 1999)
Voted YES on more penalties for gun & drug violations. (May 1999)
Voted YES on loosening license & background checks at gun shows. (May 1999)
Voted YES on maintaining current law: guns sold without trigger locks. (Jul 1998

yea OK i guess does he have a NRA grade?

Edit: found out myself

from last election:http://www.nationalreview.com/kopel/kopel200411021307.asp

Republican Senator Judd Gregg (*C/D-) was formerly pro-gun, but now rarely votes for the Second Amendment when the issue is close.

NRA C & GOA D-

sounds like a lukewarm ally at best.

Timberline
01-31-2009, 12:29 PM
With a 60-vote majority in the Senate, coupled with a comfortable Democratic margin in the House, Obama could push through his agenda with a minimum of Republican resistance.For that reason, some analysts doubted that Gregg would take the job. He would come under strong pressure from fellow Republicans to stay put.


There are several good Republican Senators who are supporting the Obama Administration in the current Congress. However, never discount the possibility of Democratic resistance to misguided legislation.

lioneaglegriffin
01-31-2009, 8:58 PM
There are several good Republican Senators who are supporting the Obama Administration in the current Congress. However, never discount the possibility of Democratic resistance to misguided legislation.

yes but many here think blue dogs will roll over like Abe lincoln did with Blago.