PDA

View Full Version : CHP keeping a blog on you


daves100
01-05-2009, 6:12 PM
Was talking with a guy who has been on ride alongs with the CHP and was told that after your pulled over. the officer can go in and enter blog of information on you, IE how you acted when pulled over , if you had a weapon with you,temper, ect so when the next time your pulled over all this info comes up..


Has anyone else heard this?

Matt C
01-05-2009, 6:20 PM
Seems like a good thing to me.

USN CHIEF
01-05-2009, 6:23 PM
I also agree with said blog. Sounds like a good idea until an officer abuses it.

Beelzy
01-05-2009, 6:26 PM
Well that explains everything!

I always wondered why officers were so polite to me when they pull me over
for speeding. They already know I'm an A-hole and don't want me to get
started!

That or they really appreciate my continued revenue generation. :laugh:

DDT
01-05-2009, 6:33 PM
That would have to be open to FOIA requests for your own "entry." If it isn't I'd have a major issue with it. I'm not real comfortable with it even in general, we are talking about interactions that may not even result in a citation and even those that do are most likely code infractions. What if officer A has a stick up his arse the day he pulls you over and puts libelous information in the "blog" and you start getting cited every time you have an interaction with an officer after that?

MP301
01-05-2009, 6:49 PM
This is nothing new at all. Since police have had computers in their cars, they have been keeping notes on thier activities, including info about us. Before computers, they entered a lot of this type of info on the back of their copies of the citation that you were issued...so when they went to court, they could remember how you acted, etc.

DDT
01-05-2009, 6:51 PM
This is nothing new at all. Since police have had computers in their cars, they have been keeping notes on thier activities, including info about us. Before computers, they entered a lot of this type of info on the back of their copies of the citation that you were issued...so when they went to court, they could remember how you acted, etc.

They were prevented from doing that a while ago. They used to use a particular abbreviation on their citations. They'd write "AH" on the back so they judge would know without them having to testify to it in court if it was contested. It was essentially a way of persuading the judge underhandedly.

MrSlippyFist
01-05-2009, 6:52 PM
If you show up on a LEO blog often, maybe you need to be locked up or take driving classes anyway. The more resources they utilize the better.

joe_sun
01-05-2009, 6:53 PM
CHP doesn't do ride a longs and hasn't for a LOOONG time. Not since the one grabbed a shotgun out of the squad car and killed a suspect.

nobody33
01-05-2009, 7:12 PM
It's not called a blog.... it's field interview cards or forms. It's been a law enforcement investigation tool for about 70 years. Well before blogs were around. Every agency I know of has them. It doesnt automatically come up when we stop someone (and it doesn't for CHP).

I used it to return a stolen gun two weeks ago. The owner had made some type of report. I used the computer system found his phone number and called him. He didn't know his house had been burgularized as he was out of town.

I mainly use it to track homeless people. When we stop them we fill out an interview form (ours looks like a ticket). It gets dumped into the computer system and we can run it later on. It includes all kinds of info and comments. 99% of mine say this- parolee used crack in last week. searched negative.

FreedomIsNotFree
01-05-2009, 7:20 PM
This is nothing new at all. Since police have had computers in their cars, they have been keeping notes on thier activities, including info about us. Before computers, they entered a lot of this type of info on the back of their copies of the citation that you were issued...so when they went to court, they could remember how you acted, etc.

LEO's still often write notes on the back of citations to help them remember details if/when a trial occurs. With the hundreds that they issue monthly its really no surprise. What's cool is you can request a copy of the back of the citation through discovery. I've used it a couple times to get an understanding of what the LEO plans to say at trial.

thatrogue
01-05-2009, 8:00 PM
CHP doesn't do ride a longs and hasn't for a LOOONG time. Not since the one grabbed a shotgun out of the squad car and killed a suspect.

That's funny I just did a ride along a few weeks back up here in Roseville.

artherd
01-05-2009, 8:06 PM
If you show up on a LEO blog often, maybe you need to be locked up or take driving classes anyway. The more resources they utilize the better.

Problem, meet reason for the problem.


I'm fine with all this record keeping - except when it is used against the citizenry without adjudication.

Only convictions should be used for any kind of impeachment purposes - including background investigations. See MrSlippyFist's comment for why.

CA_Libertarian
01-05-2009, 9:12 PM
Yeah... no potential for abuse there.

I'm sure all sorts of nasty things come up when they run my plates. When I was 'detained' I was carrying a gun (completely in compliance with all laws). I was reading Ron Paul's The Revolution: A Manifesto. Then there's the part where I showed individuality refused to agree to keep my activism out of 'their town.'

I worry about how this might affect future interaction with LEOs.

I remember reading a news article where the cops served a no-knock warrant over an anonymous (and later found to be bogus) child endangerment complaint. The reason they didn't just knock at the door and politely address the matter?? The database had a note for the address listing the resident as a "Constitutionalist." (Apparently "Constitution" is a bad word among some LE agencies.) I wish I could find that article, as it illustrates very well just how these databases are abused.

cortayack
01-05-2009, 9:41 PM
It's not called a blog.... it's field interview cards or forms. It's been a law enforcement investigation tool for about 70 years. Well before blogs were around. Every agency I know of has them. It doesnt automatically come up when we stop someone (and it doesn't for CHP).

I used it to return a stolen gun two weeks ago. The owner had made some type of report. I used the computer system found his phone number and called him. He didn't know his house had been burgularized as he was out of town.

I mainly use it to track homeless people. When we stop them we fill out an interview form (ours looks like a ticket). It gets dumped into the computer system and we can run it later on. It includes all kinds of info and comments. 99% of mine say this- parolee used crack in last week. searched negative.

^^^I was waiting for my dad once on side of road...He was bring me tires for my car up on the highway(blown two ties)....Anyways two squad cars came to my location BC I look suspious :43:......They fulled out a form on me(interview). I didn't answer any questions other than my car is up on the Highway and I'm waiting for someone..........

tyrist
01-05-2009, 10:37 PM
We put information on the field interview cards and those get entered by a clerk into a computer system. The system is usually used by detectives to track down suspects who might be involved in whatever they are investigating. A field interview card caught and convicted the night stalker.

rkt88edmo
01-05-2009, 10:55 PM
wikiPDa? Just an electronic version of FI cards neh? Potential for abuse is there though.

LOW2000
01-05-2009, 10:55 PM
If you show up on a LEO blog often, maybe you need to be locked up or take driving classes anyway. The more resources they utilize the better.

So my recurring no front plate tickets should result in me being locked up? :rolleyes:

Pvt. Cowboy
01-05-2009, 10:56 PM
A field interview card caught and convicted the night stalker.

I think that some teenage kids in East LA caught him red handed trying to steal their uncle's low rider and were beating the hell out of him when CHP finally showed up.

pizzatorte
01-05-2009, 11:04 PM
I remember reading a news article where the cops served a no-knock warrant over an anonymous (and later found to be bogus) child endangerment complaint. The reason they didn't just knock at the door and politely address the matter?? The database had a note for the address listing the resident as a "Constitutionalist." (Apparently "Constitution" is a bad word among some LE agencies.) I wish I could find that article, as it illustrates very well just how these databases are abused.

http://wnd.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=59566

The sheriff said the decision to use SWAT team force was justified because the father was a "self-proclaimed constitutionalist" and had made threats and "comments" over the years.

BitterVoter
01-05-2009, 11:18 PM
Yeah, I remember this article. . The guy had been a medic when his kid fell and someone else called an EMT. . . They guy told the EMT to pound sand he had it under control so the EMT called social workers...who then called the sheriff to remove the child so that a "qualified" medical person could evaluate the kid.

But not to be a butt head and throw the thread OT....

I don't live in the fear that something can be used against, but that is because I don't have enough energy to fight ALL injustices of the government. That is the beauty of it. . . I defend the 2A so that others can have the freedom to look after the rest. Little give and take...Just like the ACLU...they may not argue 2A, but they do good work for other rights.

I remember reading a news article where the cops served a no-knock warrant over an anonymous (and later found to be bogus) child endangerment complaint. The reason they didn't just knock at the door and politely address the matter?? The database had a note for the address listing the resident as a "Constitutionalist." (Apparently "Constitution" is a bad word among some LE agencies.) I wish I could find that article, as it illustrates very well just how these databases are abused.

http://wnd.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=59566

The sheriff said the decision to use SWAT team force was justified because the father was a "self-proclaimed constitutionalist" and had made threats and "comments" over the years.

tyrist
01-05-2009, 11:34 PM
I think that some teenage kids in East LA caught him red handed trying to steal their uncle's low rider and were beating the hell out of him when CHP finally showed up.

Officers detained somebody who appeared to be a prowler and cut him loose since they did'nt have evidence of a crime. Later a detective used that field interview card to show he was in the area where the crime occured.

nooner
01-06-2009, 1:00 AM
We put information on the field interview cards and those get entered by a clerk into a computer system. The system is usually used by detectives to track down suspects who might be involved in whatever they are investigating. A field interview card caught and convicted the night stalker.Hmm, seems to me one bad guy caught using this system isn't worth one good guy being harassed or unlawfully singled out.

tyrist
01-06-2009, 1:08 AM
Hmm, seems to me one bad guy caught using this system isn't worth one good guy being harassed or unlawfully singled out.

it's not one guy....it's many.

A robbery happens and the guy gets away but they get a good description....pull up the field identification cards and see if any of them have a description match...then pull up some crimminal records and check. They also can pull up info on traffic tickets I belive as well.

nooner
01-06-2009, 1:28 AM
it's not one guy....it's many.

A robbery happens and the guy gets away but they get a good description....pull up the field identification cards and see if any of them have a description match...then pull up some crimminal records and check. They also can pull up info on traffic tickets I belive as well.

one, many makes no difference if it is abused and it sounds like it is too easy for it to be abused.

You see, I am a law abiding citizen and the government has no business keeping records on me if I am not a criminal.

mikehaas
01-06-2009, 3:14 AM
one, many makes no difference if it is abused and it sounds like it is too easy for it to be abused.
Now, what kind of criteria is THAT? Just about every tool in an LEO's bag is subject to be abused and the firearm on their hip may be the easiest. Suddenly, you're not even letting them carry handcuffs or billy clubs?

You see, I am a law abiding citizen and the government has no business keeping records on me if I am not a criminal.
I know what you mean. But here again, government already keeps all kinds of records on law abiding citizens - info more sensitive than any bank. They know your address, what cars you own, what your income is, what taxes you've paid (or not), your SSN, property records, arrest record, etc etc etc - a TON of personal information. And of course, with that comes a huge potential for abuse but who would argue that government could function without that info?

LEOs have discretionary powers, it comes with their job and use of tools. Keeping a record of significant interactions with individuals, regardless of criminal status, clearly is of benefit to them. I'm all for preventing government from knowing what guns I own, but IMO it's carrying the civil liberties banner a bit too far to say that cops can't compare notes and impressions about that which they observe in the performance of their duties, regardless of subject matter.

Dr. Peter Venkman
01-06-2009, 3:24 AM
LEO's still often write notes on the back of citations to help them remember details if/when a trial occurs. With the hundreds that they issue monthly its really no surprise. What's cool is you can request a copy of the back of the citation through discovery. I've used it a couple times to get an understanding of what the LEO plans to say at trial.

Depending on your jurisdiction you won't be able to get a copy of it right up until the arraignment.

hill billy
01-06-2009, 8:09 AM
Depending on your jurisdiction you won't be able to get a copy of it right up until the arraignment.

Failure to provide documents requested in discovery in a reasonable amount of time and generally a given amount of time before trial is grounds for dismissal in every jurisdiction in America.

Ballistic043
01-06-2009, 8:27 AM
why is this a big deal?


it would be the same as if someone pulled out his own personal journal and wrote down notes after a TS. to cover his ***, to compare notes, whatever. if there is a discrepancy, then its his bad day. because there is usually a camera facing the offending vehicle

even so, your temper doesn't just "show up" on the MDT.

"hmm. ill just run him through the NCIC... oh my.. it seems he is a very pissed off person when he gets pulled over... better switch to condition 1"

AaronHorrocks
01-06-2009, 8:46 AM
I remember reading a news article where the cops served a no-knock warrant over an anonymous (and later found to be bogus) child endangerment complaint. The reason they didn't just knock at the door and politely address the matter?? The database had a note for the address listing the resident as a "Constitutionalist." (Apparently "Constitution" is a bad word among some LE agencies.) I wish I could find that article, as it illustrates very well just how these databases are abused.

I haven't mentioned it yet on the internet, but I will this month with a full write up and photos...

I've been having trouble with an officer for about two years that doesn't like my hobby of collecting and restoring old army vehicles. Finally, she did an illegal search (damaging property in the process!) and wrote me up for a city violation. I had to go down to the station to pay the fine and file a contest - a hearing request. Hearing was denied in a rejection letter. I wrote back stating that the denial was unacceptable based on the facts that no violation was commited, that the officer "staged" the photos because an illegal search was nessisary to prep the site, and that the officer damaged my property during her unconstitutional illegal search. I haven't heard back yet. :mad:

haodoken
01-06-2009, 8:57 AM
LEO's still often write notes on the back of citations to help them remember details if/when a trial occurs. With the hundreds that they issue monthly its really no surprise. What's cool is you can request a copy of the back of the citation through discovery. I've used it a couple times to get an understanding of what the LEO plans to say at trial.

Yes, writing on the back of the copy of the citation is a common occurance. I do it all the time. I just lists what I observed and whatever you said and a diagram of the infraction. Some PD's like mine have in car video. That jogs my memory even quicker. I often take that to court and show the defendant before trial.

Ballistic043
01-06-2009, 8:59 AM
exactly

ilbob
01-06-2009, 9:02 AM
I don't know about a blog, but here in Illinois they keep records of every time you are stopped and why, and what the end result of the stop was. I think they can add comments if they want to.

Kid Stanislaus
01-06-2009, 10:32 AM
If you show up on a LEO blog often, maybe you need to be locked up or take driving classes anyway. The more resources they utilize the better.

Right, why don't we just expand police power exponentially? Surely none of them would abuse it!!:(

MrSlippyFist
01-06-2009, 10:34 AM
Right, why don't we just expand police power expodentially? Surely none of them would abuse it!!:(

Good cops will utilize what they have for the better of their community. Bad cops will abuse whatever systems are available, regardless of the system.

Kid Stanislaus
01-06-2009, 11:03 AM
You see, I am a law abiding citizen and the government has no business keeping records on me if I am not a criminal.

Its called, I believe, a "dossier" and one none other than J. Edgar Hoover was famous for his collection of dossiers on the rich and famous plus a lot of politicians. If you collect enough information on a single person its just a matter of time before you come up with something that can be made to look incriminating. Its like the police officer following somebody through town. No matter how good a driver that person is its just a matter of time before he makes a small mistake that can be used as an excuse to make a stop. Things can really go down hill from there.

Kid Stanislaus
01-06-2009, 11:08 AM
why is this a big deal? It would be the same as if someone pulled out his own personal journal and wrote down notes after a TS. to cover his ***, to compare notes, whatever.


The "big deal" is that the individual does not have a huge powerful government behind him to bring all kinds of pressure to bear on whomever it chooses. Some officers use that power sparingly and others are not so reticent.

Kid Stanislaus
01-06-2009, 11:11 AM
I've been having trouble with an officer for about two years that doesn't like my hobby of collecting and restoring old army vehicles. Finally, she did an illegal search (damaging property in the process!) and wrote me up for a city violation. I had to go down to the station to pay the fine and file a contest - a hearing request. Hearing was denied in a rejection letter. I wrote back stating that the denial was unacceptable based on the facts that no violation was commited, that the officer "staged" the photos because an illegal search was nessisary to prep the site, and that the officer damaged my property during her unconstitutional illegal search. I haven't heard back yet. :mad:


I hope to high heaven you've got an attorney. Picking a fight like this can lead to ALL KINDS of complications. I'm not suggesting you back down, you understand, just fight this battle wisely.

sierratangofoxtrotunion
01-06-2009, 11:14 AM
it would be the same as if someone pulled out his own personal journal and wrote down notes after a TS. to cover his ***, to compare notes, whatever.

It would be the same as if there was a database available to the public where every contact with a given officer was documented by the public.

Kid Stanislaus
01-06-2009, 11:15 AM
Yes, writing on the back of the copy of the citation is a common occurance. I do it all the time. I just lists what I observed and whatever you said and a diagram of the infraction. Some PD's like mine have in car video. That jogs my memory even quicker. I often take that to court and show the defendant before trial.

I like the videos a lot better than a police blog. The video will either support the officer (I'm sure they do about 95%+ of the time) or support the person stopped. There's usually not a lot of grey area. I'd like to see TWO camera in each police car, one with a standard lens and one with a wide angle.

Ballistic043
01-06-2009, 11:17 AM
the conclusion that im drawing is that some of you would just rather see no system at all, instead of one that occasionally and inevidably will get abused.


im sorry but if you are saying they shouldnt have it just because a few people have no morals, then lets also ban guns because of those few idiots who go out and kill innocent people with them. it is the same logic really

Kid Stanislaus
01-06-2009, 11:35 AM
the conclusion that im drawing is that some of you would just rather see no system at all, instead of one that occasionally and inevidably will get abused.


im sorry but if you are saying they shouldnt have it just because a few people have no morals, then lets also ban guns because of those few idiots who go out and kill innocent people with them. it is the same logic really


There seems to be something you don't understand about the use of government POWER and how its use will spread very quickly if not kept within strict guidelines. Lets remember, its we CONSERVATIVES who distrust government and its the LIBERALS who whole heartedly embrace it.

Ballistic043
01-06-2009, 11:42 AM
i dont think you understand that guidelines are not going to stop some mental defect from abusing his power. if someone gets through the system, and he wants to abuse it, hes going to do it. its inevidable and happens in all aspects and areas of life

is it right? NO! does it and will it continue to happen.. YES

realistic solutions are what we need. not just remove it all together to solve the problem.

MrSlippyFist
01-06-2009, 12:50 PM
I'd be more worried about this:

http://current.newsweek.com/budgettravel/2008/12/whats_in_your_government_trave.html

Bizcuits
01-06-2009, 12:53 PM
CHP doesn't do ride a longs and hasn't for a LOOONG time. Not since the one grabbed a shotgun out of the squad car and killed a suspect.

Your mistaken.

To become a CHP Officer, you are recommended, encourage and damn near forced to do a ride a long first.

Bizcuits
01-06-2009, 12:54 PM
realistic solutions are what we need. not just remove it all together to solve the problem.

Bingo.

To just remove something would be like doing what Anti-gunners do. Instead of finding a solution to the real problem you want to restrict things...

Vacaville
01-06-2009, 1:01 PM
If any government official records any personal information about you and then shares it with anyone else, you should be able to have the opportunity view it and to contest it in the event that it is inaccurate.

As an educator I am expected to follow these rules. I'm not a lawyer, but I have been told there are laws to this effect. I don't see why it would be any different for law enforcement.

N6ATF
01-06-2009, 1:05 PM
The word "blog" is the WRONG word to use.

Short for weblog, an on-line web-zine or diary (usually with facilities for reader comments and discussion threads) made accessible through the World Wide Web. This term is widespread and readily forms derivatives, of which the best known may be blogosphere.

It's not on the WWW, so it's NOT a BLOG!

CA_Libertarian
01-06-2009, 1:09 PM
It would be the same as if there was a database available to the public where every contact with a given officer was documented by the public.

Not exactly. The public database wouldn't be immediately accessible upon (or before) contact with an officer. Also, there's not much the citizen can do with that info. Other than saying nasty things about the cop writing your speeding ticket, the database wouldn't do anything to harm the officers.

Still, might be a good idea... I know college professors hate those websites where they get 'graded' by their students.

AR-shogun
01-06-2009, 8:50 PM
CHP officers do Write on the back of the ticket especially if you said something of value or where a real schmuck.

Also the CHP does allow ride alongs in certain cases. Like if you are a relative or going through the Academy. Some Captains my be a little bit more flexible than others.

larnfow
01-06-2009, 9:23 PM
this thread sure has managed to "out" the cops that lurk amongst us...

(My jurisdiction only uses this system to target and harass the non conformists):kest:

tyrist
01-06-2009, 10:08 PM
In my department if I detain you then it's recorded in about 3 different ways.

retired
01-07-2009, 1:44 AM
We put information on the field interview cards and those get entered by a clerk into a computer system. The system is usually used by detectives to track down suspects who might be involved in whatever they are investigating. A field interview card caught and convicted the night stalker.

I thought it was a bunch of angry citizens (well, some of them were probably legal:D) in ELA that caught old Richard.:D

Along the same subject and a bit off topic; I got to transport the evidence to the crime lab from the Diamond Bar murder he did. A spoon, watermelon and handcuffs.

Glock22Fan
01-07-2009, 8:30 AM
It would be the same as if there was a database available to the public where every contact with a given officer was documented by the public.

Oh, don't some of us, especially OC'ers, almost do that on this forum? All we have to do is add names and organize it a bit better.

Are we saying that the cops should be able to prevent us talking about them?

CA_Libertarian
01-07-2009, 1:11 PM
Oh, don't some of us, especially OC'ers, almost do that on this forum? All we have to do is add names and organize it a bit better.

Are we saying that the cops should be able to prevent us talking about them?

As I said in my above post, it's very different. Sure, they're both databases, but compare how they are used...

Police have instant access to the database before interaction with their 'subject.' Police are entrusted with considerable power over their fellow citizens.

I don't see much ability on the part of one of us non-LEOs to abuse a database, even if it was highly accessible. We don't have a SWAT team to call in when we see a cop walking up to us, even if we had a way to know if he is a habitual a**hole. I record all my interactions with LE anyhow, which is about the only legal avenue you have to protect yourself from the bad apples in the LE barrel.

rorschach
01-07-2009, 4:51 PM
CHP doesn't do ride a longs and hasn't for a LOOONG time. Not since the one grabbed a shotgun out of the squad car and killed a suspect.

I have never heard of a CHP ridealong killing a suspect, can you cite this?

Anyone can go to the CHP office and request a ridealong. Some area commanders allow ridealongs, others do not. Try different offices, they may have different policy regarding public ridealongs. Explorer scouts and applicants go on ridealongs fairly regularly.

Before computers, officers would keep what was called a 415, which was a daily log of all their contacts, and how much time was spent on each contact.

tyrist
01-07-2009, 7:14 PM
I have never heard of a CHP ridealong killing a suspect, can you cite this?

Anyone can go to the CHP office and request a ridealong. Some area commanders allow ridealongs, others do not. Try different offices, they may have different policy regarding public ridealongs. Explorer scouts and applicants go on ridealongs fairly regularly.

Before computers, officers would keep what was called a 415, which was a daily log of all their contacts, and how much time was spent on each contact.

We still do this.

Vectrexer
01-07-2009, 7:14 PM
Blogs, FI, notes, or whatever you want to call them. I think these tools are good things for the most part.

I f the officer is an *** and you have a real beef later on then request all of his entries on the basis of reviewing his general state of mind and historical credibility. IF you are wrong then you deserved whatever he wrote. But if the LEO is a loon then that needs to come to light as well.

Living in the USA is sometime not easy, but it's better than most other places.

rorschach
01-08-2009, 6:04 PM
We still do this.

I figured as much, I recall when the cars didnt have computers in them...and I'm not that old.

Dont Tread on Me
01-08-2009, 7:21 PM
Nobody33 - thank you for you post. It is great to have such a useful source of information here.

parolee used crack in last week. searched negative.

That would make a great t-shirt!

diginit
01-08-2009, 8:03 PM
So... How can I see this information the LEO's are keeping on me? A few days ago, I was unloading from a camping trip when 6 officers drove up and proceeded to a neighbors apt. One drawing a taser as he approched the unit. Knowing I was not breaking any laws, I kept unloading. 3 shot up metal targets, 3 rifles,(only 2 in cases) 5 ammo boxes, and the rest of my gear. tent, backpack, table, cooler, etc. None of them seemed to mind, And I know that were watching. but I wonder... Am I on their blog as a gun nut? How can I find out?

tyrist
01-08-2009, 8:18 PM
So... How can I see this information the LEO's are keeping on me? A few days ago, I was unloading from a camping trip when 6 officers drove up and proceeded to a neighbors apt. One drawing a taser as he approched the unit. Knowing I was not breaking any laws, I kept unloading. 3 shot up metal targets, 3 rifles,(only 2 in cases) 5 ammo boxes, and the rest of my gear. tent, backpack, table, cooler, etc. None of them seemed to mind, And I know that were watching. but I wonder... Am I on their blog as a gun nut? How can I find out?

Honestly turning in field interview cards on joe blow citizen is not very productive. There is probably nothing on you at all. The only time I even fill out a FI card for joe blow citizen is if they don't have an ID and I need to organize the information to run it. I just throw the card in the paper shredder at end of watch. The FI cards I turn in are on people on parole/probation....people who have arrest records...gang members...drug addicts etc...these can help solve crimes.

tgun
01-08-2009, 8:39 PM
Can I make some kind of an FOIA request to get a copy of all the notes that the local PD keeps on me? Or maybe that request would just be another item on my list?

I know that you can make FOIA requests to the regional FBI offices and a few years later you will get a packet with supposedly everything they have on you in that office.

diginit
01-08-2009, 8:49 PM
That's good to know. I could just imagine their faces when they saw my preban mags and my Keltec. I felt like telling them that if they ever need to borrow a high powered rifle, They're welcome to use all of mine. I assume that a LEO would use it with the proper discretion. But I hope you are already issued enough fire power to handle the situation at hand.
Believe it or not, You do have backup from some citizens. J.

Invisible_Dave
01-08-2009, 8:49 PM
I was voted "sweetest boy to talk to the police" 3 years in a row based on my CHP blog ;-)

tyrist
01-08-2009, 9:05 PM
That's good to know. I could just imagine their faces when they saw my preban mags and my Keltec. I felt like telling them that if they ever need to borrow a high powered rifle, They're welcome to use all of mine. I assume that a LEO would use it with the proper discretion. But I hope you are already issued enough fire power to handle the situation at hand.
Believe it or not, You do have backup from some citizens. J.

I have never doubted this...a construction worker helped me get a mentally ill drug addict into custody. A person my size but doped up and crazy is not easy to cuff up.

diginit
01-08-2009, 9:13 PM
That's funny. I'm a carpenter. Some people don't like cops. Some people do. Some people are just jerks and need to be put in their place untill they learn to act like adults.
One of my regrets is that I didn't sign on when I was younger. So I wouldn't mind helping out. Just too many arses in the world.

N6ATF
01-09-2009, 12:44 AM
Blogs, FI, notes, or whatever you want to call them.

You can't call it a blog if it's not published on the internet, and be correct. FI and notes are the correct terminology.

tcrpe
01-10-2009, 9:34 PM
Sounds like a good idea until an officer abuses it.

You have a relative, friend or neighbor who works for the DMV? Well, they've rummaged through your records.

You have a relative, friend or neighbor who works for the IRS? Well, they've rummaged through your records.

You have a relative, friend or neighbor who works for the hospital or at your doctor's office? Well, they've rummaged through your records.

You have a relative, friend or neighbor who works for the bank? Well, they've rummaged through your records.

Please explain to me why the CHP would be any different.

tcrpe
01-10-2009, 9:36 PM
Your avatar.

There's no shooting there, but we used to pick up all sorts of .50 BMG brass out there, as well as the link clips that held them together. They literally fell from the sky . . . .

It's a place I go often, but don't want anyone else going there.

BadFish
01-10-2009, 9:45 PM
Honestly turning in field interview cards on joe blow citizen is not very productive. There is probably nothing on you at all. The only time I even fill out a FI card for joe blow citizen is if they don't have an ID and I need to organize the information to run it. I just throw the card in the paper shredder at end of watch. The FI cards I turn in are on people on parole/probation....people who have arrest records...gang members...drug addicts etc...these can help solve crimes.

Thats funny, I used to end up going home with a bunch of those in my shirt pocket. They all ended up in my sock drawer, unless it was something important, but most of them were just a way to remember info when I ran them.

NorCalBusa
01-11-2009, 7:35 AM
CHP doesn't do ride a longs and hasn't for a LOOONG time. Not since the one grabbed a shotgun out of the squad car and killed a suspect.

Sure they do- I've been on several, but you do need an "in". Recruits can ride too.

Ballistic043
01-11-2009, 9:11 AM
Originally Posted by joe_sun
CHP doesn't do ride a longs and hasn't for a LOOONG time. Not since the one grabbed a shotgun out of the squad car and killed a suspect.

are you sure CHP? or are you referring to the texas incident in 07?

female ride along was involved in a shooting where the officer had been disabled during a DUI stop. the officer attempted to approach the suspects vehicle for ID, but before he could get there, the suspect exited the car, pointed a gun at the officer and shot several rounds. one of which hit his dominant (shooting) hand, leaving part of his hand torn up, and part of his gun in pieces. the officer, unable to defend himself, attempts to retreat back to his vehicle for the shotgun, while the suspect retreats to reload. but since the suspect is closer to his car than the officer is to his unit.. the officer is at the disadvantage.

so the female ride along, freaking out at what she just witnessed, decided to take action. so she got the shotgun, exited the unit and did the deed. about 9 pellets and 2 seconds later, the suspect was expired.

the officer, bleeding and in shock, but alive. And she was commended for her efforts. because although she was not required by law or any other means, influence or provocation to help, she still did it. not only for her own well being, but to defend the life of an officer, who every day puts their lives on the line for her, her family, me, you, and everyone.. it would be a GREAT honor to return the favor, IMO.




as for protocols; it is not uncommon for the officer to have ride alongs exit the vehicle. for one thing its good exposure for new recruits. it gives them a chance to get some slight hands-on with the minor aspects of law enforcement and see what they like about it (DV's, DUI's, misdemeanors and fines)as well it helps if the officer needs assistance and backup is not proximal. often times you can be summoned to help carry out duties and in extreme cases, you can also be called upon to help 'shoot back'. BUT (please, sit back down in your commando chair) this almost never EVER happens. and when it does, there are all kinds of legal ramifications that can follow.

as for more serious cases, serving warrants, terrorist or criminal action, rapes or robbery, you will probably sit in the car for a while. you do not want your officer buddies LEO friend coming up and mistaking you (his ride along) For a suspect or anything else along those lines :)

HowardW56
01-11-2009, 9:51 AM
Seems like a good thing to me.

That sounds similar to the premises history maintained by most agencies. They know about past calls, arrests, etc…

Tarn_Helm
01-11-2009, 6:10 PM
Seems like a good thing to me.

I agree.

That is a good idea: I think we should keep a blog on them!


:iamwithstupid:

artherd
01-11-2009, 10:04 PM
I think it's great - I also think every government owned vehicle in the US should have it's position and meta-information available on a google-maps like application for the iPhone.

After all - they have nothing to hide right?

jafount
02-11-2009, 4:17 PM
You have a relative, friend or neighbor who works for the DMV? Well, they've rummaged through your records.

You have a relative, friend or neighbor who works for the IRS? Well, they've rummaged through your records.

You have a relative, friend or neighbor who works for the hospital or at your doctor's office? Well, they've rummaged through your records.

You have a relative, friend or neighbor who works for the bank? Well, they've rummaged through your records.

Please explain to me why the CHP would be any different.

Old topic, but I'll post and bump.

I've FI'd countless persons. I can think of more than once instance, where my FI resulted in me being able to arrest a subject. FI cards are (were) filed and data based. Notes I take on the side of the road from some schmoe who didn't have his license in possession are just that....notes. I always destroyed my notes, because anything noteworthy was either entered into a report or FI Card.

I've never heard of a "blog". Further, it seems like such information could be easily challenged in court, if it was discovered such information was used (all or in part) to conduct a pre-text stop. This is unconstitutional. Further, I cited maybe one in eight to ten that I stopped. I cannot imagine wasting my time entering information on a party into a blog that could later be reviewed. How the hell is anyone supposed to confirm the person driving the car is the same person that was stopped by some random officer months or years before. This is an asinine assertion and just a little more mis-information by some ride along.

As for accessing a persons records, A CHP officer (or any other LE agency officer in California) wouldn't rummage through your records because to do so would be a major career ending felony.

Just my .02

pieeater
02-11-2009, 8:00 PM
I got a speeding ticket 26 years ago by the CHP. I wonder what info they have on me?

Meplat
02-11-2009, 9:23 PM
The last time I was pulled over by a CHP (no ticket) he had a passenger in civies with him.

That's funny I just did a ride along a few weeks back up here in Roseville.

mhho
02-11-2009, 11:46 PM
That or they really appreciate my continued revenue generation. :laugh:

Thank you for your continued contribution to help with our state budget crisis. I will make a note of it on our blog about you. :thumbsup:

Steve O
02-12-2009, 2:53 AM
This is nothing new at all. Since police have had computers in their cars, they have been keeping notes on thier activities, including info about us. Before computers, they entered a lot of this type of info on the back of their copies of the citation that you were issued...so when they went to court, they could remember how you acted, etc.

There are rules of what an officer can and cannot say or do over the radio and computer....but do you notice how the officers always seem to be on their personal cell phones... hummmm....

Steve O
02-12-2009, 3:08 AM
Yeah... no potential for abuse there.

I'm sure all sorts of nasty things come up when they run my plates. When I was 'detained' I was carrying a gun (completely in compliance with all laws). I was reading Ron Paul's The Revolution: A Manifesto. Then there's the part where I showed individuality refused to agree to keep my activism out of 'their town.'

I worry about how this might affect future interaction with LEOs.

I remember reading a news article where the cops served a no-knock warrant over an anonymous (and later found to be bogus) child endangerment complaint. The reason they didn't just knock at the door and politely address the matter?? The database had a note for the address listing the resident as a "Constitutionalist." (Apparently "Constitution" is a bad word among some LE agencies.) I wish I could find that article, as it illustrates very well just how these databases are abused.

Just imagine is he was a constitutionalist with a registered AW!

Zhukov
02-12-2009, 4:02 AM
Whoever said CHP doesn't do ride alongs is incorrect. I've gone on two in the last year and a half. One with 2 different locations. Yes, I had applied for CHP, but I was not far along in the process at all (hadn't even tested yet).

Both officers were quite cool and professional, one was excitied about the OLL stuff.

BSlacker
02-12-2009, 6:37 AM
If you want to find out what your local PD info records generally reflect on you and your address/phone# and your local PD uses radio for most of its comm, it is easy. Get a scanner, tune to your local PD system then when that drug dealing/suspicious vehicles/whatever is happing illegally in the parking lot across the street from your address call in to the local dispatch using your address and phone#. Then listen to the dispatchers call out everything RMS knows about you and your phone/address. It will be broadcast or not, if you are a first time caller. If it is too long to transmit and no officer safety issues are involved then they will just say something like “extensive RMS” this is for locations where lots of minor stuff has gone on that doen’t seem to be relevant to the current call. Unless the officer wants more detail then they can send the RMS record to the in car computer as well.
Here it is called RMS for record management system. Every call out is recorded and all official contact is recorded sometimes a simple verbal note to dispatch for the log and sometimes more info by in car computer is added by the officers in the field. The info seems to be used mostly for crime comparison in an area and suspect info and officer safety. Not a lot of room for officer abuse if you ask me. If you are listening to a scanner you will hear all kinds of info on your dirt bag arguing neighbors as the PD is called out to their location time after time.
The importance of knowing about this system is if you are having problems with a person down the street. Make sure you are the RP or RO in all RMS info the officer will hear as they roll too your location. Be sure the others are firmly in the system as the dirt bag. With good RMS info, when the officer shows up they already have an idea who is who and what is what from the past officer incident info.
Most any non LEO you talk to in America will tell you that police records are only kept on criminals. They will swear up and down this is true. One minute listening to the comm. of the local PD and they change their minds. Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha!

guns_and_labs
02-12-2009, 6:50 AM
I'd be more worried about this:

http://current.newsweek.com/budgettravel/2008/12/whats_in_your_government_trave.html

We used to do the same sort of thing at the airports back in the day, but it was handwritten. Surprising how many smugglers thought you would forget them from their last trip.

But, of course, that was back when profiling and pattern recognition were considered legitimate law enforcement tools.