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View Full Version : What is too young?


Seesm
12-20-2008, 1:56 AM
I ask what is too young to have your kids shooting? I know I know it depends on the kids but just your opinion.

Grandpa teaches the safety and I back it up daily basis. My kids are 5 and 7 and shoot there "red riders" at targets in the back yard every few days with a adult ONLY....

Is this too young? I ask because our 7 year old is asking for a AR15, AK 47, Mini 14, M1 Carbine and Garand for Christmas so I am just asking... Because a parent does not want to let him down!! :)

:) Jk on letting him down but he loves shooting, is this normal... I only shoot like 5 times a years so I am not fanatic but I do love this site. Talk to me.

Axewound
12-20-2008, 3:31 AM
hey i would buy one of those now instead of waiting untill they are old enough, but only if the price is right (obviously prices are little high right now). keep it in the closet and sit on it until they become older.

im no parent but maybe a pair of 10/22's for right now. it would be cheaper than an just one AR. Buy a lower when the prices are down.

if i had a dad that would have taken me out while i was that young to develope skill at that age, id be forever gratefull. just make sure you instill the responsibility of using a firearm in him

who knows what will happen with future gun laws.

Futurecollector
12-20-2008, 3:34 AM
I ask what is too young to have your kids shooting? I know I know it depends on the kids but just your opinion.

Grandpa teaches the safety and I back it up daily basis. My kids are 5 and 7 and shoot there "red riders" at targets in the back yard every few days with a adult ONLY....

Is this too young? I ask because our 7 year old is asking for a AR15, AK 47, Mini 14, M1 Carbine and Garand for Christmas so I am just asking... Because a parent does not want to let him down!! :)

:) Jk on letting him down but he loves shooting, is this normal... I only shoot like 5 times a years so I am not fanatic but I do love this site. Talk to me.


dude im 18 and i shoot at least 2 times a month!!!!!

my uncle gave me a pump BB gun when i was in like RD grade and shot it everyday for almost a year until i broke it and in Th grade which i was either 10 or 11 my dad got me a cross-man Pellet pistol, and then it went from there, at 14 i bought my first Remington in .30-06 and i knew how to do everything and such so my parents didn't mind, so it depends really on if you want to buy one for "Him" because even thought its his, you will still be cleaning it, loading it,(maybe) putting it together etc, and I'm sure that you will supervise him lol, so if you can afford it that would be cool, but remember to tell him that it isn't something that you talk about to all of your other friends. I graduated last year for HS and i remember they would always ask 3-8 grade if there parents owned guns and how many, this was a bait question for the admin to start looking closer, so i would always say that "guns scared me"!!! and idk if parents have guns. end of rant-ish nut thats my .02
FC

rkt88edmo
12-20-2008, 5:58 AM
I don't think 5-7 is too young - as long as they have the attention span and can listen and obey. I haven't been through that yet but am looking forward to it.

CSACANNONEER
12-20-2008, 6:37 AM
I don't think 5-7 is too young - as long as they have the attention span and can listen and obey. I haven't been through that yet but am looking forward to it.

Yep, each person is different. Since we don't know the two kids in question, I think the real question is: "Do you think they are too young?" You know them. Are they acting focused and responsible? I've been around lots of 18-80 year old know it alls who I don't think are responsible enough to handle firearms. I've also been around some 5 year olds who took the shooting sports seriously and were very responsible shooters. So, without knowing your kids, no one here can really say what the right age is for them.

Sam1
12-20-2008, 8:57 AM
get an ar15 and do the 22lr conversion or one of those 22lr ak's. I would go with the ar because later you can just change back the bolt carrier and shoot 556/223 :43:

Seesm
12-20-2008, 9:00 AM
Well for sure they love shooting and are learning all about what is what with guns... They are both young obviously but very respectful with them as well. I will work more with them and make some descisions as money allows... I think rifles are the best for now.... No handguns till they are quite a bit older for me anyway... And to the last poster I agree the AR22 woudl be a killer set up... I am looking for one if anyone has one.

rkt88edmo
12-20-2008, 9:12 AM
As money allows and you are looking for an AR?
Just as much fun to run a 10/22 or start with a used boltgun for under $200

CSACANNONEER
12-20-2008, 9:17 AM
For a good beginner's gun, I would recommend a single shot action (break open, bolt, lever, etc. It will help teach them (any beginner of any age) patients and proper shooting tecniques rather than just spray and pray.

homerm14
12-20-2008, 9:33 AM
My grandpa gave me my first .22 when I was 7. However I lived on a farm and had lots of open space to shoot and hunt on.

professorhard
12-20-2008, 9:57 AM
I agree with starting them on a single shot so that they can really learn the basics. I'd also consider the single slightly safer than a semi for a first gun. Then when they finally get a semi they will appreciate not having to load every round individually every shot.

CSACANNONEER
12-20-2008, 10:02 AM
I agree with starting them on a single shot so that they can really learn the basics. I'd also consider the single slightly safer than a semi for a first gun. Then when they finally get a semi they will appreciate not having to load every round individually every shot.

Or, they will see that a semi is not the best gun for everything.

emc002
12-20-2008, 10:19 AM
My son started at 5 with a Henry Mini-Bolt.

wolf13
12-20-2008, 10:21 AM
I got a BB gun when I was in 2nd grade, but was always around firearms. I shot my first real gun when I was about 5, and loved it. It wasn't a matter of age for my parents, so much as my size. As soon as I was big enough to handle the little .410, I got to shoot it.

I think it all depends on the maturity of the child. When I got my BB gun, and everyone said to put it up to my shoulder, and see how it felt, I looked at them like they were crazy. I didn't know if it was loaded, didn't know how that exact gun worked, and I KNEW there was no safe place to aim it. (Was in SF, where the houses are smashed together) Looking back on that, it really shows me how much my parents, and family enforced the gun rules.

If you think they are mature enough, then why not? To me this isn't an age question, as I know people my age who aren't mature enough to own guns. There is no set limit, just like at 16, nothing changes for everyone, but they can still drive a car.

Jpach
12-20-2008, 6:13 PM
I first started shooting when visiting family in New Mexico at about the age of 6. From then on I was hooked. I shot BB and pellet guns, .22s and some shotguns out in NM and after that my dad busted out the .30-40 Krag, then got me a .22 magnum, then a mini-30, and so on. If I hadnt had access to so many pellet/BB guns and real firearms (under supervision), then I wouldnt be the person I am today. Please PLEASE get your kid a .22 if hes into firearms. He will further learn and understand gun safety and greatly improve his marksmanship skills, and always have something to do. And if you want, get him a pellet rifle. Those things never get old. Also, an AR or an AK shouldnt be too much for your kids to handle, as long as your there of course so please do not rule those options out. Hope that helped

Seesm
12-21-2008, 2:33 AM
As money allows and you are looking for an AR?
Just as much fun to run a 10/22 or start with a used boltgun for under $200

Yeah as money allows... I could go buy 10 ar's If I wanted but at the time it would not be wise... I can buy a lower and build it up as I want as like 80 out of 100 people seem to be doing at this time. A 10/22 would be ok as well as I have mags for that somewhere in my shop. A single shot is what I learned ona nd woudl be great!!

Japedo
12-21-2008, 8:25 AM
I started taking my daughter at 5, she is 8 now. Last year I build her this 22lr

http://i160.photobucket.com/albums/t181/japedo_k/DSC00679.jpg

It is still a little too big for her. I drill a lot of safety, and just a little on the fundamentals. I would rather have her be safe and shooting wrong. I've found when I start putting the fundamentals on thick, she will get annoyed and not have as much fun and get tired with it quick. When I give a couple tips at a time she is more responsive. Most of the time when we go out, I have a Sig Mosquito she likes, I just put a couple bowling pins a short distance away and she tries to knock them down.

Sacjesusfreak
12-21-2008, 4:09 PM
thats a great age to teach them safty ettiquete and proper dicipline for the firearm.

Blue
12-21-2008, 4:11 PM
I started my kid way too young at 4. I say get him a Red Ryder and practice in the back yard for a little while.

Seesm
12-21-2008, 9:15 PM
yeah they have those already... That pink ar22 is bad *** my lady would love that... My kids woudl love that is it was a "black rifle" :)

7x57
12-24-2008, 9:27 PM
Eric is four and shot grandpa's .22 over Thanksgiving weekend. At that point he could already tell me the rules if he found a gun that wasn't with an adult. Right now every time he sees me pick up a gun (to clean it or something) I ask him "what's the first thing I should do?" He knows now that the answer is "check it!" He's also just about figured out that the finger doesn't go on the trigger until he's ready to pull it because that's how he has to do it if he wants to dry-fire something (I try to be patient about finding the snap-caps and making time).

Here are my principles:

1. It's all about learning safety, and then having fun within the rules. I don't try to tell him how to hit stuff right now.

2. He's never actually *trusted* with anything--my hands are always on the gun, etc. I don't rely on him actually understanding or obeying the rules, and if all he can do is parrot them now that's enough. I don't want him to know that's how it is, but...that's how it is.

3. All fun comes from following the rules. If we can't obey the rules and daddy, we don't get to have this kind of fun anymore. Obedience at the range is serious business, and you can't ask "why" until after you've started doing what you're told. Afterwards, daddy is supposed to try to answer "why" patiently even if he's been asked eleventy times already.

5. If we're trying to listen and obey within the capabilities of a four-year-old, then daddy has to remember to be patient so it stays fun. Admittedly, a string of multiple bathroom breaks while I'm trying to sight in tests that rule pretty severely.

I forgot one:

Rule zero: most of Eric's ancestors were farmers and ranchers who used a rifle as a man's normal, unremarkable, everyday tool. They didn't expect the police to keep them safe either, and figured nobody had the right to bother them since they didn't bother anyone else. *Nobody* is ever going to get away with trying to make him ashamed of his people or their way of life.

BTW, brass scrounging turns out to be fun for a little guy. I called him that several times, and on the way home he asked me "what do brass scroungers do with their brass?" :-) In the interest of not *entirely* earning a "dangerous gun nut" reputation, I wasn't so pleased when he gave some empty .223 cases to my lady neighbor for a present, however. Be interesting to know what she thought of that. =8-O

He's actually shot my .44 cap & ball revolver too. I have to hold and point everything, so at this point it doesn't matter much if it's a handgun or a rifle (except the rifle is easier to get four hands on--the .44 was about as much as I can control with my fingertips while still giving him room to pull the trigger.

The thing I liked least about having him at the range was that when I shoot, there is at least a second or two where I'm focused on the sights and target, not on knowing exactly where he is. I wouldn't have been willing to do it, but he was very good about not crossing the painted lines or even looking like he might cross them.

7x57

SD13
12-24-2008, 11:05 PM
Whenever the parent feels the child is responsible enough I suppose, there's no definite answer. I think its good to expose a child to firearms and what guns actually do, and how to handle them from a young age. The more the kid knows the better and if they grow up around guns and know safety and how to properly handle one it wont have that oooohhh ahhhhh effect that it would have had they just been exposed to guns in movies and stuff their whole life.

Seesm
12-26-2008, 8:33 PM
Eric is four and shot grandpa's .22 over Thanksgiving weekend. At that point he could already tell me the rules if he found a gun that wasn't with an adult. Right now every time he sees me pick up a gun (to clean it or something) I ask him "what's the first thing I should do?" He knows now that the answer is "check it!" He's also just about figured out that the finger doesn't go on the trigger until he's ready to pull it because that's how he has to do it if he wants to dry-fire something (I try to be patient about finding the snap-caps and making time).

Here are my principles:

1. It's all about learning safety, and then having fun within the rules. I don't try to tell him how to hit stuff right now.

2. He's never actually *trusted* with anything--my hands are always on the gun, etc. I don't rely on him actually understanding or obeying the rules, and if all he can do is parrot them now that's enough. I don't want him to know that's how it is, but...that's how it is.

3. All fun comes from following the rules. If we can't obey the rules and daddy, we don't get to have this kind of fun anymore. Obedience at the range is serious business, and you can't ask "why" until after you've started doing what you're told. Afterwards, daddy is supposed to try to answer "why" patiently even if he's been asked eleventy times already.

5. If we're trying to listen and obey within the capabilities of a four-year-old, then daddy has to remember to be patient so it stays fun. Admittedly, a string of multiple bathroom breaks while I'm trying to sight in tests that rule pretty severely.

I forgot one:

Rule zero: most of Eric's ancestors were farmers and ranchers who used a rifle as a man's normal, unremarkable, everyday tool. They didn't expect the police to keep them safe either, and figured nobody had the right to bother them since they didn't bother anyone else. *Nobody* is ever going to get away with trying to make him ashamed of his people or their way of life.

BTW, brass scrounging turns out to be fun for a little guy. I called him that several times, and on the way home he asked me "what do brass scroungers do with their brass?" :-) In the interest of not *entirely* earning a "dangerous gun nut" reputation, I wasn't so pleased when he gave some empty .223 cases to my lady neighbor for a present, however. Be interesting to know what she thought of that. =8-O

He's actually shot my .44 cap & ball revolver too. I have to hold and point everything, so at this point it doesn't matter much if it's a handgun or a rifle (except the rifle is easier to get four hands on--the .44 was about as much as I can control with my fingertips while still giving him room to pull the trigger.

The thing I liked least about having him at the range was that when I shoot, there is at least a second or two where I'm focused on the sights and target, not on knowing exactly where he is. I wouldn't have been willing to do it, but he was very good about not crossing the painted lines or even looking like he might cross them.

7x57


It sounds like you are a great parent and doing a fine job with Eric. I enjoyed the read alot. Happy Holidays!!

pilejay
12-27-2008, 8:14 AM
Don't believe there is no age minimum... as long as we, the parents, are responsible enough to know what is too much of a gun for the child it's all good. Not putting a .45 in a little kids hands is what I'm talking about. Too many of times I've heard about those stories that just bother me...

other than that have fun and be responsible....

nicki
12-28-2008, 2:40 AM
Alot depends on size, maturity and emotional stability of you child.

If you have a child who is on Prozac, has ADD or other issues, you may want to avoid them having any access to guns.

Assuming you don't have those issues, I would say probably ages 7 to 10 is when most kids will express some interest.

22s are good rounds to start with because of low cost and low recoil.

When I was a kid I thought lever action guns like the cowboys had were the coolest thing. Of course westerns like the rifleman and gunsmoke were common on TV and we wanted to be like them.

I'm not a fan of single shot rifles, however I think bolt actions or lever actions are preferable to semi autos for first guns.

My kids still pass on the larger caliber guns, my son (age19) has no interest at all in shooting, he prefers his video games and my daughter(age20) only likes to shoot my 22s.

Whatever you do, make sure the kids have fun. If you take the fun out, they will not want to shoot.

Nicki

_Odin_
12-29-2008, 10:13 AM
When I have a kid and when he/she is old enough (8-12) I'll give him/her my GSG-5 :D

SD13
12-29-2008, 1:41 PM
When I have a kid and when he/she is old enough (8-12) I'll give him/her my GSG-5 :D

when i have a child he/she too will have the knowledge/skills to defend themselves from any harm instilled in them from the time they can walk.

not too mention its always good to give kids something "grown up" to take part in, gives them a little sense of responsibility.

pingpong
12-29-2008, 2:35 PM
when i have a child he/she too will have the knowledge/skills to defend themselves from any harm instilled in them from the time they can walk.

not too mention its always good to give kids something "grown up" to take part in, gives them a little sense of responsibility.

+1. I too believe that introducing kids to some of the more "dangerous" aspects of life in a controlled and safe environment is much more beneficial to society. Of course, it all depends on the kid; if my kid doesn't like following rules, I'll be damned if I let them anywhere near a gun until they learn responsibility and consequences.

Learning proper gun safety and skills early on definitely should translate into a responsible and safe gun-toting adult. Another positive is that at those earlier ages, kids will follow rules because they are rules imposed by authority, rather than having to fully comprehend and understand it. This increases the likelihood that they will follow these same rules to the letter later on in life. Gun safety is something that should never be compromised; this early exposure, I believe, is one way to achieve that goal.

The same case can be applied to lots of other things to (alcohol, for example).

CSACANNONEER
12-29-2008, 2:39 PM
When I have a kid and when he/she is old enough (8-12) I'll give him/her my GSG-5 :D

Why the ":D"? I handed my GSG5 to a friend's 9 year old daughter a couple of weeks ago. Hell, I had my stepson shooting 50's and belt-feds by the time he turned 12 and I had only met him and started teaching him how to shoot about the time he turned 11. Of course, he had already proven that he was responsible and proficient with single shot rimfires before I let him shoot handguns, semis or the big guns.

Seesm
12-30-2008, 12:00 AM
I have settled on getting my 7 year old a bazooka and my 5 year old a 50 cal...

I know I know the cali gun law are tricky :) but WTF you only live once!! :) Just kidding!!

But seriously we are waiting a bit longer and we may go "cricket" 22 to start them off there "red riders" Or with a 10/22 like I had years ago when I got out of guns... Replacing what we had is half the fun!!

Like another poster said you have to keep it fun for them!!

AlexBreya
01-02-2009, 11:50 PM
don't get them a cricket, that would just be ridiculous and embarrassing. go with GSG-5s and AR-15s if you want them to have fun and go beast mode. but seriously, a hand grenade would be suffice...

xxxx
01-03-2009, 2:47 AM
I got a "Marksman Air Pistol Pellet/Dart/BB Repeater" When I was in middle school.

Looking at it in the old cardboard box it came in right now - I bet they are still made, I remember shooting it and the velocity was so slow that you could actually track the BB with your eye.

Got a shotgun when I was 18.

Are you trying to train your kid to be an expert marksman or something? If the kid wants a toy - get the kid a toy, these days you have AirSoft - they look just as cool as the real thing but are pretty safe.

I wouldn't give anyone under 18 a firearm unless it was needed for hunting, but I would let my kid shoot one of MY guns and only under MY supervision, other then that I wouldn't even allow him to look at it.

Then again, I don't have kids.

d_hammy
01-03-2009, 6:30 PM
My middle daughter is 13 and she just got her very own handgun, it's a S&W 622. Honestly I have to say I wish I would have started bringing my kids to the range sooner. My oldest 14 and youngest 11 have now followed suit with their sister and now want their own. I know a lot would argue they could shoot mine but when it is their very own they take pride in it and care more about it's upkeep and in my daughters case has even started looking into customizing it with her babysitting money.

In short get your kid his/her own gun that he/she can handle and teach them right the first time. You wont regret it.

Seesm
01-04-2009, 1:42 AM
Are you trying to train your kid to be an expert marksman or something? If the kid wants a toy - get the kid a toy, these days you have AirSoft - they look just as cool as the real thing but are pretty safe.

I wouldn't give anyone under 18 a firearm unless it was needed for hunting, but I would let my kid shoot one of MY guns and only under MY supervision, other then that I wouldn't even allow him to look at it.
Then again, I don't have kids.

My two kids are into guns because I and both Grandpa's are pretty into them...

Mom shot as a young gunner... It's what we like to do along with some sports and Motorcycle stuff.

And I am also teaching them about the whole 2nd amendment rights deal... :)

That is why I named the original post... "What is too young" Just to see what you all thought...

They are very respectful when they shoot and handle the guns great and use teh saftey properly..

Pretty neat really, yeah I would not let them shoot without supervision for sure...

No worries...

I guess teach em right now and they are safer for ever and can maybe teach others...

Dr. Peter Venkman
01-04-2009, 5:54 AM
This is too young:

Q3IEwjKt7Og

xxxx
01-04-2009, 7:34 PM
My two kids are into guns because I and both Grandpa's are pretty into them...

Mom shot as a young gunner... It's what we like to do along with some sports and Motorcycle stuff.

And I am also teaching them about the whole 2nd amendment rights deal... :)

That is why I named the original post... "What is too young" Just to see what you all thought...

They are very respectful when they shoot and handle the guns great and use teh saftey properly..

Pretty neat really, yeah I would not let them shoot without supervision for sure...

No worries...

I guess teach em right now and they are safer for ever and can maybe teach others...

I think kids have two kinds of mentalities; Theirs and Yours.

If you say "Here is your gun for Christmas, but you can only use it when I am around" - it is their gun. I think it is better to say, "I got this gun and I got it so you and I could use it and you can learn - it is mine, but your going to be the main user." - They know it is YOUR gun and they won't think twice about messing with your things.

GuyW
01-04-2009, 9:59 PM
My son was interested in guns and hunting. He shot (infrequently) with me at a range, and had a BB rifle....but all that only inflamed his itch...

I found out that although kids can't hunt "big game" in CA until 13 (IIRC), they can hunt non-game animals and game birds at any age (that they can pass Hunter Safety). In particular, turkeys (ie, big enough to interest us).

So he did his Hunter safety at 10+, and he started hunting turkeys at 11 with his own single shot 12 ga. He soon had a couple of other rifles and shotguns.

His younger sister started hunting at 12 with her own .410 single shot (she's just physically smaller). At 13 she got her own .380 pistol.

Knowing them, and what I know now, I should have started them at least 1-2 years earlier (just too damn busy...). BTW, they are (and were) very level-headed kids, and totally serious about gun safety and hunter ethics.

Single shots are best to instill discipline, "one shot, one kill"...

YMMV
.

ivanimal
01-04-2009, 10:56 PM
My son wanted to shoot since 5 but I waited till he was 7 and calmed down a bit he did not really get into it till he was 10. Now at 13 he believes all of my guns are his.:) Well they will be if I dont sell them or trad ethem for other guns:D.

Captain Evilstomper
01-04-2009, 11:20 PM
when i was 6 i started with a browning .22, the next summer i begged dad until he let me shoot his M1 carbine :) it's been downhill since then.!

Seesm
01-05-2009, 12:53 AM
That kid was for sure too young to shoot that M1 Carbine by himself.

The way he would drop it and pop it up in the air could have been a wild for someone if he slipped on the trigger I think.

Mom videoing and Dad helping him would have been better for 1-2 shots... 8 shots is too much for a kid that size.

But it's Texas... If I lived there I may have my kids running full autos... JK :)

GuyW
01-05-2009, 1:27 AM
That kid was for sure too young to shoot that M1 Carbine by himself.

Making that kid shoot that Garand after the first shot was child abuse...

.

d_hammy
01-05-2009, 6:04 PM
Making that kid shoot that Garand after the first shot was child abuse...

.

Is it really child abuse when the kid is laughing? I'm not saying it was the smartest thing in the world but he didn't act like he wanted to stop.

CSACANNONEER
01-05-2009, 6:57 PM
That kid was for sure too young to shoot that M1 Carbine by himself.

The way he would drop it and pop it up in the air could have been a wild for someone if he slipped on the trigger I think.

Mom videoing and Dad helping him would have been better for 1-2 shots... 8 shots is too much for a kid that size.

But it's Texas... If I lived there I may have my kids running full autos... JK :)

If he was shooting a M1 Carbine, he would have been fine. Even if he had the stock shortened to fit him and was shown a proper shooting stanze, he would have done OK with the M1 Garand. but the parents were complete IDIOTS for letting him shoot a gun that didn't fit him right and one which he was unable to maintain proper muzzle control.

I spent last saturday at Angeles with my cousins. It was there first time firing firearms. I wish I had a Cricket or Henry's to teach them with. It's hard to teach proper shouldering of a long gun when the stock is too long for them.
http://img224.imageshack.us/img224/8489/ben1919012or6.th.jpg (http://img224.imageshack.us/my.php?image=ben1919012or6.jpg)
http://img224.imageshack.us/img224/8526/ben1919009nb0.th.jpg (http://img224.imageshack.us/my.php?image=ben1919009nb0.jpg)
http://img224.imageshack.us/img224/2143/ben1919002xw9.th.jpg (http://img224.imageshack.us/my.php?image=ben1919002xw9.jpg)
http://img224.imageshack.us/img224/8884/ben1919003gj9.th.jpg (http://img224.imageshack.us/my.php?image=ben1919003gj9.jpg)

sorensen440
01-05-2009, 7:02 PM
as soon as they can understand what your telling them as long as you are right there with them 100% of the time

Seesm
01-05-2009, 8:02 PM
Csa cannoneer what is that tripod gun... The one with the folder is a gsg right? Very cool... They look pumped!!

strangerdude
01-05-2009, 8:45 PM
I don't believe there is an age limit to start shooting, maybe a sense of maturity and interest is something to look for. My dad started me on a .22 rifle when I was three, but he also taught me how to handle firearms later on in grade school, he taught me what the consequences can be if misused, and to know that a firearms is not a toy.

gsusd
01-05-2009, 9:12 PM
In my opinion, it is too young for get to learn how to use weapon before 18 years of age.

sorensen440
01-05-2009, 9:24 PM
In my opinion, it is too young for get to learn how to use weapon before 18 years of age.

seriously ??
that's why we have so many 18yos who don't have a clue at the range

Seesm
01-06-2009, 1:02 AM
In my opinion, it is too young for get to learn how to use weapon before 18 years of age.

Come on now... You must be kidding...

Maybe for you 17 was too young and at 18 it was all good for you BUT, if you can drive a car here at 16...

I might think you saying 16 is a good opinion (FOR YOU), but seriously.

If the kid is with a adult and that person is a decent shooter they can do it pretty young, anything in life is best learned when young.

CSACANNONEER
01-06-2009, 5:03 AM
My 1919 was on the tripod.

As far as 18 years old to learn to shoot? Give me a break. I think that firearms safety should be a mandatory subject in our public schools by the age of 8! Instead of the "don't touch, go tell an adult" BS that they teach, proper firearms safety and handling would keep the curiousity levels down and would save lives.

vormav
01-06-2009, 10:34 AM
nothing wrong with starting kids at an earlier age learning proper safety and handeling. my dad took me out around 8 or 9 and i had a lever action single shot .22, i had a blast with that thing. he tought me everything i needed to know so that when i hit 16 and took my hunter safety course, i aced it, did the best out of anyone else there, including the 30 year old dudes.

like alot of people here were saying, it all depends on the kids, as the parent you just gotta recognize when you think they're ready.

psum240b
01-07-2009, 12:06 AM
When I was 5, I shot my dads 32 revolver, of course he was right there holding the gun with me, and I remember being scared. Then when I was 7 he gave me a BB gun which I didn't use until age 10 because I didn't care about guns at the time, but getting involved with boy scouts and those single shot 22's was awesome at age 10. After that its been downhill ever sense:D My old man gave me a 10/22 when I was 14 and had a blast with it. When I turned 16 my mom and uncle bought me a bushmaster ar15, (mom grew up in the country). I think its awesome to see parents supervising there kids at the range teaching them on 22's learning the basics. Sounds like your doing a good job.

7x57
01-10-2009, 11:34 AM
In my opinion, it is too young for get to learn how to use weapon before 18 years of age.

If you believe that, then Sarah Brady's work is already half-done. The "kids and guns don't mix" line is designed, I imagine intentionally, to break the gun culture. It's also reckless endangerment, IMO, because that's how you *really* cause accidents.

How did they do it when guns were normal? Kids got a .22 for their sixth birthday and went bunny hunting (there's a nice picture at corneredcat.com or something like that). Future president John Quincy Adams was doing the manual of arms with a musket that was taller than he was....

My brother pointed out to me that we used to live in a small Montana town where every street had an unlocked parked pickup with a loaded rifle in plain view of children playing. Nobody *ever* messed with them.

Your choice on who knew more about raising kids to be safe with guns: umpteen generations of people who raised ten-child families with guns, or Sarah Brady.

The gun culture--pass it on. "It's for the children." :-)

7x57

TonyKat
01-10-2009, 4:04 PM
no age is too young if they're with an adult...I would set them free at age 10 with a bb gun....what's the worst that can happen, broken window, dead bird, eh...just instill the importance of not shooting others and wearing safety glasses.

When i was little my grandpa threw sand in my face once or twice to show the importance of safety glasses. I will never forget that, and I will never forget to wear them.

7x57
01-10-2009, 9:27 PM
Came across these photos (http://bullshop.gunloads.com/photos.html) on the web pages of a custom bullet caster in Alaska. How young is too young? From the picture, it looks like somewhere less than two. :-)

The only thing I like more than those pictures of the kids with daddy are the possibility of anti-hunters hyperventilating over his pictures of dead critters. It's the good life up there in Alaska, though if it's seven miles to the mailbox I'm pretty sure net access is not so hot. :-)

7x57

AlliedArmory
01-12-2009, 5:17 PM
nothing wrong with teaching them at a young age. just my personal opinion, i wouldnt teach my kids how to shoot til maybe 12-14 yrs old

CSDGuy
01-12-2009, 5:57 PM
If you believe that, then Sarah Brady's work is already half-done. The "kids and guns don't mix" line is designed, I imagine intentionally, to break the gun culture. It's also reckless endangerment, IMO, because that's how you *really* cause accidents.

How did they do it when guns were normal? Kids got a .22 for their sixth birthday and went bunny hunting (there's a nice picture at corneredcat.com or something like that). Future president John Quincy Adams was doing the manual of arms with a musket that was taller than he was....

My brother pointed out to me that we used to live in a small Montana town where every street had an unlocked parked pickup with a loaded rifle in plain view of children playing. Nobody *ever* messed with them.

Your choice on who knew more about raising kids to be safe with guns: umpteen generations of people who raised ten-child families with guns, or Sarah Brady.

The gun culture--pass it on. "It's for the children." :-)

7x57
I would re-write that line as "Untrained kids and guns do not mix."

When she's ready, I'll pass on the gun culture to my daughter... she'll be six soon and not quite ready right now.

7x57
01-12-2009, 9:11 PM
I would re-write that line as "Untrained kids and guns do not mix."


True--though taken strictly, you can't train them, as that would involve mixing untrained kids and guns. :-)

What bothers me is actually untrained *parents*. It's quite easy to screw up, if *you're* a screw up. :-) Really young, you have to assume they will do anything and everything and be ready to ensure safety regardless of what they do, otherwise you couldn't start the training. That means whoever is teaching them needs to be ensuring the safety of two people while demonstrating the right way at all times. If they are not well enough trained, then it's a disaster waiting to happen.

I can recall parents I *really* don't ever want to see teaching safety.


When she's ready, I'll pass on the gun culture to my daughter... she'll be six soon and not quite ready right now.

That's the way. Part of the original process was that daddy's word was law. Shooting was a privilege you earned at his sole discretion and judgment. All fun comes from following the rules and satisfying the teacher.

7x57

gsusd
01-12-2009, 9:40 PM
In my opinion again, 18 years of age is about right time to get to know weapons (guns).

There are things that kids can learn quickly; there are other things that requires very long time to learn. It is up to parents to set the priorities for their children. At the age of 18, they can pretty much decide what are the priorities in their lives and on their own. Let them take over from there.

By exposing the kids to weapons and Lead at early age is no good for their health either.

Fullfiling life itself is like filling a cup full of rocks, stones and sand. Let's fill it up with big rocks first, then comes smaller stones, and finally grains of sand.

Seesm
01-15-2009, 12:36 AM
PpphuudddddD

CSACANNONEER
01-15-2009, 5:08 AM
In my opinion again, 18 years of age is about right time to get to know weapons (guns).

There are things that kids can learn quickly; there are other things that requires very long time to learn. It is up to parents to set the priorities for their children. At the age of 18, they can pretty much decide what are the priorities in their lives and on their own. Let them take over from there.

By exposing the kids to weapons and Lead at early age is no good for their health either.

Fullfiling life itself is like filling a cup full of rocks, stones and sand. Let's fill it up with big rocks first, then comes smaller stones, and finally grains of sand.

WOW!! Are you kidding? How long have you known Sarah Brady? I think you have it totally backwards. Why would you want to keep firearms a mystery to kids? If they get to know how to properly handle and respect firearms at a young age, they will be a lot less likely to be invovled in a firearm related mishap.

Seesm
01-15-2009, 11:39 AM
WOW!! Are you kidding? How long have you known Sarah Brady? I think you have it totally backwards. Why would you want to keep firearms a mystery to kids? If they get to know how to properly handle and respect firearms at a young age, they will be a lot less likely to be invovled in a firearm related mishap.

Here here +1000

AlexBreya
01-15-2009, 11:57 AM
In my opinion, it is too young for get to learn how to use weapon before 18 years of age.

Are you serious? I'm 17 (got my first gun when i was 16) and I'm 100% positive that I know how to use all 7 of the guns that my family has. If you know anyone above the age of 15 who can't learn how to shoot/be familiar with any gun within 15 minutes, than that kid is just an idiot. btw, a knife is a weapon, so if you don't think that you should be allowed to use a knife until you're 18, you're just being ridiculous.

CSACANNONEER
01-15-2009, 12:41 PM
Are you serious? .............If you know anyone above the age of 15 who can't learn how to shoot/be familiar with any gun within 15 minutes, than that kid is just an idiot.

If anyone thinks that 15 minutes is all it takes to properly and safely learn to handle/shoot a firearm then, they are an idiot! Maybe, after proper instuctions on the basics of firearms handling, 15 minutes per weapon could be concievable. But, if you (a 17 year old) think that 15 minutes of training is all someone needs to be safe and proficent with firearms, I'd have to side with gsusd and go further by saying that even 18 is too young. I really hope you just didn't comunicate your thoughts well.

Justin562
01-16-2009, 11:14 AM
A single shot or a lever action repeater 22 lr would suit you children better than the battle guns they desire... Baby steps man!:D
I forget who makes it; I think savage made a survival o/u type .22lr over a 20 gauge. I "played" with one when I was 10 years old, I liked it alot.
I also had a single shot bolt action 22 lr. which I feel made me into a decent target shooter today. You tend to focus more on hitting the target knowing you only have one shot. On the plus side you'll save money on ammo;)
I wish my pops impared shooting with me at a younger age...instead my friends dad taught me. My Mother made my Father sell all his guns once My Sister and I was born:rolleyes: It kinda bums me out knowing that

PTMATTESON
01-17-2009, 11:36 AM
my grandson

sorensen440
01-17-2009, 11:38 AM
I think someone is just jealous at the 15 yo's outshooting them ;)

Seesm
01-22-2009, 1:18 AM
I think someone is just jealous at the 15 yo's outshooting them ;)

:) Yup

CSACANNONEER
01-22-2009, 5:20 AM
I love it when new young shooters outshoot me. It's specially nice when I've been the one training them from the start.

Seesm
01-24-2009, 12:45 AM
My 5 yr old is deadly with his "Red Rider"... He plink cans like a mad man and just giggles when he hits stuff he hits more than his 8 yr old brother...

SMP2010
01-24-2009, 9:34 AM
If anyone thinks that 15 minutes is all it takes to properly and safely learn to handle/shoot a firearm then, they are an idiot! Maybe, after proper instuctions on the basics of firearms handling, 15 minutes per weapon could be concievable. But, if you (a 17 year old) think that 15 minutes of training is all someone needs to be safe and proficent with firearms, I'd have to side with gsusd and go further by saying that even 18 is too young. I really hope you just didn't comunicate your thoughts well.

I disagree. I think teaching your children about guns at an early age is good. It is up to the parent. I would not let my 11 year old go shooting without me, but he has learned to respect and handle guns and that I think will help prevent any gun related mishaps that might come up without me being there. IE; a friends house or other situation. I think waiting until 18 is odd to me, what is magical about the age of 18? I think back to my youth, and I was more mature at 16 than my older brother was at 19. And to this day he still lacks certain traits that I can attribute to my father taking me shooting at an early age. My older brother went too, but he never got from it what I did. Anyhow it is really up to the parent to make that call, and I think it is never too early to teach them safety and responsibility, if you wait they may never really learn it.

CSACANNONEER
01-24-2009, 1:03 PM
I disagree. I think teaching your children about guns at an early age is good. It is up to the parent. I would not let my 11 year old go shooting without me, but he has learned to respect and handle guns and that I think will help prevent any gun related mishaps that might come up without me being there. IE; a friends house or other situation. I think waiting until 18 is odd to me, what is magical about the age of 18? I think back to my youth, and I was more mature at 16 than my older brother was at 19. And to this day he still lacks certain traits that I can attribute to my father taking me shooting at an early age. My older brother went too, but he never got from it what I did. Anyhow it is really up to the parent to make that call, and I think it is never too early to teach them safety and responsibility, if you wait they may never really learn it.

Reread the thread. I agree with you. The post you qouted was my responce to a 17 year old stating that almost any 15 year old can learn how to properly and safely handle a firearm in 15 minutes. I was calling BS since, I don't believe 15 minutes is long enough to train anyone, of any age, properly. Also, go back and look at some of the pictures I've posted in this thread and others. I have introduced many minors to all kinds of firearms including, muzzleloaders, beltfed guns, 50BMG rifles, as well as the standard long guns and handguns in a multitude of calibers. But, I would never feel comfortable teaching any new shooter for 15 minutes and then thinking that they "could shoot" as the young new shooter had implied.

1mean76
02-08-2009, 11:35 PM
i started shootin guns as soon as i was strong enough to hold the gun up and fire it at the same time and i think im ok lol but id tell your kids that if you shoot someone its not like the movies and they wont come back alive

TregoMark
02-16-2009, 8:09 PM
Here's my 8 year old at the Sacramento Valley Shooting Center the other day. I started her out when she was 7 on bolt action .22s and just recently got her the pink 10/22.

http://i47.photobucket.com/albums/f166/thatchweave/DSC02211.jpg

freonr22
02-17-2009, 12:21 PM
my 2 1/2 year old says to me this weekend... "what's this poppa?" i say thats a bullet (.22 sub) so then i realize, lets have her pull the trigger once, aimed @ a hillside 25' in front of us, so i put her finger on the trigger ( i was holding the pistol) and pulled it back , "pop" and she got the biggest smile on her face i;ve ever seen

DDT
02-18-2009, 12:08 AM
but id tell your kids that if you shoot someone its not like the movies and they wont come back alive

One Word: Hunting.

mdouglas1980
02-18-2009, 11:30 PM
Yeah my dad started my brother and I at 7 and 8 shooting his J.C Higginssingle shot that he got when he was 10. I think that if you are taught correctly, you can shoot a guns at a fairly young age. He was always very strict with us about obviously "never pointing it at anyone" and the "never to cross the firing line" rules and we always had lots of fun. I remember even throwing clay pigeons for my dad and his friends around that age too, they loved it since they didn't have to do it lol. I hope to have that experience with my kids one day too.

thomasanelson
03-06-2009, 5:12 PM
Every case is different, but my 5 year old is definately not ready.

Seesm
03-10-2009, 6:18 PM
My 5 yr old is ready with me helping him and working with him... Neither 5 or 8 yr old are ok alone yet....

KimoBBZ
03-10-2009, 9:31 PM
I ask what is too young to have your kids shooting? I know I know it depends on the kids but just your opinion.

Grandpa teaches the safety and I back it up daily basis. My kids are 5 and 7 and shoot there "red riders" at targets in the back yard every few days with a adult ONLY....

Is this too young? I ask because our 7 year old is asking for a AR15, AK 47, Mini 14, M1 Carbine and Garand for Christmas so I am just asking... Because a parent does not want to let him down!! :)

:) Jk on letting him down but he loves shooting, is this normal... I only shoot like 5 times a years so I am not fanatic but I do love this site. Talk to me.

Totally normal... get a bunch of 5 year olds together and invariably the boys will get in to gun related play before too long.... ACTUAL shooting w/ Dad or Grandpa?? ALL OVER IT.

Here's a related thread I started on the subject awhile back... some useful perspectives:

http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/showthread.php?t=122103

Sooo... How old were YOU when you 1st lit off a live round? Was it a memorable event (positive or other-wise), please share?

Daughter is turning 4 in November, and while I'm anxious to get her to the range for some prone .22LR sessions, I realize she's not there maturity-wise. Maybe @ 5 or 6.

She's great so far with understanding boundries concerning the big & small safes around the house and safety issues. But not quite there yet on patience and attention span.

She's quite comfortable with my airsoft and cardboard targets out back, but is only attentive for about 10 shots... when a butterfly or birdie distracts her.

mif_slim
03-12-2009, 11:58 AM
I dont think I'll let my 5 year old son start shooting, thats 5 more years before he starts to shoot. :)

But, I have taught my 4 year old niece how to sort and reload ammo. Not really load but the basics of it and shes pretty intrested in it. I however had taught my Nephew (6 years old) how to shoot an bow-n-arrow and he has pretty good at it. He wouldnt shoot it unless Im around to guide him. Really, the parents will know when their kids are ready to shoot. Some can shoot at 5, some can shoot at 18, it really depends, some even on here and other forums started shooting at 35+ years old so theres really no set age to start shooting.

Rob454
03-12-2009, 2:13 PM
I ask what is too young to have your kids shooting? I know I know it depends on the kids but just your opinion.

.

IMO Too Young is a hot hooker in china. LOL

Well to tell you the truth the only time I think its too young is when they dont understand what a gun is. Any kid over the age of 5 should be taught firearms and safety of firearms. any kid younger than that probably cant hold load or shoot the gun and thats just because they cant physically hold the weapon and they probably dont really understand what it is.
I was givem my first gun at about 7-8 YO. but I knew abotu guns since I was 5.
Rob

radio2
04-09-2009, 9:45 AM
I have two boys 6&9 that shoot 22's on a regular basis. I bought my oldest son a savage cub bolt, single shot at 7 years old and now at 9 his grandfarther bought him a Henry lever action 22 and my 6 year old shoots the savage cub. I think it's important to teach them to make every shot count rather than than just sending alot of rounds down range. Youth model rifles fit them well and I just found out that remington and mossberg make youth model 20 GA pump shotguns. My oldest will get one this year when he turns 10. As far as him going hunting with me I will wait till he is 12. Both my sons are very responsable and have been tout the safe handling of a firearm.

hnoppenberger
04-10-2009, 12:22 AM
buy up some guns and sit on them until they are older.

no young child deserves to have an AR until at least mid teens. they have not paid their dues. and then i would say most at 16 still have not paid their dues.

get some nice stuff, the stuff that will most likely get banned, and just sit on it. future christmas presents.

no reason they shouldnt be rocking those red riders for many years at this point.

Seesm
04-10-2009, 12:31 AM
Yeah for sure a good idea, I need a few Ar's to save fo rthem. They will TOTALLY dig that idea too!!! :) Thanks

AlexBreya
04-10-2009, 12:38 AM
If anyone thinks that 15 minutes is all it takes to properly and safely learn to handle/shoot a firearm then, they are an idiot! Maybe, after proper instuctions on the basics of firearms handling, 15 minutes per weapon could be concievable. But, if you (a 17 year old) think that 15 minutes of training is all someone needs to be safe and proficent with firearms, I'd have to side with gsusd and go further by saying that even 18 is too young. I really hope you just didn't comunicate your thoughts well.

My bad, i meant it only takes 15 minutes to be familiar with a specific gun. not 15 minutes to learn all of proper gun safety. In his previous posts he said that people can't learn to be familiar with a firearm until 18, and i called BS. Once you know basic gun safety, knowing how to dissassemble, clean, shoot, and load any single firearm should not take longer than 15 minutes. maybe i have to much faith in the ability of people. Gun safety is only difficult if you don't have any logic.

the2thwizard
04-10-2009, 5:55 AM
My kids are 7 and 9. The younger one loves to shoot. He shoots his Daisy constantly. He started at 6. This summer he will be on a .22LR. Teach kids young! My 2 cents worth.

Mayhem
04-11-2009, 12:53 PM
First gun - Win model 94 30-30 lever action Dad got it for me when I was 4

First Gun shot - Either a shotgun unknown gauge or .22lr both I was around 3 or 4 I Showed a great interest in firearms, Dad wanted to future proof me and got me a 30-30.

First gun purchase by myself - Remington 870 wingmaster I was 16 walked in slapped cash on the counter walked out with my shotgun.

First time Firing a Fully automatic weapon - 17 Years old m16a1 fallowed by the m60 the m2 and the m242

Biggest handgun fired .500 S&W

Biggest Rifle Fired .50bmg

Biggest Gun Fired 25.mm (I'm not counting Mortars artillery rockets or Missiles)

First Reloading kit - Lee @ 37 years old (Ya I know I'm retarded) My dad got it for me.

To date I have never had an accidental discharge with firearm. However my youngest daughter did shoot her younger brother (My oldest son) with a red rider BB gun.

Her excuse was It's only a bb gun, and I didn't know it was loaded.

This prompted me to get a gun safe and treat everything that shoots a projectile the same whether it's a firearm, an airgun, a paintball gun, an airsoft gun, a cross bow, a bow & arrow, or a staple gun. and to teach my children the same.

In all honestly it all depends on the KID. How much interest they show versus How much maturity they show. My youngest child has shown far more intrest than any of my other children.

All my kids learned fast that a Gun is a tool not a Toy. None of them had a toy gun until they new what a real one was and does. The learned how to tell the difference between a real firearm and a toy and what to do with if they come across a real one.

Unfortunately this is not going to work with my youngest boy who is two and as he has already gotten a hold of his older brothers toy guns. He has shown the he doesn't have the same behavior and mentality towards the concept of guns that his older siblings did. This has led me to rethink my doctrine a bit.

Just for the record, I AM AGAINST EVERY GIVING A CHILD A "TOY" GUN. but I have been overridden by my wife and other family members 8(

I honestly believe there is no set age as long as the child is both physically and mentally capable of safely handling the firearm this is going to be different for each child.

My youngest son is probably going to get the pumpkin and the shot gun demonstration.

This is where you take a pumpkin or a watermelon put it on a post or a card board box. Explain to the child that it represents a persons head.

Then shoot it with a shotgun at close range (bout 7 to 21 feet).

Explain to the child this cannot be undone.

Hand them a roll of duct tape and ask them to see if they can fix the pumpkin or Mellon.

They should get a good healthy respect of a firearm's power as well as good understanding of finality of an accident.

Then precede with normal gun safety instruction.

Noobert
04-11-2009, 2:35 PM
to all those who have been outshot: are you more proud of your teaching skills or your shooting skills?

highpowermatch
04-17-2009, 11:00 AM
My Son is 10 has a single shot .22, .17 and 410 my daughter is 8 and got a pink cricket for Christmas last year.

http://i665.photobucket.com/albums/vv18/highpowermatch/reloading%20stuff/gun%20parts/kids%20guns/rossi.jpg
http://i665.photobucket.com/albums/vv18/highpowermatch/reloading%20stuff/gun%20parts/kids%20guns/marlin.jpg
http://i665.photobucket.com/albums/vv18/highpowermatch/reloading%20stuff/gun%20parts/kids%20guns/cricket.jpg

Toyman321
04-20-2009, 8:34 PM
I picked up a pink daisy for my daughter at big 5 this year at their Black Friday sale, she was 4 days old :)

Thinking ahead:thumbsup:

dbar
04-21-2009, 9:55 AM
Teaching gun safety should start young, my Dad taught us to shoot his Ruger Bearcat 22 pistol when I was 4 years old and my brother was 5. I bought my first Red Ryder when I was 7 and Marlin 22 rifle when I was 10 but it all started when my Dad tought us with the Ruger Bearcat (which seemed like a cannon back then), he taught us gun safety and made it fun.

I now have 6 boys of my own and live in OC so we started with paintball and airsoft (gun safety is gun safety) at an early age and this year we want to get everybody Ruger 10/22's $$$ but it adds up $$$

Manong0369
04-25-2009, 11:26 PM
buy up some guns and sit on them until they are older.

no young child deserves to have an AR until at least mid teens. they have not paid their dues. and then i would say most at 16 still have not paid their dues.

get some nice stuff, the stuff that will most likely get banned, and just sit on it. future christmas presents.

no reason they shouldnt be rocking those red riders for many years at this point.


I totally agree with what you are saying. One of the rifles that I made/built is for my 17 year old son. He can't wait until it's official his. He knows that it's his so I am taking to the range as much as possible. His been shooting for about two years, but I continue to remind him of gun safety like a Drill Instructor. My daughter can't wait to get her rifle, she's only 8.

Seesm
04-26-2009, 1:19 AM
D bar u D man!!

Turo
05-03-2009, 6:48 PM
My youngest son is probably going to get the pumpkin and the shot gun demonstration.

This is where you take a pumpkin or a watermelon put it on a post or a card board box. Explain to the child that it represents a persons head.

Then shoot it with a shotgun at close range (bout 7 to 21 feet).

Explain to the child this cannot be undone.

Hand them a roll of duct tape and ask them to see if they can fix the pumpkin or Mellon.

They should get a good healthy respect of a firearm's power as well as good understanding of finality of an accident.

Then precede with normal gun safety instruction.

I Like it! I got the same demo when I was 7 or 8. my dad took a full water bottle and said it was like a head, then proceeded to blast it with the .357 revolver. needless to say I learned my gun safety quick!

As for the OP, my dad felt I was ready for the .117 air rifle when I was about 4 years old, but then I was a pretty respecting kid. but most of the advice given here is good. You'll know when your kid is responsible enough to start shooting, and the idea is that they NEVER shoot without you personally there until they are old enough to buy their own.

shoot, I still don't shoot without my dad with me, and I'm 20 years old lol!

AEC1
05-03-2009, 7:39 PM
My son shot a 22 when he was 7, and shot his first dive with his 20 guage at 9. At 9 he has shot a 9mm, .45, 7.62x54R, AR15, and a .44 Mag. The decision is up to you and what you are comfortable with.

Jerm
05-04-2009, 4:02 PM
My oldest son turned 12 this February in the last month we have had 2 shooting outings the first was Clay shooting with some of my buddies I have a 20 gauge pump youth stock that was my first gun when I was 12 and he is shooting it he had a BB gun but life got complicated and he rarely used it. Yesterday I set up the targets and broke out my Remington fieldmaster 572 pump 22 and started him on target shooting. He is scheduled to take hunter safety class this month and I really think he is at the right age to start although I do believe maturity wise he could have started about 3 years ago. Now my youngest who is 5 while I was shooting with his brother yesterday I brought the red rider and let him try shooting it it is going up for at least another year or two he is no where near ready he cannot focus soley on that task yet. I believe that different children progress differently. My oldest is doing great and with time and patience he will be an excellent shooter. I am trying to make him take his time and not just fire he is learning well we will have a lot of fun times to come shooting together.

bohoki
05-04-2009, 5:00 PM
always liked the "not till your 12 son" line from wily wonka

supermario
05-19-2009, 9:29 PM
I ask what is too young to have your kids shooting? I know I know it depends on the kids but just your opinion.

Grandpa teaches the safety and I back it up daily basis. My kids are 5 and 7 and shoot there "red riders" at targets in the back yard every few days with a adult ONLY....

Is this too young? I ask because our 7 year old is asking for a AR15, AK 47, Mini 14, M1 Carbine and Garand for Christmas so I am just asking... Because a parent does not want to let him down!! :)

:) Jk on letting him down but he loves shooting, is this normal... I only shoot like 5 times a years so I am not fanatic but I do love this site. Talk to me.



My daughter started off with a bb gun, once you see how they handle a bb gun you can get a feel if they are ready for a 22. My daugher is 10 now and i just started her on a p22 and a marlin 22, i think 5 is good to start. I wouldnt go any younger though. As for buying an AR, why not, if it seems too much, just save it til he/she is ready. I would. My daughters are getting 22's this year. If they wanted an AR i would get that but they dont yet;) I know some kids that are more responsible than some adults that i know:eek:

Seesm
05-19-2009, 10:11 PM
My kids are now regularly shooting the 10/22's we have and pretty good with them.... Gotta keep em calm and it stays fun.

DON AUGUSTINE
06-28-2009, 1:07 PM
My son started shooting about 2 years ago. He has been shooting a 10/22 and then started shooting my AR. He has already shot in a couple of rifle matches and a pistol match with a pistol that his Uncle Mike put together. I am almost finished with his first bolt gun that he can shoot in tactical matches, and he cant wait. And no Im not one of the A-hole parents that pushes his kids into things but all he has ever been around are shooters,soldiers and cops since he was born so it was a natural progression for him to go hunting and start competing.
Its great that parents are still letting their kids around firearms and I believe that all kids should be taught at the earliest age possible about the safty,respect and use of guns.

Super Spy
06-28-2009, 1:32 PM
My Dad taught me to shoot a .22 at eight, we were living overseas in a non gun country so my opportunities were only about 2 weeks a year....he used a single shot bolt action .22 and it was one of the "kid size" guns and perfect for a young shooter.

glockwise2000
06-28-2009, 1:52 PM
spray and pray.

I like that.

Ron-Solo
06-30-2009, 7:30 AM
My dad bought my son a .22 lever Browning when he was 9 months old. My dad died a short time later never having seen my son shoot. My son is 25 now and owns several of his own guns, including a CA compliant AR, but his favorite rifle is that Browning .22., which is still in mint condition.

I bought my Grandson a .22 Cricket at age 5 because the 10/22 and Browning were too long for him to properly shoulder and fire safely. He likes my Mini-14 and the AR's, but they are too big for him to shoot without someone helping him hold the rifle.

With the Cricket, he can hold it safely by himself, but he never handles it without direct and immediate supervision. Anytime he is handling a firearm, my attention is directed at him 100%. He practices safe handling, but he is only 6, so multiple levels of safety are accomplished by close supervision.

Also, with a single shot rifle, they can concentrate of their shooting skills because they learn the importance of accuracy. And, if they're going to have an A/D, they are only going to have one before you gain contol of the rifle. Not necessarily so with a semi-auto in any caliber.

The guy in the video having the young boy shooting the Garand was wrong. The boy could barely lift it, let alone handle it safely by himself. A couple of times it looked like he put the muzzle in the dirt. A barrel obstruction has serious consequences. It's videos like these that get the anti's all worked up, because they're not being done safely. When my grandson shoots my Mini-14 or AR, I assist in holding the rifle secure and in a safe direction, making sure it does not get out of control. It that video, I was just waiting for the A/D or the kid to point it at the camera.

As far as age, it depends on the child. My granddaughter will not be ready at the same age my grandson was, I can tell already and she's only 4. She's not going to like it, but she'll have to get used to it.

Picking up some select pieces and holding them until they're able to safely use them and appreciate them is a good idea if you can afford it. Who knows how long it will be before our gun rights are attacked again and you won't be able to get them.

DON AUGUSTINE
06-30-2009, 7:37 AM
One thing you can try with your grandson, if the rifle is a little heavy for him, is to teach him to shoot prone from a bi-pod. Everything was to big or heavy for my son so I put him on the ground with a bi-pod and all he had to concentrate on was being safe and lining up the target.

Eckolaker
06-30-2009, 7:58 AM
Never too young to learn proper firearm safety and usage. It used to be in this country that a boy by the age of 7 could hunt for his own dinner.

covertcombatant
07-11-2009, 10:32 PM
I just wanted to chime in here on kids being to young to shoot. My son who is now 7 has been shooting his Crickett .22 since he was 6 years old. His collection now includes a Ruger MKII .22 handgun and also a just picked up bolt action 410. He loves shooting and has a great respect for it. He cant wait to get out and knock some clay pigeons around with the 410.
Here are some pictures from Rainbow Range on Thursday.

http://img300.imageshack.us/img300/3140/sshoot2.th.jpg (http://img300.imageshack.us/my.php?image=sshoot2.jpg)
http://img300.imageshack.us/img300/7026/sshoottarget.th.jpg (http://img300.imageshack.us/my.php?image=sshoottarget.jpg)
http://img405.imageshack.us/img405/2193/sshoot6.th.jpg (http://img405.imageshack.us/my.php?image=sshoot6.jpg)
http://img189.imageshack.us/img189/699/sshootgood.th.jpg (http://img189.imageshack.us/my.php?image=sshootgood.jpg)
http://img172.imageshack.us/img172/6330/sshoot3.th.jpg (http://img172.imageshack.us/my.php?image=sshoot3.jpg)
http://img189.imageshack.us/img189/2962/sshoot4.th.jpg (http://img189.imageshack.us/my.php?image=sshoot4.jpg)

covertcombatant
07-11-2009, 10:33 PM
http://img300.imageshack.us/img300/2982/sshoot5.th.jpg (http://img300.imageshack.us/my.php?image=sshoot5.jpg)
http://img509.imageshack.us/img509/9755/sshootgoodday.th.jpg (http://img509.imageshack.us/my.php?image=sshootgoodday.jpg)
How can you not love the smile that shooting puts on your child's face.

Turning America back into a Nation of Riflemen…
...one child at a time.

command_liner
07-17-2009, 9:08 AM
Early is good, but it depends on the child.

After looking at a bunch of different rifles, becoming an instructor
and teaching kids, I bought my kids Henry Mini Bolts. The rifles
are stainless, single shot with manual cock. They were 3 and 5 at
the time. A bit later, I worked with the president of Henry to
develop a new peep site configuration for these rifles. Better for
teaching.

It is not in the price book, but if you call Henry, get ahold of the
president and ask for Mini Bolts in the "Perdicaro Peep Site"
configuration, you should be able to get them.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/command_liner

My kids will go through a whole box of 550 22 LR in an afternoon.

The USMC came by our TFT event 2 years back with duty weapons.
My daughter got to shoot a real M4, the one with the 3-position switch.
Yes, a 7-year-old can operate an M4. No problem.

Lancear15
07-17-2009, 9:27 AM
This is too young:

Q3IEwjKt7Og

He is obviously playing it up for the camera.

cedew
07-17-2009, 8:23 PM
Great thread! My daughter is 7 and I'm starting to talk about gun handling/safety with her. She's pretty sharp for her age. I plan to start her with my red rider bb gun. If she enjoys it, I'll consider a .22, but that's months down the road.

I didn't have a bb gun until I was maybe 12, and I was a terror with that thing. It might have helped if I started earlier, so I'm going to try that with my daughter, see how she does.

WeekendWarrior
08-07-2009, 2:30 PM
As soon as you bring your baby home from the hospital?

jggonzalez
08-10-2009, 11:23 AM
I've got my eight year-old daughter started on airsoft guns. I've had her hold my .22s, but the guns seem a little too big for her to handle comfortably. I'm waiting for her to get big enough to handle them easily, then I'll see if she wants to go to the range with me.

black-rifle-kid
02-20-2010, 6:13 PM
i started shooting when i was 5 with a bb gun and i first shot a m14 when i was 7 or 8 but now im addicted to my dads ar15 and his ak

Shooter172
02-21-2010, 3:19 PM
I started at 7 or so. One of my twin daughters at 8 just waits for us to go shooting. She has a Ruger .22 auto, but she really wants a Mosquito she can holster and run like the boys with 1911's... I am very proud of her.;)

Strpd_Up_Brotha
02-22-2010, 5:09 PM
My son keeps asking me......Maybe now i will let him. HE IS GONNA BE JUICED!!!!!!

daveinwoodland
02-22-2010, 5:13 PM
I was 5 when I started shooting a 30 M-1. My Dad has pictures some where of me standing at the range with the carbine that is taller then me. Safety was always drilled into us at a very young age.

chrisw
02-22-2010, 5:16 PM
All my little ones (under 6) know the "rules about guns" and my 5 year old son has shot single shot 22's. I would probably draw the line at 5 though.

Strpd_Up_Brotha
02-22-2010, 7:38 PM
I Drill that into his head now....What you see on T.V. isn't real....Quiz him...He is pretty knowledgeable..SAFETY FIRST!!!!!!!!! Only thing is his mom thinks I'm trying to turn him into a man too soon.

Asmodai
03-09-2010, 11:15 AM
I just took my 7 year old grandson to Angeles Range and helped him shoot my 10/22. He'll need a kid's version because it was too big for him to handle solo. He was pumped! My wife and I piled .22 and .223 rounds into the same target and afterwards gave him the target to take home to show mom and dad. He, of course, claimed all the bulls eyes. As I didn't bring my spotting scope, we gave him the benefit of the doubt :)

delisle
05-27-2010, 1:09 PM
I grew up in a house with a loaded gun behind every door, the first rifle I ever shot was a 22lr Marlin. When I was seven I got a Daisy air rifle and then at 9 I got a my own 22lr Marlin. At 16 I inherited a 12 ga Remington 1100 that I used to bird hunt, kill various varmints around the house, and homeland defense.

We never had any incidents of anyone getting shot accidentally, safety was always first. So I think there is no such thing as being too young.

FireSpitter
05-27-2010, 3:29 PM
My Daughter is 5 and she has been shooting for about a year. She has a single shot .22lr made by chipmunk. I've taught her to handle the rifle much like the Marine Corps teaches things, by saying what you are doing as you do it and doing it the same way every time. I always watch her like a hawk from an arm distance away but she is proving that she is going to be a capable and trustworthy shooter. There are other kids I've met that are much older but far less ready to learn to shoot, it's an individual thing.

antonio
05-27-2010, 11:37 PM
Not 2 young in my opinion........ I was 6 when my Dad bought me my .22lr which i still have and I'm 30 now..:D

Firearms Multimedia Guide
05-31-2010, 4:54 PM
Too young???? Maybe under 10 years.

nat
06-01-2010, 11:38 AM
My son has been shooting since he was 7, he is 10 now. He pays attention and listens to my safety lessons. He new he had to demonstrate a certain level of maturity to get to handle weapons.

WAP
06-02-2010, 7:14 PM
My kids started shooting guns at about 5 or 6. The chipmunk .22 quickly moved to larger calibers, and the 1911/45 is now the gun of choice.
They were taught well and now are avid shooters at 22 and 25 yrs old.
Guns have always been a part of their lives and have never caused a single problem.
One thing though, they never had a toy gun.
Only real, no toys makes it easier to understand.

Divernhunter
06-05-2010, 12:39 PM
My daughter started shooting firearms when she was 4.5 years old. By the time she was 5.5 she had her own 22rf rifle and pistol. By the time she was 8 she had her own centerfire rifle and pistol. Got her first shotgun when she was 12. She is 18 now and her boyfriend is jelous because she has more firearms than he does. She is an excellent shoot
She went hunting with me and helped to gut/skin out a deer when she was 10 and thought it was the greatest thing since sliced bread.

Sunday
06-11-2010, 3:23 PM
I would depend on the child. Probably training should start when interest is shown. It is a big responsibility to shoot guns.

Company 023
07-01-2010, 6:33 PM
Hi,
Get an S&W M&P 22lr it looks like an M-4 but shoots 22lr and its the perfect weapon to grow into. Have someone ELSE (NRA expert with the correct credentials) train your kid. Parents don't always make the best instructors. Good luck,
S East

Theriverjustknows
08-05-2010, 10:36 AM
I started when I was 4ish shooting .22's. I was so let down when I joined cub scouts and had to shoot those sissy bb guns. But at that early age my dad scared the crap outta my with his .44 mag, no way I was gonna touch that thing and get into trouble. With that one shot he taught me guns are not toys and you need to respect the power. Anyways now I'm in my twenties with my own, growing, collection and planning on becoming a gunsmith.

The Orange Order
08-24-2010, 12:39 AM
I had the opportunity to first handle a .45 pistol when I was around the age of 11 or 12 and had safety drilled into me numerous time before being allowed to fire a shot from it. Around that age also is when I started shooting .22 long rifles at Boy Scout summer camps. In addition to that my dad has a sizable collection of pistols and some rifles from his youth so gun safety has always been a well stressed and taught lesson when I was growing up.. It really depends on the individual child; they just have to have the patience and understanding that a firearm is a firearm, not a toy, and it needs to be respected in order to enjoy it without injury.

I think if you start stressing various things like gun safety and help show by example gun safety starting from a young age it shouldn't be too big a problem for a child to have his/her own .22 to shoot. Its always good to start learning those things at a young age from parents rather than at an older age from video games like Call of Duty or Counter-Strike.

Tommy-gun-justin
10-08-2010, 5:52 PM
i've seen some really young children.if you really wanted to start them out.law says you can start them out at age 3 i think

biscuitbarrel
01-25-2011, 2:13 PM
I started my son shooting at age 5. Now he's 12 and he has 2 rifles and a shotgun of his own. Now he is such a good shot it's unreal. I want to put him in a competition.

wbrosha
02-25-2011, 2:24 PM
I started my daughter on her 5th bday with a single shot neon pink cricket 22lr. as long as they are attentive listen and respect what the weapons can do I see nothing wrong with it.

victory19
02-25-2011, 3:00 PM
My Dad started taking me shooting in the FL Everglades (back when it was legal) when I was 5. I shot a .38 special snub nose, Ruger MkII .22 and a Browning HiPower 9mm. Everything was fine, except I would suggest talking about the slide action. The first time I held a semi-auto to shoot, I held it up to my eye, so I could use the sights like a rifle. Good thing my Dad had a fast reaction or my name may be one-eyed McGee. Another tip would be to always wear eye and ear protection, especially those ears since they are still developing. Okay and especially those eyes too... You know... one-eyed McGee...

WAP
03-17-2011, 6:23 PM
Started both my son and daughter at about 5. They are 24 and 29 now, and still avid shooters. Can't wait to teach my grandkids.

Lost.monkey
03-18-2011, 1:29 PM
I held off until the kids could recite the 4 weapons safety rules back to me verbatim.

Just got out last weekend, he's 9 and she's 10.