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yellowfin
12-19-2008, 1:35 AM
My wonderful wife and family got us a trip to a steelhead fishing clinic a little less than a month from today in northern CA. I'm so thrilled but very vaguely aware of what to expect. I've fished all my life and in a lot of places but this is completely new to me. So far I've gathered we need:

1. Fly rod and reel, obviously.
2. Tippets and leaders.
3. Waders
4. Sunglasses.
5. Change of clothes.
6. Backpack and dry bag.
7. Flies
8. Hemostats
9. landing net (?)
10. water and snacks
11. thermal underwear––It gets cold in cold water, I know that much.
12. rain gear

What else? We'll be guided for the first day or so then on our own thereafter. What kind of flies to bring? I don't think we'll need bug spray in January, right? I'm wanting to be as well prepared as possible.

Gnome
12-19-2008, 1:55 AM
She's a keeper, I'll tell you that much. Congrats. As far as what to take, it looks like you have the basics covered. If you're still concerned, just call the outfitters themselves, run your list by them, and they'll tell you what is needed/not needed.

The one thing you forgot was A Camera w/extra batteries.. If digital, take a disposable as a backup.

Have fun!

aplinker
12-19-2008, 1:45 PM
Congrats! Where are you going? Sac system or tributaries? Coastal river? Trinity?

Depending on which river, it can be EXTREMELY cold. I fished a week ago on the Trinity and the frost never melted on the shore. I'm NEVER cold and I was shivering after about 6 hours of being waist deep in it.

The biggest suggestion I have for you is to bring a GPS. You'll want it to mark spots you fish - especially if you float - so you can find them later by land.

Pay attention to where you fish. Steelhead water looks nothing like trout or salmon holes.

Depending on where you fish, techniques change. If you're going to be swinging flies, you might want sinking tip line.

Also, what rod(s) are you bringing and will they have extra equipment?

My wonderful wife and family got us a trip to a steelhead fishing clinic a little less than a month from today in northern CA. I'm so thrilled but very vaguely aware of what to expect. I've fished all my life and in a lot of places but this is completely new to me. So far I've gathered we need:

1. Fly rod and reel, obviously.
2. Tippets and leaders.
3. Waders
4. Sunglasses.
5. Change of clothes.
6. Backpack and dry bag.
7. Flies
8. Hemostats
9. landing net (?)
10. water and snacks
11. thermal underwear––It gets cold in cold water, I know that much.
12. rain gear

What else? We'll be guided for the first day or so then on our own thereafter. What kind of flies to bring? I don't think we'll need bug spray in January, right? I'm wanting to be as well prepared as possible.

yellowfin
12-20-2008, 2:23 AM
We'll be on the Trinity River, using 8 weight Temple Forks and Redingtons. The shop said floating lines, so that's what we'll use, as I don't currently own sinking tip lines but will if necessary. Have already been advised on cold water effect: I used to whitewater kayak in cold rivers in the winter, so I know that polypro longjohns are the way to go and will get some for the wife. Got some fly recommendations?

aplinker
12-20-2008, 4:12 AM
We'll be on the Trinity River, using 8 weight Temple Forks and Redingtons. The shop said floating lines, so that's what we'll use, as I don't currently own sinking tip lines but will if necessary. Have already been advised on cold water effect: I used to whitewater kayak in cold rivers in the winter, so I know that polypro longjohns are the way to go and will get some for the wife. Got some fly recommendations?

Sounds like you're pretty well prepped.

Trinity is all about nymphing - which I think is more fun that swinging. You're GTG with just the floater. The best fishing is in riffles and runs, so there's not as much water to "search" as some other rivers.

Trin steelhead aren't real picky. If they're on the bite they'll eat anything. Princes, copper johns, beaded hare's or bird's nest or APs or golden stones... Egg flies produce, too. Don't go too big on anything.

You're a bit oversticked with an 8 - I use a long 6 or 7wt. The extra length helps with the big roll casts and mending the line. You'll want to know how to feed LOTS of line - big drifts are the norm (70-90ft or more). Don't neglect the swing at the end, though. Seriously, this fishing is all about line control.

Yeah, definitely double up on your under wader insulation - especially for the wife.

yellowfin
12-21-2008, 12:42 AM
Not too big, eh? What sizes are appropriate? I can start tying stuff right away if it's hooks I have already. Weighted patterns I gather, right, or no? Long drifts no problem. How are the casting distances? I gotta get everything up to speed with me; got casting instructions from the Orvis guys as part of the package so that'll get her going good enough.