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Bug Splat
12-17-2008, 12:09 PM
This happened to me last weekend. Was firing my OLL when my rifle jammed. A 9mm case was stuck in my chamber. I start looking around to see what dumb a** eject a 9mm case in my chamber (and buy him a beer for the nice shot) but saw no one on the line shooting pistol rounds. I can't figure out what happened so I just moved on and charged another round in. Round went half way in and stopped. I charged again and next round did the same thing. Then a big sinking feeling hit me. that "9mm" case was the bottom half of the rest of the case stuck in the chamber. It was a LC brass too which are very thick. This has never happened to me before. Anyone else experience this?

If anyone is wondering I did get it out by using a large bolt-out bit that I welded to the end of a 12 inch socked extension. Came out after a few turns and the chamber walls were untouched.

ocabj
12-17-2008, 12:16 PM
Case head separation. Reloaded ammo?

Happens occasionally when the headspace of the case is quite a bit less than the headspace of the chamber, and using reloaded ammo.

Bug Splat
12-17-2008, 12:32 PM
yeah reloaded rounds but brass was only once fired. Maybe I missed a defect in that one. I check the rim shoulders and neck on cases but never deeply inspect the body. live and learn I guess.

ocabj
12-17-2008, 12:38 PM
It may be once fired, but:

1. Where was the brass fired from originally?

2. What is the headspace of the ammo vs the headspace of the chamber?

Many times, the reloaded ammo has a headspace that is far less than the chamber of the rifle. When fired, it stretches to expand to the chamber. You can alleviate the stress of stretching by setting your die to size the shoulder .002" less than the fired measurement.

http://www.inlandshooters.net/gallery2/d/763-2/IMG_5645.JPG

Also, if the brass was recovered from ammo fired from a loose chamber and then resized for your gun which may have a tighter chamber (less headspace), the brass stretch/stress may be exacerbated.

Get a headspace gauge/comparator that adapts to calipers like the Hornady gauge show above.

Bug Splat
12-17-2008, 1:59 PM
All brass was first fired out of the same AR. Normally I don't check headspace for such brass since its form-fit but maybe I should start. Going to check the rest of my reload before my next trip out.

ocabj
12-17-2008, 2:05 PM
Just because you're reloading brass that was fired out of the same gun, it doesn't mean you're sizing it optimally. If you follow the die manufacturer's instructions on how to set the full length sizer, you're 99% of the time setting the shoulder back too much.

redcliff
12-17-2008, 3:48 PM
He was firing 9mm, theres no shoulder.

ohsmily
12-17-2008, 4:04 PM
He was firing 9mm, theres no shoulder.

Ouch. Fail. Read it again. He was firing 223. He said that he thought a 9mm casing from some else's gun had somehow ended up in the action of his AR because of the way the ripped 223 cased looked (like a 9mm). After a moment, he realized that this "9mm" case was actually a damaged piece of 223 brass that had ripped when he attempted to extract it from the chamber.

redcliff
12-17-2008, 4:19 PM
Ouch. Fail. Read it again. He was firing 223. He said that he thought a 9mm casing from some else's gun had somehow ended up in the action of his AR because of the way the ripped 223 cased looked (like a 9mm). After a moment, he realized that this "9mm" case was actually a damaged piece of 223 brass that had ripped when he attempted to extract it from the chamber.

Ouch, I guess I do need to read more carefully...where are those bifocals at..

ohsmily
12-17-2008, 4:25 PM
Ouch, I guess I do need to read more carefully...where are those bifocals at..

;) To be fair, he never explicitly stated what he was shooting. But, it could be inferred if you read the whole post.